Autor Wątek: Apollo 11  (Przeczytany 36090 razy)

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Online Orionid

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Odp: Apollo 11
« Odpowiedź #135 dnia: Luty 25, 2019, 08:59 »
Od 8 marca pełnometrażowa wersja w kinach, ale od 1 marca przez tydzień w kinach IMAX

Apollo 11' documentary to launch onto IMAX screens on March 1

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSS8AtjvAcY" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSS8AtjvAcY</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=37&v=PSS8AtjvAcY

February 14, 2019 — "Apollo 11" now has a launch date.

The Todd Douglas Miller documentary, which features never-before-seen 70mm footage and previously unheard audio from the historic first moon landing mission, will exclusively debut in IMAX theaters for one week only beginning March 1.

The feature-length film, which premiered to critical acclaim at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival, will then open in movie theaters everywhere on March 8. (...)

"Apollo 11" was crafted from a trove of archival footage and more than 11,000 hours of uncatalogued audio recordings. The film gives audiences a front row seat for NASA's most celebrated mission, which forever made Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins household names. Immersed in the perspectives of the astronauts, the team in Mission Control and the millions of spectators on the ground, moviegoers will vividly experience the days in July 1969 when humankind took its first giant leap onto another world. (...)

http://www.collectspace.com//news/news-021419a-apollo-11-documentary-imax-release.html

Offline olasek

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Odp: Apollo 11
« Odpowiedź #136 dnia: Marzec 01, 2019, 23:28 »
Wlasnie wrocilem z tego filmu, w wersji IMAX. Super.

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Odp: Apollo 11
« Odpowiedź #137 dnia: Marzec 03, 2019, 20:21 »
Apollo 11 Review
By Stuart Shave 2019-03-01,   four stars

He shoots (for the moon)... he scores!

The new documentary "Apollo 11" by Todd Douglas Miller ("Dinosaur 13") delivers such a successful audio and visual experience that it transports viewers back in time to experience the momentous achievement of landing the first men on the moon as if present on those magnificent days.  But the film goes beyond the already familiar footage to deliver more than just another (albeit stunning) rocket launch sequence; instead, it yields an authentic and brilliant insider's view of Mission Control as well as the Apollo 11 spacecraft.

Let's be honest: we all know how this story unfolds.  This is one of the most important, and well known, events in all of human history.  In 1969 NASA delivered upon the late President Kennedy's wish of "achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the Earth."  In ten short years the United States went from ZERO space travel to this stunning accomplishment.

A quick check of the median age in the United States (38.1 as of 2017) means that at least half of us - yours truly included - were still years away from even being born when the moon landing happened. Until now, we've only been able to experience the event via lower quality archival footage, or through dramatic reenactments, such as 2018's biographical drama "First Man." I even remember watching the Space Shuttle launches on a small TV at my elementary school-interesting, but never thrilling.

Miller's team, working closely with production partners from the National Archives and NASA, have composed a tight and cohesive 93 minutes from more than 11,000 hours of audio recordings and a vast collection of film footage, including a trove of never-before seen 65mm large-format film footage.  I cannot adequately express the degree of technical achievement on display here. This is a crowning execution of a "found footage" concept - except that the visual and the audio were found separately, not in order, and not particularly organized.  The production process also yielded a significant by-product: an enormous collection of archival-quality, high-resolution Apollo 11 footage.  And all of this because they were curious to learn more about the backstory of a moon rock from the later Apollo 17 mission.

The onscreen results are vivid and impressive. The sights and sounds of the crawler carrying the Saturn V rocket to the launch pad are detailed and powerful. Neil Armstrong's son Rick, present at both the original Apollo 11 launch and the February 26th DC press screening, commented that the documentary's depiction of a Saturn V launch is the closest thing yet to his experience 50 years ago.  Several others in the audience voiced their agreement. Many space films have produced exciting rocket launch scenes driven by special effects - I particularly enjoyed Ron Howards "Apollo 13" in that respect.  But "Apollo 11" does all of that using the genuine article.  This is no CGI creation.

