Autor Wątek: Cassini  (Przeczytany 89122 razy)

0 użytkowników i 1 Gość przegląda ten wątek.

Online ekoplaneta

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 4404
  • One planet Once chance
Odp: Cassini
« Odpowiedź #555 dnia: Sierpień 29, 2017, 22:49 »
Poważnie się zastanawiam na ile istnieje ryzyko zarażenia saturiańskiej atmosfery ziemską biotą. Może to mało prawdopodobne ale chyba możliwe. Przecież pojęcia nie mamy co się kryje w głębinach atmosfery Saturna czy też Jowisza. To nieznane nam środowisko a traktujemy je jako śmietnik sond kosmicznych  :(

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 4860
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Cassini
« Odpowiedź #556 dnia: Sierpień 29, 2017, 23:27 »
Ważniejsze wydaje się nie skażenie księżyców. Warunki panujące na Saturnie raczej nie pozwolą na przetrwanie żadnej substancji biologicznej, gdyby taka się znajdowała na pokładzie sondy.

It’s hard to imagine a planet less hospitable for life than Saturn. The planet is comprised almost entirely hydrogen and helium, with only trace amounts of water ice in its lower cloud deck. Temperatures at the top of the clouds can dip down to -150 C.

https://www.universetoday.com/15376/is-there-life-on-saturn/
https://www.space.com/37721-saturn-moons-alien-life-nasa-cassini.html

Życie na Saturnie nie byłoby możliwe. Co z jego księżycami? Tytan oferuje całkiem przyjazne warunki
Rafał Gdak Data dodania: 2015-03-11

(...) W ramach swojego cyklu o możliwościach życia na innych planetach serwis Space.com przyjrzał się Saturnowi. Planeta bez stabilnej powierzchni szybko została zdyskwalifikowana jako potencjalne miejsce kolonizacji, ale spore nadzieje rodzą jej księżyce. (...)

http://www.wiadomosci24.pl/artykul/zycie_na_saturnie_nie_byloby_mozliwe_co_z_jego_ksiezycami_tytan_oferuje_calkiem_przyjazne_warunki_326147.html
https://www.space.com/28786-living-on-saturn-moons-titan-enceladus.html

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 4860
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Cassini
« Odpowiedź #557 dnia: Sierpień 30, 2017, 23:00 »
Astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music
August 30, 2017


https://3c1703fe8d.site.internapcdn.net/newman/csz/news/800/2017/2-universityof.png

After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T).

"To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA's Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn's moons and rings into two pieces of music," says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts & Science at U of T.

The conversion to music is made possible by orbital resonances, which occur when two objects execute different numbers of complete orbits in the same time, so that they keep returning to their initial configuration. The rhythmic gravitational tugs between them keep them locked in a tight repeating pattern which can also be converted directly into musical harmony.

"Wherever there is resonance there is music, and no other place in the solar system is more packed with resonances than Saturn," says Russo.

The Cassini spacecraft has been collecting data while orbiting Saturn since its arrival in 2004 and is now in the throes of a final death spiral. It will plunge into the planet itself on September 15 to avoid contaminating any of its moons.


The orbital periods of the six 1st order resonances of Janus that affect the ring system. The 1:1 resonance is with Janus' co-orbital moon Epimetheus. The corresponding frequencies of these resonances were scaled up by 23 octaves by astrophysicists at the University of Toronto, producing a musical scale. Credit: SYSTEM Sounds/NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Russo was joined by astrophysicist Dan Tamayo, a postdoctoral researcher at CITA and the Centre for Planetary Sciences at U of T Scarborough, and together they were able to play music with an instrument measuring over a million kilometers long. The musical notes and rhythms both come from the orbital motion of Saturn's moons along with the orbits of the trillions of small particles that make up the ring system.

"Saturn's magnificent rings act like a sounding board that launches waves at locations that harmonize with the planet's many moons, and some pairs of moons are themselves locked in resonances," says Tamayo.

