Autor Wątek: Jeanette Jo Epps 02.11.1970  (Przeczytany 450 razy)

0 użytkowników i 1 Gość przegląda ten wątek.

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 6472
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Jeanette Jo Epps 02.11.1970
« dnia: Styczeń 23, 2018, 12:07 »
Jeanette Jo Epps , która miała wyruszyć w czerwcu 2018 na ISS i wchodzić w skład  Ekspedycji 56/57 została niespodziewanie usunięta ze składu załogi Sojuza MS-09.

Brak komentarza ze strony NASA może być uwarunkowany politycznymi powodami zaistniałej sytuacji.
NASA poinformowała oficjalnie o zmianach w składzie załogi Sojuza MS-09 18 stycznia 2018.

Tym samym Jeanette  Epps  zostanie zapewne 16-tą osobą z korpusu NASA w ciągu 40. ostatnich lat, która na kosmiczny debiut musi czekać co najmniej 10 lat .





Biogram astronautki na stronie NASA: https://www.nasa.gov/astronauts/biographies/jeanette-j-epps/biography

http://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=140.msg114226#msg114226
http://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=140.msg114365#msg114365

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 6472
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Jeanette Jo Epps 02.11.1970
« Odpowiedź #1 dnia: Styczeń 23, 2018, 12:10 »
Astronaut Jeanette Epps bumped from space station flight
January 19, 2018 Stephen Clark


NASA astronaut Jeanette Epps participates in a news conference Nov. 30 in Star City, Russia. Credit: Andrey Shelepin/Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center

(...) The space agency did not disclose a reason for the crew change, and a NASA spokesperson offered no details on the decision.

“A number of factors are considered when making flight assignments,” the spokesperson said. “These decisions are personnel matters for which NASA doesn’t provide information.”

The space agency announced Epps’ assignment to the Expedition 56 and 57 crews in January 2017. The Syracuse, New York, native would have become the first African American astronaut to live and work aboard the station on a long-duration mission, and the fourth African American woman to fly in space.

Epps was training for her first space mission after her selection as an astronaut in 2009, and she was featured in Woman’s Day magazine last year in the run-up to her space station expedition. Epps was scheduled for launch June 6 aboard the Russian Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft with veteran European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst and rookie Russian cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev.

NASA has previously removed astronauts from flights due to medical issues. Apollo 13 astronaut Ken Mattingly was replaced by Jack Swigert three days before launch in 1970, and shuttle astronaut Tim Kopra was replaced by Steve Bowen around a month before a launch in early 2011. (...)
https://spaceflightnow.com/2018/01/19/astronaut-jeanette-epps-bumped-from-space-station-flight/

NASA’s Jeanette Epps won’t be joining the space station as its first African-American crew member this year Epps’ flight to the ISS would have been her first to orbit
By Rachel Becker@RA_Becks  Jan 18, 2018, 9:56pm EST

(...) NASA’s announcement didn’t explain why the agency pulled Epps from the mission. “A number of factors are considered when making flight assignments; these decisions are personnel matters for which NASA doesn’t provide information,” said Brandi Dean, a spokesperson for NASA, in an email to The Verge. Now, instead of taking what would have been her first flight to orbit, Epps will be working out of the Astronaut Office at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. She could still be assigned to future missions, the space agency said in a statement. (...)
https://www.theverge.com/2018/1/18/16907790/nasa-astronaut-jeanette-epps-international-space-station-iss-2018-expedition-serena-aunon-chancellor

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 6472
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Jeanette Jo Epps 02.11.1970
« Odpowiedź #2 dnia: Styczeń 23, 2018, 12:12 »
Women in Space: Dr. Jeanette Jo Epps and the next generation of NASA astronauts
APRIL 28TH, 2015


NASA astronaut Jeanette Epps during an undersea spacewalk to test EVA tools on July 22, 2014. Photo Credit: NASA

(...) Last year on July 21, 2014, Epps started a nine-day mission to “inner” space, under the sea, as part of NASA’s Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project, NEEMO 18. She feels that this experience is effective preparation for space travel. She spent those nine days with five other crew members, the typical approximate crew size for an ISS or deep space mission, simulating operations in space. Communication is also set on a delay, the same type of delay experienced by astronauts in space talking to Earth-based operators.

Epps explained that upon completion of the mission, the aquanauts required a 17-hour decompression in order to return to the surface, known as “splash-up”. They accomplished this by closing the lab’s hatch and changing the pressure in the lab over the 17 hours to that of the surface. Once this was complete, they returned it back to the pressure for about 60 foot under. At this point, the buildup of nitrogen in their blood had returned to normal, so they could reopen the hatch and return to the surface as if the made only a short 60 foot dive—no further decompression was needed. (...)