The found footage also grants new and unprecedented access to so many corners of the mission that the film can eschew traditional framing devices in favor of in-scene cues. A scene featuring news broadcasts at Mission Control provides a temporal grounding and reminds us of the other things happening in the world at that time - Vietnam, Chappaquiddick - in a subtle manner.  Another scene featuring the price of a cup of coffee at the Houston Manned Spacecraft Center generated an audible laugh from the audience, as did a number of the small lines of banter between the astronaut crew and their support teams back on Earth. The great national narrator of the era, Walter Cronkite, is present in just the right doses, but not as a typical talking head. All of this combines to create an intimacy with the viewer: you are right there, experiencing those moments alongside the staff in Houston.

The score from the film is interesting, but not intrusive. I struggled to place its familiar-but-not quality at first; it was later revealed that the composer sought to use period-specific instruments, including a vintage MOOG synthesizer. It is just out of this world enough, without being silly.

I must comment on the on-screen diagrams depicting the spaceflight: the images they use are simple and effective.  But I am left to wonder if they were drawn from authentic Apollo mission imagery, or if Miller's team decided to substitute the image stylings of a certain vintage arcade game.  In either case, I smiled each time they were on screen.

I have two small quibbles with "Apollo 11." One is that the film grain takes on a strange, blobby quality in a few scenes. I suspect this may be an unavoidable by-product of the digitization process.  It was very isolated, but it caught my eye.  The other is that some of the space-to-ground audio is difficult to discern.  But I'm tempted to give it a pass in the name of authenticity. After all, we're talking about radio transmissions from 160,000 miles away, recorded on 50-year-old analog equipment.  This issue too was rare, but I longed for an occasional subtitle to help me out as I was engaged and didn't want to miss a single detail.

The fact that some internet hackles were raised over whether or not "First Man" displayed adequate levels of patriotism led me to think about how "Apollo 11" treats this topic. Ultimately, I appreciated the humility on display in the historical footage as our astronauts acknowledged both nation and mankind at large. On the issue of patriotism this film finds a balance, displaying neither chest-thumping nationalistic fanaticism nor shrinking from a proper level of pride in our nation's achievement. I came away with admiration for the great deeds carried out through the dedication and collaboration of so many.

Normally I raise a skeptical eyebrow at the prospect of IMAX and its attendant price bump. But in this case, IMAX is absolutely worth it. I encourage you to spend the time to seek out a proper IMAX theater - with laser projection and 12-channel sound - and you will be rewarded for your effort.

If you were alive when we first landed on the moon, see "Apollo 11" and relive the experience. If you enjoy well-crafted historical documentaries, see "Apollo 11" and learn something new. If you have even a passing interest in space exploration, see "Apollo 11." If you are a fan of NASA, well, I'm just going to assume that you already have tickets.


https://www.bigpicturebigsound.com/Apollo-11.shtml

Offline juram

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Odp: Apollo 11
« Odpowiedź #138 dnia: Marzec 31, 2019, 10:03 »
Wędrówki Armstronga i Aldrina.



http://www.lroc.asu.edu/posts/1097

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Odp: Apollo 11
« Odpowiedź #139 dnia: Maj 20, 2019, 22:58 »
50 Years Ago: Apollo 11 Rolls Out to the Launch Pad
May 20, 2019


The Saturn V rocket carrying Apollo 11 shortly after leaving the VAB on its way to Launch Pad 39A.

On May 20, 1969, while Apollo 10 was on its way to the Moon, the Saturn V that carried Apollo 11 on its historic journey took the first steps toward its ultimate destination. Apollo 11 astronauts Commander Neil A. Armstrong, Lunar Module Pilot (LMP) Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin, and Command Module Pilot (CMP) Michael Collins were on hand to watch their rocket make its slow trek from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center. They were busy preparing for the mission by practicing for the first moonwalk and training for splashdown and recovery, including wearing Biological Isolation Garments to protect Earth from possible lunar microbes. The Mobile Quarantine Facility that housed them from splashdown until arrival at the Lunar Receiving Lab was delivered to the Manned Spacecraft Center, now the Johnson Space Center in Houston. The Lunar Module (LM) completed tests to certify it for the loads it would encounter during the Moon landing. (...)