Music of the moons and rings

For the first piece which follows Cassini's final plunge, the researchers increased the natural orbital frequencies of Saturn's six large inner moons by 27 octaves to arrive at musical notes. "What you hear are the actual frequencies of the moons, shifted into the human hearing range" says Russo. The team then used a state of the art numerical simulation of the moon system developed by Tamayo to play the resulting notes every time a moon completes an orbit.

The moon system has two orbital resonances which give rhythmic and harmonic structure to the otherwise unsteady lullaby-style melody. The first and third moons Mimas and Tethys are locked in a 2:1 resonance so that Mimas orbits twice for every orbit of Tethys. The same relationship links the orbits of the second and fourth moons Enceledus and Dione, and the combination of the two simple rhythms creates interesting musical patterns as they fall in and out of synchronicity.


A wood carving of Saturn's main ring system designed for the visually impaired, commissioned by astrophysicists at the University of Toronto. One will be able to feel many complex structures within the rings while also listening to their audio form. Credit: SYSTEM Sounds

"Since doubling the frequency of a note produces the same note an octave higher, the four inner moons produce only two different notes close to a perfect fifth apart," says Russo, who is also a graduate of U of T's Jazz performance program. "The fifth moon Rhea completes a major chord that is disturbed by the ominous entrance of Saturn's largest moon, Titan."

Russo and Tamayo are joined in the project by Toronto musician, and Matt's long-time bandmate, Andrew Santaguida. "Dan understands orbital resonances as deeply as anyone and Andrew is a music production wizard. My job is to connect these two worlds."

Titan actually gives the Cassini probe the final push which sends it hurtling towards its death in the heart of Saturn. The music follows Cassini's final flight over the ring system by converting the constantly increasing orbital frequencies of the rings into a dramatic rising pitch; the volume of the tone increases and decreases along with the observed bright and dark bands of the rings. The death of Cassini as it crashes into Saturn is heard as a final crash of a final piano chord, which was inspired by The Beatles' "A Day in the Life", in which a rich major chord follows a similarly tense crescendo.

In addition to the soundtrack, Russo has had a large wood carving made of Saturn's rings so people can follow along with their fingertips while listening. The carving will be part of a tactile-audio astronomy exhibit at the Canadian National Institute for the Blind's Night Steps fundraising event for the visually impaired in Toronto on September 15, the same day the Cassini mission is scheduled to end.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGnuDE7sINI" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGnuDE7sINI</a>

Moons And Rings Translated Into Music

Resonances of Janus translated into music

The second piece demonstrates the scales played by Janus and Epimetheus, two small irregular moons that share an orbit just outside Saturn's main ring system. Together they are an example of 1:1 resonance, the only one in the solar system. The pair orbit at slightly different distances from Saturn but with a difference that is so negligible they swap places every four years. The composition simulates the final few months of Cassini's mission, while Janus is inching closer to Epimetheus before stealing its place in 2018. Together, the two moons play a unison drone but with a constantly shifting rhythm that repeats every eight years.

Russo played a C# note on his guitar once for every orbit while a cello sustains a note for each resonance within the rings.

"Each ring is like a circular string, being continuously bowed by Janus and Epimetheus as they chase each other around their shared orbit," says Russo. Cassini recently captured an image of one of the ripples this creates within the rings. To turn this into music, Russo and Santaguida used the brightness variations in this image to control the intensity of the cello.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SsFZlSQdPWU" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SsFZlSQdPWU</a>

Resonances Of Janus Translated Into Music

"Saturn's dancing moons now have a soundtrack," says Russo.

Russo, Tamayo and Santaguida are the same group who converted the recently discovered TRAPPIST-1 planetary system into music a few months ago. They've dubbed their astro-sonic side-project SYSTEM Sounds) and hope to continue exploring the universe for other evidence of naturally occurring harmonic resonance.