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJYMfmRLsLc" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJYMfmRLsLc</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJYMfmRLsLc

http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/organizations/nasa/women-space-dr-jeanette-jo-epps-next-generation-nasa-astronauts/

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 6472
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Jeanette Jo Epps 02.11.1970
« Odpowiedź #3 dnia: Styczeń 23, 2018, 12:14 »
Jeanette Epps Will Soon Add Her Name to An Exclusive List of Women Who Have Traveled to Space
BY MELODY WARNICK  AUG 3, 2017

The NASA astronaut will be the first African-American to work long-term at the ISS.


Perry Hagopian; Hair & Makeup: Donna Fumoso using Kevyn Aucoin and LivingProof

Impossible! That's what Jeanette Epps thought when her older brother, Michael, suggested she could be an astronaut.

It was 1979, and 9-year-old Jeanette was at home in Syracuse, NY, while Michael admired the stellar report cards she and her twin sister, Janet, had shown him. "That's what sparked my interest in all things science," says Jeanette, now 46.


The influential Mae Jemison Jet cover

But NASA never felt like a real possibility until she saw Mae Jemison—the first African-American woman to enter space—on the cover of Jet magazine and thought, If she can do it, maybe I can too. So Jeanette earned a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering, then worked at Ford Motor Company and the CIA before being accepted into NASA's 2009 class of nine astronauts.


Jeanette wears a 310-pound space suit for an underwatertraining session at Johnson Space Center in Houston.
Courtesy of NASA


After almost a decade of training in robotics and the Russian language—so that she can communicate with the cosmonauts on her mission—she will become the first African-American to live and work long-term at the International Space Station.

"I'll miss some things on Earth, like friends and family, but I'm going to enjoy my six months in space."

Jeanette knows that little girls, including her nieces, ages 5 and 6, are watching. She'll have with her a few of their drawings, a reminder of a world where girls never have to think the word "impossible" at all. "I want little girls to believe in infinite possibilities," says Jeanette. "I want them to see me and think, Oh, that's just what women do."


Jeanette and German astronaut Alexander Gerst at Johnson Space Center. Courtesy of NASA


Jeanette and French astronaut Thomas Pesquet perform experiments aboard the NEEMO underwater laboratory in 2014. Courtesy of NASA


Jeanette and another astronaut prepare for zero gravity by practicing spacewalking underwater. Courtesy of NASA

http://www.womansday.com/life/inspirational-stories/a59752/jeanette-epps-rising-star/

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 6472
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Jeanette Jo Epps 02.11.1970
« Odpowiedź #4 dnia: Styczeń 23, 2018, 12:15 »
MY STORY: DR JEANETTE J. EPPS ON SPENDING SIX MONTHS IN SPACE



She has a PHD in Aerospace Engineering, worked for the CIA in Iraq and once lived 50ft underwater. But in 2018, NASA'a Dr Jeanette J. Epps, 46, will undergo her most ambitious mission yet...

BY DR JEANETTE J. EPPS MAR 1, 2017

Being an astronaut is one of those jobs where you're guaranteed perspective in life. As we take off, I imagine I'll be thinking about the newness of all the sounds and sights. I've spoken to a lot of fellow astronauts about what it's like going into space; I remember NASA's Gregory Chamitoff describing what it felt like to space walk. He said he remembered being surrounded by the deepest black you can think of. I've always had strange dreams of being in nothingness, just floating in complete darkness or going through the matrix. Soon, it will no longer be a dream.

Space-walk training is one of the coolest parts of my job. NASA operates a Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at the Sonny Carter Training Facility in Houston, Texas; it's a huge pool that's 40ft 6in deep, 102ft wide and 202ft long. There are mock-ups of the International Space Station (ISS) there. We have to get into the space-walk suit, which weighs about 140kg, and then they lower us into the water to simulate what it will be like in space by making us neutrally buoyant, so we neither sink nor float.


Jeanette taking part in a water landing simulation GETTY STR/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

We can be training underwater for six hours, which is pretty draining. At some point, you start feeling the weight of the suit. It's also mentally exhausting, because you have to figure out how to make the suit work. When you spacewalk, you don't actually use your legs very much – you mainly use your upper body, so you need to be able to operate tools and work wearing gloves, which feel like oven mitts. If something breaks while I'm on the ISS I might have to do a space walk to fix it. I'll be one of the flight engineers, so my main duties will be conducting science experiments and maintaining the ISS systems.

