Autor Wątek: Australijski program kosmiczny  (Przeczytany 1285 razy)

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Offline Orionid

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Australijski program kosmiczny
« dnia: Luty 13, 2017, 17:21 »
Mimo , że Australia  ma 3. astronautów urodzonych na jej terenie to nie posiada własnej agencji kosmicznej.
Jednak zaangażowanie międzynarodowe w programy kosmiczne jest znaczące i zaczęto myśleć o powołaniu takiego bytu.


The Canberra Deep Space Communication Complex, located at Tidbinbilla, just outside Canberra, is one of three Deep Space Network stations around the world providing continuous, two-way radio contact with spacecraft exploring our solar system and beyond. Credit: CSIRO/Robert Kerton, CC BY

http://theconversation.com/why-its-time-for-australia-to-launch-its-own-space-agency-72735
dublet: https://phys.org/news/2017-02-australia-space-agency.html

Astronauci urodzeni w Australii:
Phillip Kenyon Chapman
Paul Desmond Scully-Power
Andrew Sydney Withiel Thomas


Offline Adam.Przybyla

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Odp: Australijski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #1 dnia: Marzec 15, 2017, 23:25 »
Australijczycy dlugo czekali na nastepny krok po IMHO genialnym, samonaprawiajacym sie FedSat-cie. Ale wyglada na to, ze w koncu sie doczekali:
http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/lifestyle/sa-lifestyle/pocket-rocket-sas-shoeboxsized-satellite/news-story/107518bd26cbb999b0546b839f6c3fc7
testuja kilka satelitow i jeden ... silnik. Czapki z glow, widac, ze jak sie chodzi do gory nogami, to do glowy przychpdza baaardzo dobre pomysly;-);-) Z powazaniem
                                         Adam Pryzbyla
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Offline Adam.Przybyla

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Odp: Australijski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #2 dnia: Wrzesień 23, 2017, 16:47 »
A moze i do ESA w koncu australijczycy wstapia:
https://theconversation.com/lost-in-space-australia-dwindled-from-space-leader-to-also-ran-in-50-years-83310
"Potentially beneficial membership of the European Space Agency (the European Launcher Development Organisation’s successor), to which Australia has been repeatedly invited, has been constantly rejected, also (ostensibly) on the basis of cost."
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Offline Orionid

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Odp: Australijski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #3 dnia: Wrzesień 25, 2017, 14:50 »
Andrew Sydney Thomas bardzo popiera plany utworzenia australijskiej agencji kosmicznej.

Thomas calls for new comprehensive Australian Space Agency at IAC address
Adelaide, Australia (SPX) Sep 24, 2017 by Philippe Cosyn
 
(...) He was hoping that the upcoming IAC was to provide an impetus to set up such an Australian national Space Agency "to decide national policy, to strategize and to build a space infrastructure."

Praising the existence of already some 50 space-related businesses in South Australia alone, he said "investments must go beyond the next election cycle" and be forward-looking.

Previously, South Australian Prime Minister Jay Weatherill announced the creation of a Space Industry Centre (SASIC), which will provide grants of $ 1 million to develop local space business. Calling on the Federal Prime Minister to establish a National Space Agency, PM Weatherill said he expected that setting up such an agency would more than double the already more than 11,500 jobs in the space field. (...)

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Thomas_calls_for_new_comprehensive_Australian_Space_Agency_at_IAC_address_999.html

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Odp: Australijski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #4 dnia: Grudzień 31, 2017, 23:58 »
29 listopada 1967 minęło 50 lat od wystrzelenia na orbitę wokółziemską pierwszego australijskiego satelity Wresat . Australia stała się trzecim krajem na świecie, który umieścił swego satelitę na orbicie wokółziemskiej.
Również jest trzecim  krajem, który dokonał tego ze swego terytorium.
Do wystrzelenia posłużyła amerykańska rakieta Redstone Sparta.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Or5dyDmBq_I" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Or5dyDmBq_I</a>
Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Or5dyDmBq_I&t=21s


PHOTO: Australia's first satellite, WRESAT, being launched from Woomera in 1967. (Supplied: National Archives of Australia)

50 years since Australia's first satellite, WRESAT, launched from Woomera
ABC North and West By Paul Culliver Updated 29 Nov 2017

Australia is celebrating 50 years since the launch of its first satellite.

The Weapons Research Establishment Satellite (WRESAT) was launched from Woomera, in outback South Australia, on November 29, 1967.

