Autor Wątek: John Watts Young (1930-2018)  (Przeczytany 2109 razy)

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Offline Orionid

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« Odpowiedź #15 dnia: Październik 26, 2017, 12:39 »
Conversation With John Young
Q & A
Ex-astronaut says moon's resources may help Earth
PATTY REINERT, Copyright 2004 Houston Chronicle Washington Bureau Published 6:30 am, Friday, December 17, 2004

WASHINGTON - In more than four decades at NASA, astronaut John Young has flown in space six times — seven if you count his lunar liftoff. He smuggled a corned beef sandwich aboard a Gemini capsule, walked the moon during Apollo and commanded the maiden voyage of the space shuttle Columbia.

In an interview with the Houston Chronicle two weeks before his retirement from the space agency, Young, 74, said he'll spend his time advocating for a return to the lunar surface and a human mission to Mars, convinced that life on Earth could depend on it.

Q: What were you thinking about and feeling when you first approached the moon on Apollo 10, and when you landed there to explore on Apollo 16?

A: I was flying the spaceship and we were breaking into lunar orbit, and we broke out over the highlands on the back side of the moon. It was completely dark ... so we were in the dark and then we broke out into sunlight and saw the back side of the moon. The impressive thing about the back side of the moon is how many darn craters it has. If the back side of the moon was facing us, I think human beings would be far more adaptive, far more educated, about (asteroid or comet) impacts on planet Earth. We're going to have a few of those before it's over with. ...

But one-sixth gravity on the surface of the moon is just delightful. It's not like being in zero gravity, you know. You can drop a pencil in zero gravity and look for it for three days. In one-sixth gravity, you just look down and there it is.

Q: Why should humans go back to the moon?

A: The moon has a lot of resources that we'll learn how to use in this century and that will be great. ... The technologies we need to live and work on the moon will save us right here on this planet.

Bad things are inevitably going to happen to us, like comet or asteroid impacts or super volcanoes. Flying in space is risky business, but just staying on this planet is risky business too.

The statistical risk of humans getting wiped out in the next 100 years due to a super volcano or asteroid or comet impact is 1 in 455. How does that relate? You're 10 times more likely to get wiped out by a civilization-ending event in the next 100 years than you are getting killed in a commercial airline crash.

The most dangerous thing we do in Houston, of course, is drive our automobiles to work every day, so you know how dangerous that is and how many people get killed doing that. But wiping out civilization. ...

It's not the point that we should move (to another planet). It's the point that the technologies that we need to live and work in other places in the solar system will help us survive on Earth when these bad things happen.

Q: You commanded the first flight of space shuttle Columbia in 1981, and you've also been a strong advocate for upgrading safety at NASA. How do you think the agency is doing with that, and how long do you think the space shuttle should be used?

A: You're going to need the shuttle to fly 28 missions in 10 years to build the space station. I think the only way to do that is to keep at the shuttle and look at every problem they have, and they're doing that right now. I wish we were flying right this minute.

Q: With Sean O'Keefe retiring, what do you think NASA needs in its next administrator?

A: I think they need to be looking at somebody who understands the business. It's a tough business, you know, doing things for science and technology and advancing the future and making real progress on the long term. It's tough to get people to want to do that.

The goal of going back to the moon and on to Mars — even though it would develop the technologies that over the long haul would save people on this planet — nobody wants to invest in it. You'd think people would be worried about their children and grandchildren and their children and grandchildren, but we really don't worry.

We now have the ability to develop the technology to allow us to control our own destiny, and I think we should do that. I think it would be very important in the long haul to try to keep civilization going. It's a pretty important bunch, a great gang we all belong to — the human race ...

Q: What are your retirement plans?

A: I plan to keep advocating for developing the technologies we need to get off the planet and keep the shuttle going and build the space station and do all the things we need to do to make progress in science and technology. Over the long haul, doing that will certainly make things better for people all over the Earth.

You know, sooner or later, the Chinese and the Indians are going to want two cars in every garage, just the way we do. If they put fossil fuel cars in every garage, there isn't enough oil on the planet to do that.

I think going to alternative sources of energy is the key to the future of civilization on this planet, because we're gonna run out. ... Nobody's worried about that, but we should be very worried about that.