I'VE ALWAYS HAD STRANGE DREAMS OF JUST FLOATING IN COMPLETE DARKNESS. SOON IT WILL NO LONGER BE A DREAM.

As a child, I wanted to go into aerospace engineering and work for NASA, but I never thought I'd be selected as an astronaut. Growing up in Syracuse, New York, my twin sister Janet and I were always interested in science and maths. We were the youngest of seven children; my mother Luberta, who worked as a keypunch operator for a local computer company, was very protective of us and always stressed how important education was.

When we were nine years old, my older brother Michael came home from university and saw our school grades on our report cards. I remember being surprised by how proud he was. He said we could become scientists, aerospace engineers or even astronauts. At the time, Sally Ride, who would become the first American woman in space, had just been selected by NASA. I guess his encouragement planted a seed in my mind.

I decided I wanted to study engineering when I was 16-years-old. I was doing an internship in pathology at the New York Health Science Center to figure out what it was I wanted to do. The only reason I didn't continue down that path was because one of the doctors invited me into the autopsy room. When he started taking out the intestines, it was the worst thing I'd ever seen, and I knew I would be more suited to engineering.

As a graduate student at the University of Maryland with my sister Janet, I worked all the time. My adviser always told a story about how he had been out of town and stopped by the lab late on Sunday evening, and Janet (who later went into genetics) and I were there collecting data. We worked constantly, but we didn't think it was strange; we thought it was a good way to spend our time. After grad school, I went to work at Ford Motor Company in their scientific research laboratory as a Technical Specialist.

Sexism and racism are always present, and I've had some pretty negative experiences, both at university and in my career. One of the questions young women often ask me is whether I've had any problems being a black woman working in engineering. I always tell them I have no problem with it, but other people may have and that's their problem. If I make it mine, it stops me from moving forward. The intention [of their negativity] is to stop you from progressing and limit your creative thinking.

SEXISM AND RACISM ARE ALWAYS PRESENT, AND I'VE HAD SOME PRETTY NEGATIVE EXPERIENCES, BOTH AT UNIVERSITY AND IN MY CAREER.

In 2003, I went to Iraq as a Technical Operations Officer with the CIA to look for weapons of mass destruction. As a lab geek, making the decision to go to Iraq was daunting, but I told myself, "I have to do this." I had to do something different and gain a new perspective. I was there for four months and it was an amazing, life-changing experience, but it's not for everyone. As a scientist I'd spent most of my time doing design work and trying to create things, so going to Iraq, helping to solve a national issue and really getting a sense of what was happening, fuelled my desire to know and to understand.

I get very excited when I think about being up in space, partly because I compare it to going into a war zone. Both are very dangerous but, for me, it's a no-brainer: I would rather face the dangers in space than go back to a war zone. I'll never forget the night when we were in the airport in Iraq and a young man had just come back from a convoy; he looked totally different to when I had seen him the previous week. He showed me the rounds that had struck his body armour that day. He was just sitting there thinking about how he was nearly killed. Seeing him and realising that our wars are fought by people's children, people's husbands and wives, had a real impact on me.

I constantly think about work, but when I get home I like to have a domestic life. Once a month, I'll go out to a happy hour, just chat with friends and try not to talk about work. I don't have any kids and I'm one of those people who seems to always have a boyfriend or something romantic going on. I don't know if men are intimidated, but it's hard to keep a relationship going when I'm preoccupied with work.


GETTY IAN CUMING

I'll be one of six living on the ISS and the only woman. I'm not too worried about that, though. I completed the underwater NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO), which places trained astronauts in an underwater laboratory off the coast of Florida for up to three weeks. I was the only female out of six people and we had close quarters, sleeping in bunks.

When you're living 50ft underwater, your blood becomes saturated with nitrogen, so it's one of the closest equivalents to space; you can't just get up and leave. You have to do a 17-hour acclimatisation to purge the nitrogen out of your blood, otherwise it can be dangerous. NEEMO was one of my favourite training exercises. It was tough, but it was so much fun living and working underwater.

I'LL BE ONE OF SIX LIVING ON THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION AND THE ONLY WOMAN. I'M NOT TOO WORRIED ABOUT THAT THOUGH.

The space suits look strange from the outside because they appear as though you're squashed in, but they're more comfortable than they look. We're allowed to pick some of the clothes that will be shipped up to the ISS before we arrive. There are polo shirts, cargo trousers and a couple of uniforms, some of which have Velcro on them so you can attach tools for when you're going about the space station doing maintenance work. We also get to choose home comforts to take. I love woolly sweaters, so I'll pick some of my own; I like that they make it relatively comfortable and you can make the ISS your home.