Source: Astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music
https://www.utoronto.ca/news/u-t-astrophysicists-make-music-moons-and-rings-saturn

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 4860
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Cassini
« Odpowiedź #558 dnia: Wrzesień 04, 2017, 18:58 »
Plan ostatniej orbity sondy Cassini
BY KRZYSZTOF KANAWKA ON 4 WRZEŚNIA 2017

(...) Wspaniała misji Cassini dobiega końca. Ostatnia orbita tej sondy rozpocznie się dziewiątego września. Na ostatni etap lotu NASA zaplanowała serię unikatowych obserwacji. Plan lotu i obserwacji sondy jest następujący:

9 września: przelot pomiędzy pierścieniami a Saturnem – minimalna odległość około 1700 nad szczytami chmur,

11 września: przelot w odległości około 119 tysięcy kilometrów od Tytana, który grawitacyjnie nieco wpłynie na trajektorię lotu sondy,

14 września: Cassini wykona serię obserwacji Tytana i Enceladusa oraz pierścieni i chmur Saturna – będą to ostatnie obserwacje tej sondy. Tego samego dnia Cassini także skieruje swoją antenę ku Ziemi by przesłać wszystkie już wcześniej zapisane dane,

15 września, godzina 10:37 CEST: rozpoczyna się wejście w atmosferę. Sonda ustawi się w taki sposób, by instrument INMS mógł przez cały czas wykonywać pomiary atmosfery Saturna, a sonda będzie je ciągle przesyłać na Ziemię,

15 września, godzina 13:53 CEST: wejście w atmosferę. Silniczki sondy będą utrzymywać odpowiednią orientację, tak by zebrane dane były przesyłane na Ziemię,

15 września, godzina 13:54 CEST: przewidywany moment, w którym silniczki sondy nie będą w stanie utrzymać prawidłowej orientacji i zostanie utracony kontakt z Ziemią. W tym momencie sonda będzie znajdować się około 1500 km nad powierzchnią chmur Saturna. Chwilę później nastąpi rozerwanie sondy i tym samym koniec misji. (...)

http://kosmonauta.net/2017/09/plan-ostatniej-orbity-sondy-cassini/
« Ostatnia zmiana: Wrzesień 04, 2017, 19:00 wysłana przez Orionid »

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 4860
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Cassini
« Odpowiedź #559 dnia: Wrzesień 05, 2017, 12:05 »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=stFJjVGKSWw" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=stFJjVGKSWw</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=stFJjVGKSWw

http://newsvideo.su/video/7520340
http://www.pulskosmosu.pl/2017/09/05/14588/

Offline kanarkusmaximus

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 15596
  • Ja z tym nie mam nic wspólnego!
    • Kosmonauta.net
Odp: Cassini
« Odpowiedź #560 dnia: Wrzesień 08, 2017, 21:34 »
Za kilka godzin (po 2 czasu CEST) ostatni przelot Cassiniego obok Saturna. Potem już tylko... droga w otchłań...

Online ekoplaneta

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 4404
  • One planet Once chance
Odp: Cassini
« Odpowiedź #561 dnia: Wrzesień 08, 2017, 21:51 »
Za kilka godzin (po 2 czasu CEST) ostatni przelot Cassiniego obok Saturna. Potem już tylko... droga w otchłań...

A może to droga sondy Cassini do żołądka jakiegoś saturiańskiego wieloryba albo meduzy?  ;)

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 4860
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Cassini
« Odpowiedź #562 dnia: Wrzesień 09, 2017, 01:22 »
Staggering Structure
September 6, 2017

This view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft shows a wave structure in Saturn's rings known as the Janus 2:1 spiral density wave. Resulting from the same process that creates spiral galaxies, spiral density waves in Saturn’s rings are much more tightly wound. In this case, every second wave crest is actually the same spiral arm which has encircled the entire planet multiple times.