Space historian Kerrie Dougherty said the United States brought 10 Redstone rockets to Australia for testing and because all nine launches went to plan, they had one left over.

"The Americans didn't want to take it back to the US because it was essentially an obsolete missile, so they just didn't want to spend the money to take it back," she said.

"So the offer was made to Australia: 'If you want to build a satellite, we'll let you have this rocket to launch this satellite'."

Ms Dougherty said people from the weapons research group had to approach a government representative at a Christmas party to get permission for the launch.

"They had to get him out of his drinking party on Christmas Eve 1966 to get permission, in principle, to go ahead while official permission was sought from the Government," she said.

Ms Dougherty said with US personnel set to leave Woomera at the end of 1967, Australia had just 11 months to complete the project.

"Even by today's standards, that is an incredibly tight program to design, build, test and then launch a satellite," she said.


PHOTO: Scientists loaded the satellite with physics experiments from the University of Adelaide. (Supplied: National Archives of Australia)

Peter Fietz was a 21-year-old apprentice working at the Weapons Research Establishment at the time and was one who witnessed the launch.

"I saw things that were generally science fiction for most people, but they were just considered parts of our normal life," he said.

Mr Fietz said he remembered how quiet it was compared to other rocket launches he had seen at the base.

"[Normally there are] gigantic vibrations that shake your whole body, but this was so much smoother [and] so much quieter," he said.

"[It was] almost routine, almost not surprising at all. It's worked and it hasn't failed, and there wasn't any more excitement than that."

Alan Forbes designed the telemetry for WRESAT, used to transmit data from the satellite while in orbit.

He said he was given a NASA booklet and asked what he could make of it for the Australian satellite.

"They were terribly well conservative in their design, and I came up with something better," Mr Forbes said.

The experiments on board were designed by the University of Adelaide and had to be transmitted as radio waves back to earth as the satellite was to burn up upon return.

Mr Forbes and his team also designed a failsafe self-destruct in case the rocket went astray during the launch.

"If my link were to fail, it would be blown up anyway, so I had to get it right," he said.


PHOTO: Chief defence scientist Dr Alex Zelinsky (left), former WRESAT worker Peter Fietz and Senator Anne Ruston at a commemorative event for the 50th anniversary of the launch. (Department of Defence: David Cotton)

Mr Forbes said the time between launch and orbit was tense for his team.

"After a few minutes, there was an announcement: 'WRESAT is in orbit', and I was more than a bit excited," he said.

"And that night at the Woomera mess, I was one of the young fellas at the back who was wolf-whistling and shouting while the Minister and all sorts of VIPs tried their best to congratulate us."


PHOTO: The instrumental layout of the WRESAT satellite in the Department of Supply report into the launch. (National Archives of Australia)

More space exploration possible from Woomera

Australia's chief defence scientist, Dr Alex Zelinsky, said the 1967 launch was a significant moment in Australian science.

"Only two other countries had launched satellites — the US and the USSR, and then us," he said.

"That's extraordinary when you think about it."

But Dr Zelinsky is uncertain whether Woomera could host launches again in the future.


PHOTO: The cover of a report into the WRESAT launch by the Department of Supply. (Supplied: National Archives of Australia)

"I think it could, but it's not really necessary," he said.

"At the time, it was the place because we were launching the rockets for a program we had with the US and the UK and then we stopped launching rockets there for 50 years."

Dr Zelinsky said being able to launch rockets was not vital to a space industry in Australia.

"In the end, it's just the launch that gets you there; it's the payload that's important and what the payload does," he said.

But Mr Fietz said he wished Australia had maintained its space capabilities as it had all the manufacturing and electronic facilities.

"We don't have that anymore, and there's a certain sadness about that," he said.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-11-29/50-years-since-first-satellite-launch-wresat/9205878

https://australiascience.tv/wresat-australias-first-satellite/
https://www.dst.defence.gov.au/news/2017/11/08/50th-anniversary-australias-first-satellite
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WRESAT

O  satelicie OSCAR 5 zbudowanym przez studentów w artykułach astronautycznych
« Ostatnia zmiana: Styczeń 02, 2018, 00:33 wysłana przez Orionid »

Offline Orionid

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Odp: Australijski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #5 dnia: Maj 20, 2018, 15:23 »
Powstała Australijska Agencja Kosmiczna
BY MICHAŁ MOROZ ON 19 MAJA 2018

8 maja rząd Australii ogłosił powołanie Australijskiej Agencji Kosmicznej. Nowa instytucja będzie wspierać rozwój podmiotów kosmicznych w tym kraju.