I'm healthier and stronger now than I was when I was 20. On the ISS, they have an exercise device that helps load your bones so you don't lose any density; there's also a bicycle and treadmill. I'm not a long-distance runner, but I do like putting on my headphones, going for a run and forgetting about the world. There will be iPads and laptops up there so we can watch movies while we run.

When people come back from space, I see how much they want to go again. I suspect I will be one of those people. I'd find myself at the back of the queue, but it's worth the wait – or at least that's what I think I'll come back saying.

http://www.elleuk.com/life-and-culture/the-collective/longform/a34324/my-story-the-collective-jeanette-epps-space-travel-nasa/

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 6472
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Jeanette Jo Epps 02.11.1970
« Odpowiedź #5 dnia: Styczeń 23, 2018, 12:17 »



Nnedi Okorafor, PhD@Nnedi 20.08.2016
@NASA's Janette Epps (an actual astronaut) posing with my Hugo award for Binti. 😃❤️❤️❤️🚀 #HugoAwards




Alexander Gerst @Astro_Alex 21.08.2017
Got a sunburn in my nostrils watching the #eclipse2017 with my crew from Houston. @Astro_Jeanette #exp57


Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 6472
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Jeanette Jo Epps 02.11.1970
« Odpowiedź #6 dnia: Styczeń 23, 2018, 12:18 »





« Ostatnia zmiana: Styczeń 23, 2018, 12:36 wysłana przez Orionid »

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 6472
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Jeanette Jo Epps 02.11.1970
« Odpowiedź #7 dnia: Styczeń 23, 2018, 12:22 »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zE-M9hZ5WQ4" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zE-M9hZ5WQ4</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zE-M9hZ5WQ4

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DAp1_ADRt-E" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DAp1_ADRt-E</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DAp1_ADRt-E

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLt6UwK66O4" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLt6UwK66O4</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLt6UwK66O4

Offline ekoplaneta

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 5209
  • One planet Once chance
Odp: Jeanette Jo Epps 02.11.1970
« Odpowiedź #8 dnia: Styczeń 23, 2018, 12:25 »
Szkoda kobiety  :( Niecałe pół roku przed startem astronautce odwołać start w misji orbitalnej i nie podać nawet przyczyn....  :(

Offline NewMan

  • Pełny
  • ***
  • Wiadomości: 199
Odp: Jeanette Jo Epps 02.11.1970
« Odpowiedź #9 dnia: Styczeń 23, 2018, 15:40 »
Był już taki przypadek odwołania astronautki z załogi bez oficjalnego podania przyczyny.

Była to pani Karen Nyberg.
6 maja 2009 poinformowano o wyznaczenia jej do załogi STS-132, planowanej na maj 2010.
11 sierpnia 2009 poinformowano o wyłączeniu jej z tej załogi z powodu (niesprecyzowanych bliżej) czasowych medycznych przyczyn.

Kiedy w maju 2013 Karen startowała Sojuzem TMA-09M na półroczną misję na Międzynarodową Stację Kosmicznej, wśród żegnających ją, był jej trzyletni synek.

Łatwo więc domyślić się, jaka była przyczyna tego wyłączenia z załogi w 2009.

Teraz niestety nie jest chyba tak dobrze.
Reagując na post swojego brata oskarżąjącego NASA o rasizm i mizoginię, pani Epps podała tylko, że nie było medycznych czy rodzinnych powodów wyłączenia jej z załogi.

NewMan



Offline kanarkusmaximus

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 17030
  • Ja z tym nie mam nic wspólnego!
    • Kosmonauta.net
Odp: Jeanette Jo Epps 02.11.1970
« Odpowiedź #10 dnia: Styczeń 23, 2018, 17:51 »
Nawet jeśli byłaby to jakaś kwestia medyczna, to i tak NASA by tego nie podała.

Tak przy okazji lektura z książki Scotta Kelly'ego:
- to on zaproponował studia nad wpływem długiego lotu z porównaniem do swojego brata - NASA po prostu nie ma prawa do takich sugestii.

Więc optuję, że to jakiś problem medyczny.

Offline NewMan

  • Pełny
  • ***
  • Wiadomości: 199
Odp: Jeanette Jo Epps 02.11.1970
« Odpowiedź #11 dnia: Styczeń 23, 2018, 20:51 »
Tak komentujemy to trochę tu, trochę w wątku o"przyszłych załogach".