I think it's really important to get folks educated about these problems ... Earth's geologic history is pretty clear: It says, quite frankly, that single-planet species don't last. Right now we're a single-planet species. We need to fix that.

http://www.chron.com/news/nation-world/article/Conversation-With-John-Young-1563092.php

Offline Orionid

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Odp: 86 lat astronauty Johna W. Younga...
« Odpowiedź #16 dnia: Październik 26, 2017, 22:00 »
Book Review:  Forever Young

Reviewed by: Steve Adamczyk
From Ad Astra Summer 2013
Title: Forever Young: A Life of Adventure in Air and Space
Author: John W. Young with James R. Hansen
Format: Hardcover
Pages: 432
Publisher: University Press of Florida
Date: September, 2012
Retail Price: $29.95


If you have been waiting for a book from the only moonwalker without one, you will not be disappointed with Forever Young: A Life of Adventure in Air and Space. John W. Young, with James R. Hansen, has written the epic story of his life not only of adventure, but service to his country and inspiration for the future.

He was born September 24, 1930 and grew up modestly in Cartersville, GA and Orlando, FL. He built model airplanes, played sports, worked at the local Piggly Wiggly, made straight A's, and graduated from high school in 1948. Young entered Georgia Tech on a Naval ROTC scholarship and graduated second in his class with a Bachelor of Science in aeronautical engineering. He hoped to be rewarded with his first choice as a naval aviator, but was ordered to the destroyer USS Laws. Young was finally sent to flight training at Pensacola, Florida, on May 8, 1953 to begin his career soaring above the Earth, and was awarded his gold wings in December 1954.

After the heart-stopping business of carrier landing qualification and two cruises to the Mediterranean, he was sent to his dream job, the Navy test pilot school at Patuxent River, Md. In November 1959 he graduated second in his class and was assigned to armament tests of the all-weather F-4 Phantom. With all the right qualifications he was selected in the second group of nine NASA astronauts in September 1962.

With his assignment to Gemini III, Young was the first of his astronaut class to fly in space. Young's gripping account of the Titan rocket launch on March 23, 1965 almost makes the reader feel like they are sitting between Commander Gus Grissom and Young in the spacecraft. His vivid recollections nearly allow one to smell the corned beef as he offers Grissom the smuggled sandwich. He covers his three-day Gemini X mission with pilot Mike Collins in even greater detail as they took on a far more ambitious flight plan. The tasks included rendezvous and docking with an Agena target vehicle, which was used to boost Gemini X to a new record high orbit.

Aboard Apollo 10 in May 1969 he became the first human to fly solo around the Moon, as he piloted the command module Charlie Brown, in preparation for the Apollo 11 landing.

His next mission as commander of Apollo 16, which made him one of only 12 people to walk on the Moon, almost ended in a disappointing abort prior to landing. With brilliant procedures and a bit of daring from Mission Control, they worked around a problem with the command module thrust vector control. Young and Charlie Duke then landed the lunar module Orion at the Descartes highlands on April 20, 1972. His thorough descriptions help one imagine climbing down the ladder to the lunar surface for three moonwalks of scientific exploration, which helped to rewrite our understanding of the Moon.

Young stayed at NASA, and was appointed chief of the Astronaut Office in January 1974. He was then chosen to command the first-ever launch of the reusable Space Transportation System (STS). He relives the dynamic liftoff of Columbia on April 12, 1981 as he and Pilot Bob Crippen rode to orbit for an ambitious two-day workout of the spacecraft. At the 25-year anniversary of the mission, NASA Administrator Mike Griffin called STS-1 "the boldest test flight in history." He was again in command of Columbia on STS-9, November 28, 1983. Little noted in history, STS-9 could have ended in disaster when the general purpose computer (GPC) 1 and GPC 2 failed in orbit. The crew expertly restored GPC 2 and landed safely at Edwards AFB. But GPC 2 failed again at nose wheel touchdown and two auxiliary power units were on fire at landing.

Young discusses the Challenger tragedy at length and includes almost all of his testimony to the Rogers Commission, which was appointed by President Reagan to investigate the accident. Young also states unequivocally that the astronauts were not aware of the full history of problems with the solid rocket boosters and were not told of the recommendation from several engineers not to fly.