Historia badań kosmicznych w Australii sięga lat 60. Kraj ten jako siódmy umieścił własnego satelitę (WRESAT) na orbicie. Start wykonano w 1967 z bazy Woomera za pomocą rakiety Sparta, której konstrukcja bazowała na amerykańskiej rakiecie balistycznej Redstone. Z Woomera przeprowadzono również starty rakiety Europa 1, które rozwijała ELDO (European Launcher Development Organization), będąca jedną z prekursorów Europejskiej Agencji Kosmicznej. Nie udało się jednak osiągnąć orbity i program zarzucono.

Na terenie południowo-wschodniej Australii od 1965 roku funkcjonuje również system anten w Canberra, wchodzący w skład Deep Space Network monitorujący komunikację w misjami badającymi Układ Słoneczny. Anteny nasłuchiwały między innymi misji Apollo, Viking czy Voyager. Na zachodzie kraju w New Norcia swój system nasłuchowy posiada również Europejska Agencja Kosmiczna. (...)

https://kosmonauta.net/2018/05/powstala-australijska-agencja-kosmiczna/
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Australian_Space_Agency_Lost_In_Canberra_999.html
https://industry.gov.au/INDUSTRY/IndustrySectors/SPACE/Pages/default.aspx
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-05-03/australia-space-agency-funding-in-federal-budget-2018/9720370

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_oyx3EfwAws" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_oyx3EfwAws</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_oyx3EfwAws
« Ostatnia zmiana: Maj 20, 2018, 16:24 wysłana przez Orionid »

Offline Orionid

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Odp: Australijski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #6 dnia: Maj 20, 2018, 16:30 »
Czy to już oficjalne logo agencji ?
Interesująco się prezentuje  :)

Offline Orionid

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Odp: Australijski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #7 dnia: Maj 20, 2018, 17:48 »
Satelita kalibracyjny opracowany na  australijskim uniwersytecie UNSW ( The University of New South Wales) został wystrzelony 18.11.2017.
Udało się pozyskać zdjęcie  dwuelementowego Buccaneera.

UNSW Canberra launches first satellite into space
27.11.17

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Kri0NNUck0" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Kri0NNUck0</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Kri0NNUck0

UNSW ( The University of New South Wales) Canberra has launched its first miniature satellite into orbit from the United States, achieving another important milestone in growing Australia’s space sector. (...)
https://www.unsw.adfa.edu.au/space-research/news/unsw-canberra-launches-first-satellite-space#

UNSW Canberra captures first image of the Buccaneer in orbit
6.12.17


https://www.unsw.adfa.edu.au/space-research/news/unsw-canberra-captures-first-image-buccaneer-orbit

Buccaneer RRM / Buccaneer

Offline Orionid

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Odp: Australijski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #8 dnia: Lipiec 14, 2019, 23:53 »
1 lipca 2019 minął roczek od rozpoczęcia działalności ASA.
Dogodne położenie geograficzne tego kontynentu może sprzyjać prowadzeniu badań mikrograwitacyjnych przy użyciu rakiet sondujących.


To carve out a niche in space industries, Australia should focus on microgravity research rockets
June 30, 2019 8.30pm BS

(...) Thanks to the proximity of northern Australia to the equator and expertise in ground station operation, Australia has an opportunity to carve out a niche in launching sounding rockets to conduct microgravity research.
http://theconversation.com/to-carve-out-a-niche-in-space-industries-australia-should-focus-on-microgravity-research-rockets-119225

https://www.industry.gov.au/strategies-for-the-future/australian-space-agency

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Odp: Australijski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #9 dnia: Sierpień 04, 2019, 11:05 »
Pojawiły się 4 propozycje wypraw dotyczących Księżyca, m. in.lądownik i orbiter , które mają za zadanie wydobywanie wody.
Uważa się, że ziemski rozwinięty  przemysł wydobywczy tego kraju pozwala na wykorzystanie swojego znaczenia na Księżycu.


Australia can pick up its game and land a Moon mission
August 1, 2019

(...) Labor MP Peter Khalil has already called for Australia to be involved in a mission to the Moon, and later to Mars. He is co-chair of the recently reformed Parliamentary Friends of Space, along with the National’s MP Kevin Hogan.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5aDbDO5Ox8" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5aDbDO5Ox8</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5aDbDO5Ox8


Australia has reacted quite quickly to this evolving environment. Only last month, the first workshop met to establish a Remote Operations Institute in Western Australia to look at operating automated machines at a distance - remote mines and space.

