Autor Wątek: Viking Lander  (Przeczytany 3810 razy)

0 użytkowników i 1 Gość przegląda ten wątek.

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 7775
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Viking Lander
« Odpowiedź #30 dnia: Marzec 05, 2018, 07:56 »
I jeszcze interesujący przyczynek do misji Vikingów

NASA's Viking Data Lives on, Inspires 40 Years Later
July 20, 2016

As engineers and scientists planned for later missions to Mars, the rolls of microfilm containing the Viking data were stored away for safekeeping and potential later use. It would be another 20 years before someone looked at some of these data again.


Data from the Viking biology experiments, which is stored on microfilm, has to be accessed using a microfilm reader. David Williams and the archive team are working to digitize the data to make it more accessible.  Credits: David Williams

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nasas-viking-data-lives-on-inspires-40-years-later

Offline ekoplaneta

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 5838
  • One planet Once chance
Odp: Viking Lander
« Odpowiedź #31 dnia: Marzec 05, 2018, 08:13 »
Mnie przeraził ten fragment tekstu:

"I remember getting to hold the microfilm in my hand for the first time and thinking, 'We did this incredible experiment and this is it, this is all that's left,'" Williams said. "If something were to happen to it, we would lose it forever. I couldn't just give someone the microfilm to borrow because that's all there was."

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nasas-viking-data-lives-on-inspires-40-years-later

To NASA nie robiła kopii zapasowych tych mikrofilmów? Masakra, że tak cenne dane były przechowywane na jednej jedynej rolce   :o Przynajmniej tak zrozumiałem z tego artykułu!

Poza tym ciekawy jest ten fragment dotyczący wyników doświadczeń biologicznych:

In one of the experiments, known as Labeled Release (LR), the Viking landers scooped up soil samples and applied a nutrient cocktail. If microbes were present in the soil, they would likely metabolize the nutrient and release carbon dioxide or methane. The experiment did indicate metabolism, but the other two Viking experiments did not find any organic molecules in the soil. The science team believed the LR data had been skewed by a non-biological property of Martian soil, resulting in a false positive. While arguments continue, this remains the consensus view.

This was not the first time scientists disagreed about the results of the Viking biology experiments. Since the very first data analysis, scientists argued about whether the experiments proved that Mars really was harboring life.

"The data were very controversial," Williams said. "But, in a way, it helped push for continued Mars missions and landers. The very next missions were planned around what we found with Viking, and then the next group of missions built upon those. But even our most current Mars missions still refer back to Viking."


https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nasas-viking-data-lives-on-inspires-40-years-later

Strach pomyśleć jakie jeszcze bezcenne dane, mogą leżeć i ,,rdzewieć" w NASA!  :(  Z drugiej strony chwała NASA, że te dane będą archiwizowane i dostępne dla wszystkich ludzi na świecie. Bo u nas w Polsce ileż cennych danych np. dotyczących terenowych badań przyrodniczych niszczeje w archiwach uczelni czy instytutów naukowych?  :(
« Ostatnia zmiana: Marzec 05, 2018, 08:18 wysłana przez ekoplaneta »

Offline ekoplaneta

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 5838
  • One planet Once chance
Odp: Viking Lander
« Odpowiedź #32 dnia: Marzec 16, 2018, 08:41 »
Znalazłem dziś ładne logo z okazji 40 lecia misji Vikingów, więc (nico już po czasie) chciałem się z Wami nim podzielić:



https://marsmobile.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/viking-40-year-anniversary-artwork-viking-1-and-2-orbiter-and-lander


Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 7775
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Viking Lander
« Odpowiedź #34 dnia: Marzec 17, 2018, 07:35 »

Offline ekoplaneta

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 5838
  • One planet Once chance
Odp: Viking Lander
« Odpowiedź #35 dnia: Czerwiec 11, 2018, 22:23 »
Kto chciałby przeżyć namiastkę czekania na szczęśliwe wylądowanie Vikinga 1 na Marsie polecam filmik:

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/video/details.php?id=80

W kolejnym filmie, do którego link podałem niżej, możemy wczuć się w atmosferę czekania na pierwsze zdjęcie z Chryse Planitia i powierzchni Marsa w ogóle wykonaną po raz pierwszy w historii ludzkości przez lądownik Viking 1 oraz oglądanie nadsyłania tej fotografii polecam film:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXEM9MMVjpk
« Ostatnia zmiana: Czerwiec 11, 2018, 22:49 wysłana przez ekoplaneta »

Offline ekoplaneta

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 5838
  • One planet Once chance
Odp: Viking Lander
« Odpowiedź #36 dnia: Lipiec 13, 2018, 13:30 »
Lądowniki Viking mogły wykryć związki organiczne w regolicie Marsa już w 1976 roku. Tylko, że wykryty wówczas chlor był podejrzewany jako pozostałość po sterylizacji jakiej poddano sondy na Ziemi. Poza tym procedura wykrywania związków organicznych w regolicie Marsa polegała na wcześniejszym ogrzewaniu pobranej próbki. Podczas podgrzewania ewentualnie obecne w regolicie nadchlorany (wykryte na Marsie przez Phoenixa w 2008 r.) utleniłyby jakiekolwiek obecne w podłożu związki organiczne!