This is the only major density wave visible in Saturn's B ring. Most of the B ring is characterized by structures that dominate the areas where density waves might otherwise occur, but this innermost portion of the B ring is different. (...)
https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/resources/7767/

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 4860
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Cassini
« Odpowiedź #563 dnia: Wrzesień 11, 2017, 15:37 »
Po kilkunastu latach badania Saturna sonda Cassini kończy swoją misję
11.09.2017


Artystyczna wizja sondy Cassini zbliżającej się do atmosfery Saturna. Źródło: NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Po kilkunastu latach kończy się misja Cassini-Huygens, której celem było badanie Saturna. 15 września sonda Cassini wejdzie w atmosferę planety i ulegnie zniszczeniu. Wcześniej jednak prześle unikatowe dane zebrane podczas tego manewru - zapowiada NASA.

Misję prowadziły wspólnie: NASA, Europejska Agencja Kosmiczna (ESA) oraz Włoska Agencja Kosmiczna.
 
Dzięki niej naukowcy m.in. odkryli aktywne gejzery na Eceladusie (księżycu Saturna); w latach 2010-2011 mogli obserwować gigantyczną burzę na półkuli północnej, która w ciągu miesięcy okrążyła całą planetę; dokładnie zbadali pierścienie planety i udało im się sfotografować pionową strukturę pierścieni. Dane z sondy pozwoliły też rozwiązać zagadkę podwójnej ciemno-jasnej powierzchni Japetusa (księżyca Saturna) - okazało się, że po jednej stronie księżyca lodowa warstwa uległa sublimacji, pozostawiając ciemną bogatą w węgiel powierzchnię, a po drugiej stronie zestalony lód powoduje, że jest ona jaśniejsza. Poza tym sonda sfotografowała także pełną panoramę wiru wokół bieguna północnego i odkryła gigantyczne huragany wiejące wokół obu biegunów.
 
Jednym z głównych obiektów badanych podczas misji był największy księżyc Saturna - Tytan. W ciągu 13 lat sonda Cassini przeleciała 127 razy obok Tytana, a także dokonała wielu kolejnych obserwacji z dalszej odległości. Dzięki temu wiadomo, że na Tytanie są deszcze, rzeki, jeziora i morza (z ciekłego metanu), a jego gruba atmosfera może być podobna do atmosfery Ziemi w dawnym okresie ewolucji naszej planety.
 
W sumie w ciągu 13 lat sonda przesłała na Ziemię setki gigabajtów danych, na podstawie których opublikowano kilka tysięcy artykułów naukowych.
 
Cassini to największa międzyplanetarna sonda kosmiczna skonstruowana przez NASA. Jej podróż do Saturna rozpoczęła się 15 października 1997 r. na Przylądku Canaveral na Florydzie i trwała siedem lat. Po drodze sonda uzyskała kilka asyst grawitacyjnych podczas przelotów obok kilku planet po odpowiednich trajektoriach: dwa razy od Wenus, jeden raz od Ziemi i jeden raz od Jowisza. Do Saturna sonda dotarła 30 czerwca 2004 roku, wchodząc na orbitę wokół planety. Przeleciała wtedy pomiędzy pierścieniami F i G, pozwalając polu grawitacyjnemu planety na przechwycenie i wejście w rolę sztucznego satelity Saturna.
 
24 grudnia 2004 r. sonda wypuściła próbnik Huygens, który skierował się w stronę Tytana, największego księżyca Saturna. 14 stycznia 2015 r. Huygens wszedł w atmosferę Tytana i wylądował na jego powierzchni, przesyłają zdjęcia. Było to pierwsze w historii lądowanie na księżycu w zewnętrznym Układzie Słonecznym.
 
Misja Cassini-Huygens był zaplanowana na cztery lata podstawowej misji wokół Saturna, do czerwca 2008 r. W tym okresie sonda Cassini dokonała 45 przelotów koło Tytana, 10 obok lodowych księżyców i w sumie okrążyła planetę 76 razy.
 
Pierwsze przedłużenie misji otrzymało nazwę Cassini Equinox Mission i trwało do września 2010 r. Objęło 64 orbity wokół Saturna, 28 przelotów koło Tytana, 8 przelotów koło Enceladusa, 3 przeloty koło mniejszych lodowych księżyców. W sierpniu 2009 r. przypadła równonoc na Saturnie, stąd określenie tej fazy misji.
 
