Autor Wątek: Apollo 17  (Przeczytany 10179 razy)

0 użytkowników i 1 Gość przegląda ten wątek.

Offline kanarkusmaximus

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 17573
  • Ja z tym nie mam nic wspólnego!
    • Kosmonauta.net
Odp: Apollo 17
« Odpowiedź #45 dnia: Październik 15, 2017, 20:13 »
Ciekawa sprawa - warto zobaczyć! :)

Offline mars76

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 2035
  • MARS - Zmień swoje miejsce zamieszkania!
Odp: Apollo 17
« Odpowiedź #46 dnia: Październik 15, 2017, 22:49 »
Ja już  czekam:)

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 7215
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Apollo 17
« Odpowiedź #47 dnia: Grudzień 16, 2017, 00:31 »
Eugene Cernan z rodziną


Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 7215
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Apollo 17
« Odpowiedź #48 dnia: Grudzień 16, 2017, 00:31 »
W tym miesiącu mija 45 lat od ostatniej w XX wieku wyprawy ludzi na Księżyc. Po raz pierwszy NASA wysłała astronautów w kosmos nocą.
Dziś , po 45 latach , jakby nieco jaśniejsze stają się perspektywy powrotu ludzi na ten bliski Ziemi glob.

'Like a Big Ol' Freight Train': 45 Years Since the Launch of Apollo 17
By Ben Evans December 10th, 2017


Apollo 17 launches into the night at 12:33 a.m. EST on 7 December 1972. Photo Credit: NASA, via Joachim Becker/SpaceFacts.de

Launch of Apollo 17 was targeted for 9:53 p.m. EST, at the start of a four-hour “window”. The three astronauts, clad in their snow-white space suits, were ensconced in their couches aboard America. Countdown operations proceeded without incident and at T-50 seconds the Saturn V transferred its systems to Internal Power. Then, at 30 seconds, the automated launch sequencer on the ground failed to properly command the oxygen tank of the rocket’s third stage to pressurize. Launch controllers responded by issuing the command manually, but the sequencer knew that it had not send the command and refused to proceed. The irony was not lost on the crew. “Everything was fine, but the computer didn’t know it,” said Schmitt in a NASA oral history. “When they went through the final sequence, the computer saw that the signal hadn’t been sent and it said Hold.”
http://www.americaspace.com/2017/12/10/like-a-big-ol-freight-train-45-years-since-the-launch-of-apollo-17/
http://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=800.msg96231#msg96231

(...)The LM ascent stage lifted off the moon at 10:54:37 p.m. Dec. 14. After a vernier adjustment maneuver, the ascent stage was inserted into a 48.5 by 9.4 nautical mile orbit. The LM terminal phase initiation burn was made at 11:48:58 p.m. Dec. 14. This 3.2 second maneuver raised the ascent stage orbit to 64.7 by 48.5 nautical miles. The CSM and LM docked at 1:10:15 a.m. (...)
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/missions/apollo17.html

https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a17/images17.html

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 7215
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Apollo 17
« Odpowiedź #49 dnia: Grudzień 16, 2017, 00:32 »
Ostatni człowiek, który postawił stopę na Srebrnym Globie ,  zaczyna dzielić się ze światem swoim dziennikiem z tamtego czasu.

Apollo 17 astronaut begins releasing diary 45 years after moon mission

Dec. 11, 2017 — Harrison Schmitt went for a walk on Dec. 11, 1972. Forty five years later, he is almost ready to share his diary of that day.

The last of the twelve NASA astronauts to step foot onto the surface of the moon — and the only geologist to do so — Schmitt was the lunar module pilot on NASA's Apollo 17 mission, the sixth, last, and as Schmitt puts it, "most recent human visit to the moon." Now, on the 45th anniversary of his lunar journey, Schmitt is beginning to take the public on a stroll through history, his memories and the findings that came from exploring Taurus Littrow Valley on the moon.