After the shuttles returned to flight, Young and others voiced concerns about debris strikes, but once again NASA minimized the concerns and continued to take risks. Space Shuttle Columbia was lost on February 1, 2003. NASA knew before reentry that foam from the external tank had hit the left wing of the orbiter, but the decision-makers thought there was no serious damage, and that nothing could be done if there was.

Young retired on December 31, 2004 after more than 42 years with NASA. Today he continues to advocate for a return to the Moon for exploration, a base for learning to live in space, and to solve problems on Earth such as power generation. He is also sounding the alarm to track near-Earth objects and devise tools and plans to deflect objects that will eventually be on a collision course with Earth.

What makes this book different than other astronauts' memoirs is the comprehensive technical detail he uses to describe each of his missions and his entire career at NASA. He not only describes the shaking of the mighty Saturn V at launch, but also tells why the oscillations occurred. The book has the depth of a NASA mission report, but reads like the smooth flowing prose of a novel. Everything one would expect to read about his life of adventure in air and space, and much more, is recorded for posterity in Forever Young.

© 2013 Steve Adamczyk
http://www.nss.org/resources/books/non_fiction/NF_131_foreveryoung.html

Forever Young: A Life of Adventure in Air and Space
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0813042097/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&linkCode=sl1&tag=collectspace&linkId=a73a7ad0158c4d38236b49951566bd7a

http://www.collectspace.com/ubb/Forum9/HTML/002144.html
https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-8130-4209-1
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Offline kanarkusmaximus

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Odp: 86 lat astronauty Johna W. Younga...
« Odpowiedź #17 dnia: Styczeń 06, 2018, 17:41 »
Astronauta Terry Virts napisał napisał na Twitterze:
Cytuj
Rest In Peace John Young. You were one of my heroes as an astronaut and explorer and your passion for space will be missed.

Bardzo smutna informacja! :(

Offline Orionid

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Odp: 86 lat astronauty Johna W. Younga...
« Odpowiedź #18 dnia: Styczeń 06, 2018, 18:38 »
 :( Już tylko pięciu żyje tych , co poznało zapach księżycowego pyłu.
Zostało już tylko przy życiu 13 uczestników lotów księżycowych :(
Tylko cała księżycowa załoga Apollo 8 żyje .

Offline Slavin

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Odp: John Watts Young (1930-2018)
« Odpowiedź #19 dnia: Styczeń 06, 2018, 19:50 »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6qBb_iKZbGM" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6qBb_iKZbGM</a>

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Offline Orionid

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Odp: John Watts Young (1930-2018)
« Odpowiedź #21 dnia: Styczeń 06, 2018, 20:01 »
RELEASE 18-001 Jan. 6, 2018

NASA Remembers Agency’s Most Experienced Astronaut

The following is a statement from acting NASA Administrator Robert Lightfoot on the passing of John Young, who died Friday night following complications from pneumonia at the age of 87. Young is the only agency astronaut to go into space as part of the Gemini, Apollo and space shuttle programs, and the first to fly into space six times:

“Today, NASA and the world have lost a pioneer. Astronaut John Young's storied career spanned three generations of spaceflight; we will stand on his shoulders as we look toward the next human frontier.

“John was one of that group of early space pioneers whose bravery and commitment sparked our nation's first great achievements in space. But, not content with that, his hands-on contributions continued long after the last of his six spaceflights -- a world record at the time of his retirement from the cockpit.

“Between his service in the U.S. Navy, where he retired at the rank of captain, and his later work as a civilian at NASA, John spent his entire life in service to our country.  His career included the test pilot’s dream of two ‘first flights’ in a new spacecraft -- with Gus Grissom on Gemini 3, and as Commander of STS-1, the first space shuttle mission, which some have called ‘the boldest test flight in history.’ He flew as Commander on Gemini 10, the first mission to rendezvous with two separate spacecraft the course of a single flight. He orbited the Moon in Apollo 10, and landed there as Commander of the Apollo 16 mission. On STS-9, his final spaceflight, and in an iconic display of test pilot ‘cool,’ he landed the space shuttle with a fire in the back end.

“I participated in many Space Shuttle Flight Readiness Reviews with John, and will always remember him as the classic ‘hell of an engineer’ from Georgia Tech, who had an uncanny ability to cut to the heart of a technical issue by posing the perfect question -- followed by his iconic phrase, ‘Just asking...’