Potem misję ponownie przedłużono, na kolejne siedem lat, jako Cassini Solstice Mission. W tym czasie sonda pokonała 155 orbit wokół Saturna, przeleciała 54 razy w pobliżu Tytana, 11 razy obok Enceladusa i 5 razy niedaleko innych lodowych księżyców. Miała okazję badać planetę w okresie wiosny i wczesnego saturniańskiego lata (jeden rok na Saturnie trwa około 29,5 lat ziemskich).
 
W kwietniu br. rozpoczęła się ostatnia faza misji, tzw. Wielki Finał (Grand Finale). W jego trakcie zaplanowano ryzykowne manewry – 22 nurkowania pomiędzy Saturnem, a jego pierścieniami, z których do wykonania zostało już tylko kilka. W piątek, 15 września, sonda ostatecznie skieruje się w stronę Saturna, by spłonąć w jego atmosferze. Taki finał to okazja do uzyskania danych naukowych, których nie da się uzyskać w trakcie wieloletniej misji (bowiem wiąże się to ze zniszczeniem sondy). Naukowcy mają nadzieję, że zanim Cassini ulegnie zniszczeniu, prześle jak najwięcej danych. Takie zakończenie misji wybrano również dlatego, by uniknąć sytuacji, w której pozostawiona sonda rozbiłaby się kiedyś o powierzchnię jednego z księżyców Saturna.
 
Podczas swoich ostatnich chwil sonda ma używać silników do utrzymania nakierowania anteny nadawczej w stronę Ziemi tak długo, jak to będzie możliwe, by naukowcy mogli uzyskać jak najwięcej unikatowych danych o atmosferze Saturna.
 
Jedną z zagadek, które spróbują rozwiązać naukowcy w ostatnich tygodniach misji Cassini, będzie ustalenie masy zgromadzonej w pierścieniu B. Udało się to wcześniej oszacować dla pierścieni A oraz C, w przypadku grubszego pierścienia B nadal brak dobrego oszacowania. Gdy sonda będzie przelatywać blisko pierścienia B, jego grawitacyjne oddziaływanie powinno zaburzać sygnał radiowy od sondy, powodując jego niewielkie przesunięcia w długościach fali. Analiza tych zaburzeń pozwoli wywnioskować, jaką masę ma pierścień B, a to da lepszy obraz całego systemu pierścieni Saturna.
 
Inną, nie do końca poznaną sprawą, jest długość dnia na Saturnie (okres obrotu dookoła swojej osi). Wydawałoby się, że jest to ustalone od dawna, ale w przypadku planet gazowych nie jest to takie oczywiste, ponieważ nie widzimy powierzchni, a jedynie wierzchołki chmur w atmosferze, które nieustannie się zmieniają i są przesuwane przez wiatry. Aby ominąć ten problem, naukowcy mogą wykorzystać pole magnetyczne i spróbować zmierzyć jak ono się obraca. Będzie to w tej sytuacji najlepsze możliwe oszacowanie okresu obrotu planety. Pomiary wykonane w ramach misji Voyager wskazywały, że okres obrotu Saturna wynosi 10,7 godzin. Przed startem misji Cassini wydawało się, że to ostateczny wynik. Ale sonda pokazała, że rotacja pola magnetycznego zmienia się w zakresie od 10,6 do 10,8 godzin i że jest ono zaskakująco niejednorodne. Zamiast wyjaśnić sprawę, skomplikowała się ona. Badacze mają nadzieję, że podczas nurkowań sondy przez płaszczyznę pierścieni uda się zbadać obszary o silniejszym i słabszym polu magnetycznym, co można zrobić tylko z bliska. Gdyby udało się prześledzić rotację któregoś z tych obszarów, mogłoby to pomóc w uściśleniu okresu obrotu Saturna dookoła swojej osi.
 