http://www.marsdaily.com/reports/NASA_May_Have_Destroyed_Evidence_for_Organics_on_Mars_40_Years_Ago_999.html

Fajny jest tytuł arta dotyczącego  tej sprawy w New Scientist: ,,Whoops! NASA burned best evidence for life on Mars 40 years ago"  ;D

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2173751-whoops-nasa-burned-best-evidence-for-life-on-mars-40-years-ago/

Offline ekoplaneta

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 5838
  • One planet Once chance
Odp: Viking Lander
« Odpowiedź #37 dnia: Sierpień 16, 2018, 12:43 »
Jakim długotrwałym i czasochłonnym procesem było wybieranie lądowisk dla Lądowników Viking 1 i 2 można się przekonać z lektury poniższej strony:

https://history.nasa.gov/SP-4212/ch9.html

Początkowo opierano się na fotografiach Marinera 9 a dopiero po dotarciudo celu i badaniach Vikingów Orbiter zaktualizowano plany o wykonane przez nie zdjęcia powierzchni Marsa.

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 7775
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Viking Lander
« Odpowiedź #38 dnia: Sierpień 31, 2018, 23:50 »
Zamiast Voyagerów marsjańskich doczekaliśmy sie udanej misji Vikingów.

'Second-Class Endeavor': Remembering Project Viking, First Fully Successful Mars Landing Mission (Part 1)
By Ben Evans, on August 20th, 2018


Artist’s concept of the deployment of the aeroshell-enshrouded Viking lander from the orbiter. Image Credit: Don Davis

(...) Viking 1 became the first spacecraft in history to soft-land on Mars and complete its mission, picking up the baton from the Soviet Union’s failed Mars 3, which had successfully alighted on alien soil in December 1971 and produced a partial, though unintelligible image, before transmission ended and contact was lost. The spacecraft also afforded humanity our best and most complete perspective of the planet for the next two decades and the Viking 1 lander survived for 2,307 days from its touchdown on 20 July 1976 through its End of Mission (EOM) on 11 November 1982. (...)
Costing around $1 billion (or $3.8 billion today), the Viking program was the most expensive U.S. mission yet sent to Mars. (...)

Had it borne fruit, Voyager’s 2,400-pound (1,100 kg) orbiter would have established itself into a 12-hour circular path around Mars, whereupon it would have entered “site-certification” operations to scour the surface for an appropriate spot to deposit its lander. Protected during the early stages of its descent by a cone-shaped aeroshell, the 13,000-pound (5,900 kg) lander would have entered the Martian atmosphere and employed on-board engines and parachutes to accomplish a soft landing on the Red Planet. Descending at a rate of between 460 feet (140 meters) and 1,100 feet (335 meters) per second, depending upon local atmospheric density, the lander would be slowed by a system of braking rockets and steered towards its touchdown point by an inertial guidance system and radar altimeter. As it neared the surface, its aeroshell would have been jettisoned, by which time its rate of descent would have slowed substantially to a sedate 5 feet (1.5 meters) per second. The engines would have shut down at 10 feet (3 meters) above the ground, allowing the lander to alight gently onto Mars. (...)
http://www.americaspace.com/2018/08/20/second-class-endeavor-remembering-project-viking-first-fully-successful-mars-landing-mission-part-1/

'Hard to Recapture the Mood': Remembering Project Viking, First Fully Successful Mars Landing Mission (Part 2)
By Ben Evans, on August 26th, 2018


The aeroshell for the Viking lander undergoes preparation for flight. Photo Credit: NASA

(...) Headed by Project Manager Jim Martin, and with Dr. Gerald Soffen as Project Scientist, the Viking Project Office formally opened in April 1969 and its spacecraft quickly expanded beyond anything previously attempted. In its original incarnation, it was based upon the earlier Mariner series, but it soon became clear that significant structural changes to allow for the mating of the orbiter to the soft-lander would be necessary. Power provision for the lander during the trans-Mars cruise was also acutely required, necessitating the enlargement of the orbiter’s solar arrays from 82.8 square feet (7.7 square meters) to 165.7 square feet (15.4 square meters). “The decision to build a large soft-landing craft, instead of a small hard-lander, led to the requirement for a large orbiter,” noted Edward Clinton Ezell and Linda Neuman Ezell in their NASA tome, On Mars. “The orbiter would not only have to transport the lander, it could also have to carry an increased supply of propellant for longer engine firings during Mars Orbit Insertion.”