“John Young was at the forefront of human space exploration with his poise, talent, and tenacity.  He was in every way the 'astronaut’s astronaut.' We will miss him.”

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-remembers-agency-s-most-experienced-astronaut

Offline Mikkael

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Odp: John Watts Young (1930-2018)
« Odpowiedź #22 dnia: Styczeń 06, 2018, 20:07 »
Rok - co do miesiąca - po Gene Cernanie :( R.I.P.
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Offline Orionid

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Odp: John Watts Young (1930-2018)
« Odpowiedź #23 dnia: Styczeń 06, 2018, 20:59 »
Od 2016 już 4 księżycowych astronautów odeszło ( w tym trzech, którzy chodzili po Księżycu).
John Young jest po kolei siódmym, który odchodzi w wieku co najmniej 80 lat.

Ikona podboju kosmosu.




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Odp: John Watts Young (1930-2018)
« Odpowiedź #24 dnia: Styczeń 06, 2018, 21:10 »
John Young, ninth astronaut on moon, led first shuttle mission, dies



January 6, 2018 — John Young, NASA's longest-serving astronaut, who walked on the moon and flew on the first Gemini and space shuttle missions, has died. (...)

On the Apollo 10 mission in May 1969, Young became the first person to orbit the moon alone. During the flight, which was a full-up dress rehearsal for the first lunar landing two months later, Young remained on board the command module "Charlie Brown" while his crewmates, Thomas Stafford and Eugene Cernan, flew "Snoopy," the Apollo 10 lunar module, to within 47,000 feet (14 km) of the moon's surface.

On their return to Earth, Young, Stafford and Cernan set a record for the highest speed achieved by astronauts aboard a spacecraft: 24,791 mph (39,897 km/h) on May 26, 1969. (...)

In 1974, Young was named the fifth chief of the Astronaut Office, after serving for a year as the office's space shuttle branch chief. For 13 years, Young led NASA's astronaut corps, overseeing the crews assigned to the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, the approach and landing tests with the prototype orbiter Enterprise, and the first 25 space shuttle missions.(...)
http://www.collectspace.com/news/news-010618a-astronaut-john-young-obituary.html
« Ostatnia zmiana: Styczeń 06, 2018, 21:12 wysłana przez Orionid »

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Odp: John Watts Young (1930-2018)
« Odpowiedź #25 dnia: Styczeń 06, 2018, 21:49 »
Portrety John Younga w moim archiwum:

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Offline Orionid

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Odp: John Watts Young (1930-2018)
« Odpowiedź #26 dnia: Styczeń 06, 2018, 21:49 »
Prawie 53 lata minęły od pierwszego lotu astronauty w kosmos i 34 od ostatniego.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BqBgDsa9yUk" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BqBgDsa9yUk</a>

Link do materiału : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BqBgDsa9yUk

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WuUIXRg4dSY" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WuUIXRg4dSY</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WuUIXRg4dSY

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Odp: John Watts Young (1930-2018)
« Odpowiedź #27 dnia: Styczeń 06, 2018, 23:16 »
Był jedynym astronautą, który brał udział w tylu programach kosmicznych. Zdecydowana większość astronautów programu Apollo odeszła z NASA wkrótce po ostatniej misji tego programu. John Young trwał na stanowisku bardzo długo. To zdecydowanie najbardziej doświadczona ikona podboju kosmosu. Wielki szacunek dla tego człowieka.
teraz ISS, zaraz DSG, potem baza księżycowa, w końcu Mars, Callisto, Tytan i Tryton ;)

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Odp: John Watts Young (1930-2018)
« Odpowiedź #28 dnia: Styczeń 06, 2018, 23:23 »
Legendarna postać.

Bardzo wiele osób kibicowało mu, by wykonał jeszcze jeden lot wahadłowcem na koniec lat 90 / początek lat 2000.
Your mind if software. Program it. Your body is a shell. Change it. Death is a disease. Cure it. Extinction is approaching. Fight it.

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Odp: John Watts Young (1930-2018)
« Odpowiedź #29 dnia: Styczeń 07, 2018, 02:31 »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XLe6NCi4nSU" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XLe6NCi4nSU</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XLe6NCi4nSU