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/50-years-ago-apollo-11-rolls-out-to-the-launch-pad

Offline kanarkusmaximus

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Odp: Apollo 11
« Odpowiedź #140 dnia: Maj 20, 2019, 23:01 »
Ha - naprawdę rakieta prawie dwa miesiące była na wyrzutni? Nie było roll-backu?

Przecież musiało padać w międzyczasie, był pewnie też silniejszy wiatr itp itp.

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Odp: Apollo 11
« Odpowiedź #141 dnia: Maj 20, 2019, 23:03 »
Ha - naprawdę rakieta prawie dwa miesiące była na wyrzutni? Nie było roll-backu?

Przecież musiało padać w międzyczasie, był pewnie też silniejszy wiatr itp itp.

Że w międzyczasie dzięcioły nie zrobiły dziur w rakiecie jak swego czasy tak czyniły w ET wahadłowców?!  ;D

Offline juram

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Odp: Apollo 11
« Odpowiedź #142 dnia: Maj 21, 2019, 09:11 »
Przecież musiało padać w międzyczasie, był pewnie też silniejszy wiatr itp itp.

Wtedy nie przejmowano się złą pogodą, tak jak teraz. Apollo 12 startował podczas ulewy i mimo trafienia piorunem oraz chwilowego zaniku zasilania w module CM, rakieta Saturn V dotarła na orbitę parkingową. ;D

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Odp: Apollo 11
« Odpowiedź #143 dnia: Lipiec 10, 2019, 20:13 »
Ciekawa inicjatywa (z polskim akcentem) dla uczczenia 50 rocznicy lotu Apollo 11. Można ją śledzić na bieżąco.

http://onemoreorbit.com/


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Odp: Apollo 11
« Odpowiedź #144 dnia: Lipiec 13, 2019, 22:58 »
Apollo 11 in Real Time, 50 Years Later
July 12, 2019

(...) Beginning July 16th, visitors to the website will be able to click the “Now” launch button and experience the mission exactly 50 years later to-the-second. The visitor will get to experience moments that have been immortalized in history books. The launch of the rocket (00:00:00), the first steps on the moon (109:23:40), the landing of the Eagle (102:46:02):  these are moments that are typically viewed in a global and historical context. However, it is Mission Control that is given the spotlight on apolloinrealtime.org. Even 50 years later the tension in Houston is palpable. When the LM touches the lunar surface you can feel the collective exhale and watch the anxious hands unclasp in relief. The website reminds us that the response to “The Eagle has landed” was “You got a bunch of guys about to turn blue. We’re breathing again. Thanks a lot.” (102:46:02)“ (...)

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/apollo-11-in-real-time-50-years-later

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Odp: Apollo 11
« Odpowiedź #145 dnia: Lipiec 14, 2019, 23:20 »
Australijskie stacje odbiorcze zapewniały 50 lat temu bezpośredni przekaz z Księżyca

A Wind Storm in Australia Nearly Interrupted the Moon Landing Broadcast
By Dan Falk smithsonian.com  July 9, 2019


NASA Mission Control during the Apollo 11 moonwalk, with the live broadcast from the lunar surface on the screen. (NASA)

Fifty years ago this month, 650 million people—one-fifth of the world’s population at the time—gathered in front of their televisions to watch Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walk on the moon. Though celebrated as an American achievement, those TV images would never have reached the world’s living rooms without the help of a crack team of Australian scientists and engineers, working in the bush a few hundred miles west of Sydney.

The Apollo lunar module had a transmitter for sending back not only TV images but also crucial telemetry, radio communications and the astronaut’s biomedical data—but receiving those signals was no simple matter. The transmitter had a power output of just 20 watts, about the same as a refrigerator light bulb, and picking up that signal from the moon a quarter of a million miles away required huge, dish-shaped antennas. Moreover, as the Earth turns, the moon is only above the horizon for half the day at any one receiving station. So NASA relied on ground stations on three different continents, located at Goldstone, in California’s Mojave desert, in central Spain, and in southeastern Australia. To this day, these radio stations make up the Deep Space Network, allowing NASA to monitor all parts of the sky for communications at all times. (...)