Na 15 września NASA zapowiada audycję w NASA TV i na stronie internetowej agencji, dotyczącą misji Cassini i jej Wielkiego Finału.
 
Krzysztof Czart (PAP)
http://naukawpolsce.pap.pl/aktualnosci/news,459618,po-kilkunastu-latach-badania-saturna-sonda-cassini-konczy-swoja-misje.html
https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6942
http://lk.astronautilus.pl/sondy/cass.htm
« Ostatnia zmiana: Wrzesień 11, 2017, 15:43 wysłana przez Orionid »

ekolog

  • Gość
Odp: Cassini
« Odpowiedź #564 dnia: Wrzesień 11, 2017, 21:52 »
To ja dodam, że podczas zagłady sonda do ostatniej sekundy będzie przekazywała dane (i w tym etapie zmienione zostaną zasady bo już nie będzie czasu na obróbkę danych itp) i mam też inną grafikę-symulację tego zdarzenia (z bbc.news/science)

Pozdrawiam

Offline station

  • Sir
  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 1263
  • NASA: "Eventual slip to 2055"
Odp: Cassini
« Odpowiedź #565 dnia: Wrzesień 12, 2017, 08:17 »
Generalnie wielka szkoda, to była wspaniała misja. Pamiętam jak kontrolerzy lotu misji wenusjańskiej Magellan płakali jak dzieci w momencie, gdy urwał się ostatecznie sygnał z sondą po wejsciu w atmosferę. Taka misja to w końcu kawał ich zawodowego życia.
« Ostatnia zmiana: Wrzesień 12, 2017, 08:19 wysłana przez station »
Never Stop Exploring

Offline station

  • Sir
  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 1263
  • NASA: "Eventual slip to 2055"
Odp: Cassini
« Odpowiedź #566 dnia: Wrzesień 12, 2017, 08:24 »
Poważnie się zastanawiam na ile istnieje ryzyko zarażenia saturiańskiej atmosfery ziemską biotą. Może to mało prawdopodobne ale chyba możliwe. Przecież pojęcia nie mamy co się kryje w głębinach atmosfery Saturna czy też Jowisza. To nieznane nam środowisko a traktujemy je jako śmietnik sond kosmicznych  :(

Prawdziwy smietnik to mamy na orbicie wokółziemskiej i tym przede wszystkim powinnysmy sie martwić, Jowisz, Saturn to tak ogromne planety, że pochłonięcie przez ich atmosferę próbnika ziemskiego kompletnie nic nie zmienia. A wiemy o nich wystarczająco sporo by się tym nie przejmować. Co innego księżyce Saturna, które absolutnie nie powinny być w jakikolwiek sposób narażone na skażenia / resztki próbników.
Never Stop Exploring

Offline kanarkusmaximus

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 15596
  • Ja z tym nie mam nic wspólnego!
    • Kosmonauta.net
Odp: Cassini
« Odpowiedź #567 dnia: Wrzesień 12, 2017, 08:27 »
Pochłonięcie zmienia! Pozostawienie na orbicie jest śmietnikiem!

ekolog

  • Gość
Odp: Cassini
« Odpowiedź #568 dnia: Wrzesień 13, 2017, 17:52 »
Dziennikarska, popularnonaukowa refleksja portalu BBC ( i NASA )

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-41222282

Pozdrawiam
p.s.
Amerykanie mają - jak widać - bardziej optymistyczny sposób opisu; spodziewałem się "pocałunek śmierci" :)

Offline kanarkusmaximus

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 15596
  • Ja z tym nie mam nic wspólnego!
    • Kosmonauta.net
Odp: Cassini
« Odpowiedź #569 dnia: Wrzesień 14, 2017, 10:17 »
Koniec tej wspaniałej misji już jutro! Poniżej link do streamu z symulacją pozycji Cassini, na podstawie eyes.nasa

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ic9TukXOP0w" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ic9TukXOP0w</a>

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ic9TukXOP0w
« Ostatnia zmiana: Wrzesień 23, 2017, 23:56 wysłana przez kanarkusmaximus »