The CSIRO identified nine potential “nation-building” flagship space missions, of which four relate to the Moon. One (disclosure, championed by me) is an orbiter and lander aimed at extracting water, but the other three could all support such a mission. Of those nine, four (including mine) have been selected for further examination at a workshop in mid-August in Brisbane.

Since January, we have been working on the Wilde project, where we have re-focussed our space resources research towards the permanently shadowed craters at the Moon’s poles, where water is highly likely to occur in acceptable concentrations.

We are also looking to reduce the risk of investing in a water extraction venture, including the design of orbiter and lander missions. (...)

The other important driver for the new space projects mentioned above is that Australia has such a strong mining industry, and that so much mining innovation is created in Australia.

As disciplines, space and mining have a lot in common: both involve complex engineering systems, work in hostile environments, and human control is increasingly handed over to autonomous robotics. Exploiting resources in space represents a genuine opportunity for Australia to establish a niche around which a sustainable space industry can be built.

So now is a perfect time for Australia to consider a new Moon mission. The industry is growing rapidly and a flagship mission would give it something around which to build. (...)

http://theconversation.com/australia-can-pick-up-its-game-and-land-a-moon-mission-121109

Offline Adam.Przybyla

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Odp: Australijski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #10 dnia: Sierpień 04, 2019, 11:38 »
Oni sa w tym bardzo dobrzy. Maja cale kopalnei dzialajace bez udzialu czlowieka, tz operatorzy steruja tym zdalnie
z odleglosci wielu kilometrow. Z powazaniem
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Odp: Australijski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #11 dnia: Wrzesień 03, 2019, 20:08 »
Początek współpracy ESA i ASA
BY KRZYSZTOF KANAWKA ON 3 WRZEŚNIA 2019

https://kosmonauta.net/2019/09/poczatek-wspolpracy-esa-i-asa/
« Ostatnia zmiana: Wrzesień 03, 2019, 22:30 wysłana przez Orionid »

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Odp: Australijski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #12 dnia: Wrzesień 25, 2019, 22:52 »
Australia to cooperate with NASA on lunar exploration
by Jeff Foust — September 23, 2019


NASA Deputy Administrator Jim Morhard (left) and Megan Clark, head of the Australian Space Agency, sign the agreement Sept. 21 while Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross (standing, left) and Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison look on. Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky

WAILEA, Hawaii — NASA signed an agreement with its Australian counterpart Sept. 21 to cooperate on NASA’s Artemis program as Australia seeks to further boost its space industry.

In a ceremony at NASA Headquarters, the two space agencies signed a “joint statement of intent” regarding cooperation on NASA’s plans to return humans to the moon. The event was attended by leadership of the two agencies as well as Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross.

What roles Australia will plan in the Artemis program or other exploration initiatives remain to be determined. NASA, in a statement about the agreement, envisioned Australia contributing “in areas of mutual interest such as robotics, automation, and remote asset management,” building on its capabilities in mining.

“It will give Australian businesses a chance to compete for a place in growing international space supply chains,” Morrison said in remarks at the signing ceremony. “The Australian Space Agency will work with NASA on how it can support a significant part of its mission.” That work, he added, could include lunar surface systems or capabilities for the lunar Gateway.

Morrison also used the speech to announce the Australian government will spend $150 million Australian ($102 million) over the next five years in support of “the mission and related activities,” he said, hinting that funding could grow. “I expect that’s just where we’re going to begin.”

Exactly how that money will be spent is uncertain. A statement from the Australian government said the additional funding would go “into our local businesses and new technologies that will support NASA on its inspirational campaign to return to the Moon and travel to Mars.”

The Australian Space Agency, in its own statement, said the investment would, in part, support pilot projects and demonstrations of “investment-ready” Australian technologies that could support space activities, which in turn could support cooperation with NASA and other space agencies and aid Australian space companies win business.

The agreement and funding announcements are the latest signs of growing support for Australia’s space industry. The Australian Space Agency formally started operations in July 2018 after years of efforts by space industry advocates in the country to establish an agency. Among other activities, the agency recently finished work on a new set of regulations intended to make it easier for companies to perform launches in the country.

https://spacenews.com/australia-to-cooperate-with-nasa-on-lunar-exploration/
« Ostatnia zmiana: Wrzesień 25, 2019, 22:54 wysłana przez Orionid »