"This project began 45 years ago," explains Schmitt. "I am gradually getting to the point where the drafting, I think, is good enough that I can let other people share in what my impressions were during the mission, as well as what the whole operation was about." (...)
http://www.collectspace.com/news/news-121117a-apollo-17-45th-schmitt-diary.html

In the following chapters, I detail my personal experiences and perspectives as the Lunar Module Pilot and scientist on the Apollo 17 mission to the valley of Taurus-Littrow, the sixth and most recent human visit to the Moon. Although many events and the help of many persons led to this opportunity, and my personal preparation as an astronaut more than met any requirements for flight, my actual presence on the crew of Apollo 17 came through the intervention of George M. Low, then Deputy Administrator of NASA. I will be forever in the debt of this good friend and a giant among the many remarkable managers that brought together the talent, imagination, courage, motivation and stamina of 450,000 others who made Apollo happen.

Harrison H. Schmitt

2017
https://www.americasuncommonsense.com/1-apollo-17-diary-of-the-12th-man/

“Three g’s…three and a half. Stand by for inboard cutoff [of one of the S-1C’s F-1 engines],” Cernan cautioned us.

Two minutes after liftoff, amid the continued intense shaking and with our weight headed toward four times normal, I wondered about having the strength to lift my arms to switches if an emergency made it necessary to reconfigure fuel cells, batteries or oxygen supplies. Of course, in any possible launch abort, as soon as the abort acceleration away from the Saturn stopped, and we would be in weightless ballistic flight, both the vibration and g’s would disappear. At least then I would be able to reach any switches that needed to be reached.

https://www.americasuncommonsense.com/1-apollo-17-diary-of-the-12th-man/6-chapter-5-30-seconds-and-counting/

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 7215
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Apollo 17
« Odpowiedź #50 dnia: Grudzień 20, 2017, 08:53 »
45 lat temu  17 grudnia 1972 Ronald Evans wykonał , jak na razie, ostatni spacer kosmiczny poza LEO.



Walking in the Void: 45 Years Since the Last Deep-Space EVA
By Ben Evans December 17th, 2017

Forty-five years ago, today, a fully-suited astronaut poked his helmeted head out of the side hatch of the Command and Service Module (CSM) into an environment like no other. Ron Evans, one of the three astronauts of Apollo 17—our most recent piloted voyage to the Moon—was tasked with retrieving film from cameras in the Scientific Instrument Bay (SIMbay) aboard the service module. To do that, he had to clamber, hand over hand, across a distance of 30 feet (9 meters), and back again. “Spacewalks” had been performed several times by Evans’ day, but most had been done in low-Earth orbit, with the Home Planet in relatively close proximity. Evans remains one of only three men to have made a “deep space walk”, in the cislunar void between Earth and our nearest celestial neighbor.


Artist’s concept of Al Worden’s cislunar EVA to recover film cassettes from the SIMbay. Crewmate Jim Irwin monitors the proceedings from the command module’s open hatch. Image Credit: NASA

The final three manned missions to lunar distance, Apollos 15 through 17, flown between July 1971 and December 1972, were also the most complex. Known as “J-series” missions, they were characterized by an upgraded Lunar Module (LM), capable of three-day stays on the surface, and a CSM brimming with SIMbay instrumentation to comprehensively survey the Moon. Whilst the Commanders and Lunar Module Pilots (LMPs) of the three missions descended to the rugged mountainous terrain of Hadley-Apennine, Descartes and Taurus-Littrows, the Command Module Pilots (CMPs) remained in orbit, overseeing a significant program of observations and measurements.

Since the cylindrical service module could not survive re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere, it was imperative that the CMPs ventured outside to retrieve their camera film during the return journey. On Apollo 15, Al Worden performed the feat, followed by Ken Mattingly on Apollo 16 and, lastly, Evans on Apollo 17. The deep-space walks, or “Trans-Earth” Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), would occur further from Earth than ever before. In fact, the Moon—just 60,000 miles (100,000 km) distant—loomed large in the astronauts’ view, whilst the Home Planet resembled a blue-and-white football, 180,000 miles (300,000 km) away.