W tym całym zdarzeniu nie bardzo rozumiem, dlaczego ten brat pani Epps (w tych skasowanych już postach) zarzuca NASA mizoginię.
Przecież na jej miejsce wyznaczono astronautkę Auñón-Chancellor, więc gdzie tu niechęć do kobiet?

Ponadto, na angielskojęzycznej Wikipedii i źródłach na które się Wikipedia powołuje, gdzie ten post jest cytowany, pada określenie "and allowing a Caucasian Astronaut to take her place".
Jaki Caucasian?
Czy to tylko pomyłka rozżalonego brata, czy też jeszcze coś innego?

NewMan
« Ostatnia zmiana: Styczeń 23, 2018, 20:54 wysłana przez NewMan »

Offline kanarkusmaximus

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 17030
  • Ja z tym nie mam nic wspólnego!
    • Kosmonauta.net
Odp: Jeanette Jo Epps 02.11.1970
« Odpowiedź #12 dnia: Styczeń 23, 2018, 20:58 »
Moim zdaniem zwyczajnie rozżalony brat i tyle. Moim zdaniem nie ma co się nad tym debatować.

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 6472
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Jeanette Jo Epps 02.11.1970
« Odpowiedź #13 dnia: Styczeń 28, 2018, 08:07 »
Zmiany w załodze ISS na pół roku przed startem
BY MICHAŁ MOROZ ON 28 STYCZNIA 2018

18 stycznia NASA poinformowała o zmianie składu 55 stałej załogi ISS. Jeanette Epps została zastąpiona przez Serenę Auñón-Chancellor.

W styczniu 2017 amerykańska agencja kosmiczna formalnie ogłosiła przydział 55 stałej załogi Międzynarodowej Stacji Kosmicznej. Pierwotnie w jej skład weszli Sergiej Prokopiew (Rosja, 1 lot), Alexander Gerst (Niemcy, 2 lot) oraz Jeanette Epps (USA, 1 lot). Przez ostatni rok załoga trenowała do pięciomiesięcznego lotu, który miał rozpocząć się 6 czerwca 2018 roku.

18 stycznia NASA poinformowała o zmianach w składzie załogi. Przydział Jeanette Epps został zmieniony, i w jej zastępstwo na pokładzie Sojuza MS-09 na ISS poleci jej dublerka Serena Auñón-Chancellor. Agencja kosmiczna nie podała przyczyn odwołania astronautki, informując jedynie, że złożyło się na to kilka czynników, oraz że Epps będzie brana pod uwagę w przyszłych przydziałach do lotu.

Zmiany składu załóg zdarzają raczej rzadko. Najsłynniejszym przypadkiem wymiany załogi był Ken Mattingly, który na trzy dni przed startem misji Apollo 13 został zastąpiony przez Jacka Swigerta. Wówczas podejrzewano, że Mattingly mógł zachorować na odrę podczas lotu. Innym przypadkiem był astronauta Tim Kopra, który w 2011 roku po wypadku rowerowym został zastąpiony przez Stewena Bowena na sześć tygodni przed startem misji STS-132, jednego z ostatnich lotów wahadłowca.

W tej chwili nie wiadomo, jaka jest przyczyna wymiany Jeanette Epps. Nieoficjalnie padają jednak sugestie, że sytuacja była nietypowa i może postawić NASA w złym świetle.



Eric Berger z serwisu Ars Technica zasugerował na Twitterze, że przyczyna odwołania Epps była nietypowa / Twitter
Jeanette Epps została wybrana do korpusu astronautów w 2009 roku. Miała zostać pierwszą afroamerykanką wchodzącą w skład stałej załogi ISS. Wcześniej pracowała między innymi jako analityk w CIA.

(NASA)
http://kosmonauta.net/2018/01/zmiany-w-zalodze-iss-na-pol-roku-przed-startem/

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 6472
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Jeanette Jo Epps 02.11.1970
« Odpowiedź #14 dnia: Styczeń 28, 2018, 08:56 »
NASA has pulled Jeanette Epps just months before her first flight
Epps would have been the first African-American crew member on board the ISS.

ERIC BERGER - 1/19/2018, 1:00 AM

(...) Crew members have been pulled from their flights much later than this. In 1970, Ken Mattingly was pulled from his assignment as command module pilot of the Apollo 13 just a week before launch. (Gary Sinise played him in the 1995 film.) That was because the primary crew was exposed to rubella, and Mattingly was not immune from the disease. NASA does not usually say why crews are reassigned unless there is a medical reason. In that case, NASA will sometimes provide limited information.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/01/nasa-has-pulled-jeanette-epps-just-months-before-her-first-flight/