The Parkes 64-meter radio telescope at the observatory in Parkes, New South Whales, Australia. The dish was used to receive video and communications from the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969. (Dan Falk)

Goldstone was picking up the signal, but they had trouble as well: Technical problems resulted in a harsh, high-contrast image; and, worse than that, the image was initially upside down. The TV camera on the lunar lander was intentionally mounted upside down to make it easier for the astronauts to grab in their bulky suits; a technician at Goldstone apparently forgot to flip the switch that would invert the image. (...)

“I reckon that’s one of the most important switches in history,” says Glen Nagel, an outreach officer at the CDSCC, pointing to a toggle-switch attached to a small circuit board. It’s displayed in a glass cabinet alongside a Hasselblad medium-format camera and other artifacts associated with the Apollo missions. “Without that switch, all of us would have had to have stood on our heads to watch man walk on the moon—or turn our television sets upside down.” (...)
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/wind-storm-australia-almost-interrupted-apollo-11-moon-landing-broadcast-180972581/

Space Communications and Navigation: Exploration Enabled, Then and Now
July 1, 2019

(...) When Armstrong finally started descending the Lunar Module ladder three hours after the Eagle had landed at Tranquility Base, a 64-meter antenna in Goldstone, California received the first downlink, and two-way communication from the surface of the Moon.


Deep Space Station-14 (DSS-14) located at Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex (GDSCC) Credits: Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex

However, by the time Armstrong reached the foot of the ladder, Mission Control in Houston, Texas switched the transmission to Honeysuckle Creek’s 26-meter antenna located outside of Canberra, Australia. The improvement in picture quality was extraordinary.


Parkes Observatory located in Parkes, New South Wales, Australia Credits: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)

But, responsibility for voice communications remained at Goldstone.

These iconic words in history, “That's one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind” ended their 240,000-mile journey to Earth at one location, while the pictures of Neil Armstrong speaking them came to be seen through another.

After almost nine minutes into the broadcast, a 64-meter dish at Parkes Observatory located in Parkes, New South Wales, Australia provided an even better picture. Television transmission would continue through July 23, 1969. (...)
https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/heo/scan/apollo50

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Apollo Connection
July 16, 2019 Written by Jane Platt, Matthew Segal Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

(...) The Apollo program needed full-time communications support, and JPL had its own missions, so DSN engineers helped design and operate a "parallel network." After the Apollo program ended, the DSN inherited the equipment. Since then, the DSN has kept the legacy alive by providing communications for a very long roll call of missions — for NASA and other space agencies. Managed by JPL, the DSN will play a central role in NASA's Artemis lunar explorations and the agency's plans for astronauts to one day go beyond the Moon to Mars. (...)
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/the-jet-propulsion-laboratorys-apollo-connection
« Ostatnia zmiana: Sierpień 05, 2019, 02:06 wysłana przez Orionid »

Offline Ergosum

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Odp: Apollo 11
« Odpowiedź #146 dnia: Lipiec 16, 2019, 16:36 »
20VII1969 – start Saturn5/Apollo11.
To już pół wieku od tych podskakujących na ekranie czarno-białego telewizora półprzezroczystych duchów na Księżycu...
Gdyby wtedy ktoś mnie przekonywał, że przez 50 lat człowiek nie wyląduje na Marsie, przestanie lądować na Księżycu z końcem programu Apollo i w ogóle nastąpi zastój  w rozwoju załogowej astronautyki ( która wówczas miała ledwie nieco ponad 8 lat! ), to zapewne bym nie uwierzył lub przeżył totalne rozczarowanie. :(
 Ale chyba nareszcie coś tam jednak widać w tym tunelu...

Offline kanarkusmaximus

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Odp: Apollo 11
« Odpowiedź #147 dnia: Lipiec 16, 2019, 18:07 »
Dokładnie 50 lat od startu misji Apollo 11. Start nastąpił o 14:32 CET. Tak z ciekawostki dopiero dziś zdałem sobie sprawę, że w 1969 roku nie było czasu letniego w Polsce. :)

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Odp: Apollo 11
« Odpowiedź #148 dnia: Lipiec 16, 2019, 18:37 »
20VII1969 – start Saturn5/Apollo11.

Nie 20 tylko 16 :)

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Odp: Apollo 11
« Odpowiedź #149 dnia: Lipiec 16, 2019, 18:55 »

No przecież! 20-go było lądowanie. :)