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-mwfNAm4e9Y" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-mwfNAm4e9Y</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-mwfNAm4e9Y&feature=youtu.be

Evans’ first act was to install a pole for the television camera, after which he conducted a visual survey of the service module’s external skin. Some of the paint was blistered, he noted, which readily peeled off with the fingers. Humming to himself, Evans moved to the SIMbay and set himself up in the foot restraints. “Talk about being a spaceman,” he breathed. “This is it!” It was also surprising to witness Earth as a crescent, having seen the Moon in such a phase so many times during his life. “The crescent Earth is not like the crescent Moon,” Evans reflected. “It’s got kind of like…horns…and the horns go all the way around, and it makes almost three-quarters of a circle.”

In spite of the lightheardtedness, there was much work to do. He hooked a tether onto the SIMbay’s lunar sounder data-cassette, thereby ensuring that it would not float away. After returning the cassette to a waiting Schmitt in the command module’s hatchway, Evans returned to the rear of the service module to pick up the pan camera’s data-cassette. At one stage, he paused for a breather and offered a brief “Hi” greeting to his mother, wife and children. All told, Evans was outside for 67 minutes, becoming the 21st human being in history to perform an extravehicular activity and only the third to do so in the vast cislunar gulf between Earth and the Moon.


http://www.americaspace.com/2017/12/17/walking-in-the-void-45-years-since-the-last-deep-space-eva/

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 7215
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Apollo 17
« Odpowiedź #51 dnia: Grudzień 20, 2017, 08:58 »
45 lat temu 19 grudnia 1972 zakończył się księżycowy program Apollo.
Wiele wskazuje na to, że nieobecność ludzi na Księżycu będzie trwała ponad pół wieku.

@LRO_NASA 12.12
45 years ago, geologist Jack Schmitt traversed Taurus-Littrow. This year, he revisited the landing site through my data with some of my scientists. Read all about his new geological perspectives here: http://bit.ly/2hEMC1y




(13 Dec. 1972) --- Scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt is photographed standing next to a huge, split lunar boulder during the third Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site.


(19 Dec. 1972) --- The Apollo 17 Command Module (CM), with astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E. Evans and Harrison H. Schmitt aboard, nears splashdown in the South Pacific Ocean to successfully concludes the final lunar landing mission in NASA's Apollo program. This overhead view was taken from a recovery aircraft seconds before the spacecraft hit the water. The splashdown occurred at 304:31:59 ground elapsed time, 1:24:59 p.m. (CST) Dec. 19, 1972, at coordinates of 166 degrees 8 minutes west longitude and 27 degrees 53 minutes south latitude, about 350 nautical miles southeast of the Samoan Islands. The splashdown was only .8 miles from the target point. Later, the three crewmen were picked up by a helicopter from the prime recovery ship, USS Ticonderoga.

Online ekoplaneta

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 5432
  • One planet Once chance
Odp: Apollo 17
« Odpowiedź #52 dnia: Grudzień 20, 2017, 09:28 »
Apollo 17 to była niesamowita i najciekawsza z serii misja. Teren lądowiska charakteryzował się różnorodnością geologiczną. Astronauci na powierzchni Srebrnego Globu przebywali dwa dni o ile dobrze pamiętam. Mieli okazję przetrenować reperację koła u księżycowego łazika. Ale pamiętajmy, że to nie był koniec programu Apollo bo jeszcze statki tej serii latały do stacji Skylab oraz do wspólnej misji Sojuz-Apollo  :)

Obawiam się, że nieobecność człowieka na powierzchni Księżyca potrwa nie 50 a nawet 60 lat  :(

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 7215
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Apollo 17
« Odpowiedź #53 dnia: Grudzień 20, 2017, 23:08 »
Astronauci na powierzchni Srebrnego Globu przebywali dwa dni o ile dobrze pamiętam.

Cytuj
Astronauci spędzili na powierzchni 3 dni 2 godziny 59 minut i 40 sekund i przebyli 35,7 km. W czasie pobytu na Księżycu wykonali trzy spacery (EVA) o łącznym czasie 22 godziny 3 minuty i 57 sekund.
https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_17

Księżyc kusi swymi tajemniczymi miejscami, więc 60 lat nieobecności ludzi na powierzchni Księżyca może być zbyt pesymistycznym nastawieniem, ale niczego nie da się niestety wykluczyć.