However, within its first 12 months of life, Project Viking’s costs began to spiral, from $364.1 million when first presented to Congress in March 1969, to over $606 million by August, to an admission from Naugle by year’s end that $750 million was a more realistic figure. Scathing budget cuts throughout 1970—which notably savaged the Apollo lunar program, forcing the cancelation of two landing missions—ultimately led NASA Administrator Tom Paine to only one viable option: to delay the Viking missions by two years to the summer 1975 Mars launch window. Under this revised architecture, the end-of-conceptual-design Preliminary Design Review (PDR) occurred in October 1971, followed by the Critical Design Review (CDR) in July 1973, leading to the testing and shipment of hardware to the launch site at Cape Kennedy in Florida by February 1975.

In their eventual form—whose design had essentially been finalized at the PDR stage—the twin Viking orbiters consisted of octagonal spacecraft “buses”, measuring about 8.2 feet (2.5 meters) across, and equipped with four electricity-generating solar arrays. The later totaled 160 square square feet (15 square meters) in area, with additional power provided by two nickel-cadmium batteries. A dual-propellant system of monomethyl hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide supported a liquid-fueled rocket engine for mid-course correction maneuvers and Mars Orbit Insertion (MOI), with subsequent attitude control achieved by 12 compressed-nitrogen thrusters. Communications were afforded by an S-band transmitter and a pair of dish-like antennas. Meanwhile, the landers traveled to Mars in a “quiescent” state, encapsulated within their aeroshells and attached to the orbiters. Six-sided and three-legged, each lander’s footpads formed an equilateral triangle of more than 7 feet (2.2 meters) when viewed from above. Propulsion during the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) phase of its mission was provided by hydrazine, with electricity produced by means of a pair of on-board Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). Aboard each lander was a 200-pound (90 kg) payload, including 360-degree scan cameras, a sampling arm with collector head, a meteorology boom, a seismometer, a biology experiment and Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer to explore Mars’ suitability for microbial life, its chemical composition, weather, seismic nature, magnetic properties and overall appearance. Fully fueled, each orbiter/lander combo weighed about 7,780 pounds (3,530 kg).(...)
http://www.americaspace.com/2018/08/26/hard-to-recapture-the-mood-remembering-project-viking-first-fully-successful-mars-landing-mission-part-2/

Offline ekoplaneta

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 5838
  • One planet Once chance
Odp: Viking Lander
« Odpowiedź #39 dnia: Wrzesień 05, 2018, 10:25 »
Marsjańskie Voyagery to byłyby strasznie drogie misje. A nie wiem czy przyniosłyby więcej danych niż Vikingi? Początkowo myślano, żeby wysłać na Marsa lądownik wielkości księżycowego LMa!  :o Żeby tym samym przygotować grunt pod misje załogowe. Ale badania Marinera 4 i kolejnych wykazały, że atmosfera Marsa jest 100 razy cieńsza niż na Ziemi i wówczas zamieniono ten lądownik na dwie duże misje wysyłane jednym Saturnem V. Każda z tych misji tak jak Vikingi miała się składać z lądownika i orbitera. Oczywiście lądowniki Voyager byłyby zapewne cięższe niż Viking.
Strasznie żałuję, że po udanych Vikingach nie poleciały proponowane łaziki, klasy nawet MSL!  8)

Offline kanarkusmaximus

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 18044
  • Ja z tym nie mam nic wspólnego!
    • Kosmonauta.net
Odp: Viking Lander
« Odpowiedź #40 dnia: Wrzesień 05, 2018, 14:41 »
Ekoplaneto, ale czy łazik w latach 80 XX wieku dałby radę na Marsie? Przy tamtym stanie techniki - raczej wątpię!

Offline ekoplaneta

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 5838
  • One planet Once chance
Odp: Viking Lander
« Odpowiedź #41 dnia: Wrzesień 05, 2018, 15:08 »
Ekoplaneto, ale czy łazik w latach 80 XX wieku dałby radę na Marsie? Przy tamtym stanie techniki - raczej wątpię!

Myślę, że łazik dałby rade, tylko musiałby na każdy swój ruch czekać na komendy z Ziemi, co zapewne spowolniłoby jego jazdę.

Offline kanarkusmaximus

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 18044
  • Ja z tym nie mam nic wspólnego!
    • Kosmonauta.net
Odp: Viking Lander
« Odpowiedź #42 dnia: Wrzesień 05, 2018, 16:16 »
No właśnie - czyli przejechałyby maksymalnie kilkaset metrów.

Nie wydaje mi się, żeby udało się lądowanie nawet w takich regionach jak Gale. Poza tym pobieranie próbek czy robienie wielu panoram byłoby problematyczne. Czyli - efekt z misji nie byłby wystarczający  żeby uzasadnić duże koszty.

Offline ekoplaneta

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 5838
  • One planet Once chance
Odp: Viking Lander
« Odpowiedź #43 dnia: Wrzesień 13, 2018, 14:51 »
Stary ale cenny film o misjach Vikingów  :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQkSC_53tv8

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQkSC_53tv8" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQkSC_53tv8</a>
« Ostatnia zmiana: Wrzesień 13, 2018, 16:25 wysłana przez kanarkusmaximus »