Online ekoplaneta

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 5432
  • One planet Once chance
Odp: Apollo 17
« Odpowiedź #54 dnia: Grudzień 21, 2017, 07:43 »
Księżyc kusi swymi tajemniczymi miejscami, więc 60 lat nieobecności ludzi na powierzchni Księżyca może być zbyt pesymistycznym nastawieniem, ale niczego nie da się niestety wykluczyć.

Tu nie chodzi o pesymizm ale o realizm. Czym do 2032 roku mamy lądować na Księżycu? Nie mamy nawet żadnych poważnych koncepcji lądowników z wyjątkiem BFR SPACE X
Cała nadzieja w Elonie i jego kosmicznej firmie...

Online station

  • Sir
  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 1526
  • NASA: "Eventual slip to 2055"
Odp: Apollo 17
« Odpowiedź #55 dnia: Grudzień 21, 2017, 08:43 »
W kwestii przedsięwzięć agencyjnych - dopóki nie będzie DSG (też nadal tylko na papierze), dopóty nie będzie żadnego racjonalnego programu powierzchniowego. Nie wiem czy Chińczycy będą zaproszeni do DSG, ale jesli nie - to oni ewentualnie na własną rękę mogliby próbować z lądowaniem, w co jednak wątpię bo na razie po głowie chodzi im wyłącznie stacja na LEO.
Zakładać od razu należy rodzenie się DSG w straszliwych bólach (podobnie jak miało to miejsce z ISS - i to nie tylko ze względu na katastrofę Columbia, ale przede wszystkim na niepoważnego partnera jakim jest RKA), zatem zakonczenie budowy to najprędzej 2035 albo raczej zapewne 2040 (dodam, że ISS w swojej pierwotnej postaci miała być ukończona w .... 2005, a ukończono ją dużo, dużo później), w miedzyczasie znalezienie funduszy na projekty lądowników. Tu też nie wiadomo, kto by się tego podjął, JAXA, NASA, ESA? Na pewno nie biedne ruskie, bardzo wątpliwe by Chińczycy. Zatem dla miłosników ekstatycznych uniesień na bazie niekończących się gadających, obiecujących gruszki na wierzbie głów - rok 2045 pewnie będzie tym, gdzie w końcu doczekamy się lądownika. Alternatywa na ten pesymistyczny obraz? Być może Elon, być może jakims cudem BO....
« Ostatnia zmiana: Grudzień 21, 2017, 08:45 wysłana przez station »

Online ekoplaneta

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 5432
  • One planet Once chance
Odp: Apollo 17
« Odpowiedź #56 dnia: Grudzień 21, 2017, 09:20 »
ISS wg planów z 1997 roku miała być gotowa do 2002 roku  ;)
Ale kończę bo robi się nieco off top  ;)
« Ostatnia zmiana: Grudzień 21, 2017, 09:40 wysłana przez ekoplaneta »

Offline juram

  • Pełny
  • ***
  • Wiadomości: 383
  • LOXem i ropą! ;)
Odp: Apollo 17
« Odpowiedź #57 dnia: Grudzień 21, 2017, 09:34 »
Więcej optymizmu, koledzy! Jeśli Chiny w ciągu 10 kolejnych lat uruchomią CZ-9, to wylądują na Księżycu na 60 rocznicę Apollo 11. Tyle off topu.

Offline Mikkael

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 1606
  • "Per aspera ad astra"
Odp: Apollo 17
« Odpowiedź #58 dnia: Marzec 08, 2018, 19:54 »
Niesamowite selfie Rona Evansa w trakcie EVA. W tle - Ziemia :)



http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason-davis/2018/20180308-tt-deep-space-eva.html
GG 8698011

Offline velo

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 1909
    • Blue Dot Solutions
Odp: Apollo 17
« Odpowiedź #59 dnia: Marzec 10, 2018, 21:46 »
Chińczyków jako współudziałowców w budowie w DSG sobie jednak nie wyobrażam. Jeszcze dużo czasu minie aż atmosfera będzie lepsza.

Trudno sobie wyobrazić lot w ramach Commercial Crew do Tiangonga a co dopiero wspólne działania Księżycowe.
Your mind if software. Program it. Your body is a shell. Change it. Death is a disease. Cure it. Extinction is approaching. Fight it.