Autor Wątek: Donald Herod Peterson, Sr. (1933-2018)  (Przeczytany 1655 razy)

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Donald Herod Peterson, Sr. (1933-2018)
« dnia: Maj 28, 2018, 18:11 »
Właśnie Stowarzyszenie Uczestników Lotów Kosmicznych (ASE) ogłosiło, że 27.05. w wieku 84 lat zmarł były astronauta NASA Donald Herod Peterson, Sr.

Cześć jego pamięci.

« Ostatnia zmiana: Maj 28, 2018, 18:17 wysłana przez mss »
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Odp: Donald Herod Peterson, Sr. (1933-2018)
« Odpowiedź #1 dnia: Maj 28, 2018, 19:29 »
Już drugi raz zdarza się , że dzień po dniu odchodzą ci, który Tam byli.
Już połowa załogi pierwszej misji Challengera nie żyje  :(

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Odp: Donald Herod Peterson, Sr. (1933-2018)
« Odpowiedź #2 dnia: Maj 28, 2018, 20:03 »
Kogo masz na myśli za pierwszym razem?
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Odp: Donald Herod Peterson, Sr. (1933-2018)
« Odpowiedź #3 dnia: Maj 28, 2018, 20:47 »
Kogo masz na myśli za pierwszym razem?

Jednak tego samego dnia zmarli i to w rocznicę urodzin Mikołaja Kopernika.
Walerij Nikołajewicz Kubasow
Dale Allan Gardner

Opierałem się wcześniej pewnie na wersji pierwotnej na żółtych stronach. (19 i 20 lutego)

Polskie Forum Astronautyczne

Odp: Donald Herod Peterson, Sr. (1933-2018)
« Odpowiedź #3 dnia: Maj 28, 2018, 20:47 »

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Odp: Donald Herod Peterson, Sr. (1933-2018)
« Odpowiedź #4 dnia: Maj 28, 2018, 21:15 »
http://www.americaspace.com/2018/05/28/don-peterson-first-shuttle-spacewalker-dies-aged-84/

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Don Peterson, First Shuttle Spacewalker, Dies Aged 84
By Ben Evans



Don Peterson (right) eats and confers with Commander Paul “P.J.” Weitz during STS-6. Weitz died last year. Photo Credit: NASA, via Joachim Becker/SpaceFacts.de

Veteran astronaut Don Peterson, who flew aboard STS-6, the maiden voyage of orbiter Challenger, performed the first-ever spacewalk from the shuttle airlock and might—had the hands of fate turned differently—have launched to the Air Force’s classified Manned Orbiting Laboratory (MOL), died Sunday (27 May). He was 84. Coming only days after the passing of Apollo Moonwalker and Skylab veteran Alan Bean, Peterson’s death deprives the world of yet another member of the “old guard” of pioneering U.S. astronauts. “So sad to report that we have lost another member of the astronaut family,” the Association of Space Explorers (ASE) noted Monday on its Facebook page. “Fair skies and tailwinds, Don.”


The STS-6 astronauts undertake slide wire basket training at Pad 39A during their Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). From left to right are Karol “Bo” Bobko, Paul Weitz (partially obscured), Story Musgrave (facing camera) and Don Peterson. Photo Credit: NASA, via Joachim Becker/SpaceFacts.de

Donald Herod Peterson was born in Winona, Miss., on 22 October 1933, and grew up loving adventure stories and science fiction. His next-door neighbor, Joe Glenn, a Second World War II fighter ace and veteran pilot of the Lockheed P-38 Lightning, offered Peterson his first glimpse of the aviation world. “He was kind of a town hero,” Peterson later recalled in his NASA oral history. “Since he lived next door, I could go visit with him and he used to talk about flying.” At high school, the young boy gravitated towards mathematics and physics and entered the Military Academy at West Point, N.Y., to study science. He earned his degree in 1955 and spent the next four years as an instructor pilot in the Air Training Command, performing formation and instrument flying and aerobatics. Years later, Peterson credited those years as pivotal in enabling him to enter test-pilot school.

He was detailed to follow a nuclear-powered aircraft program and a master’s degree in nuclear engineering at the Air Force Institute of Technology at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio. Unfortunately, six months before Peterson graduated, the program was canceled. He moved into technical intelligence, with a focus on nuclear reactor systems and served as a fighter pilot with Tactical Air Command, before entering the Aerospace Research Pilots School at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. In June 1967, Peterson was selected as one of four pilots in the third group for the Air Force’s ill-fated MOL program, a military space station for orbital surveillance and reconnaissance. He participated in water and jungle survival training and later recalled that, such was the classification of MOL, he was required to travel around the United States on false identification papers.


The STS-6 crew participate in a training session in the flight deck simulator. Peterson sits at the bottom-right side of the picture. Photo Credit: NASA

As MOL guzzled ever more money, and unmanned spy satellites became ever more capable, the space station program was canceled by President Richard Nixon in June 1969. Three months later, Peterson and six other ex-MOL pilots—including his future STS-6 crewmate Karol “Bo” Bobko—were hired by NASA into its astronaut corps. Part of the reason was that NASA needed Air Force support to gain Congressional approval for the shuttle program. “It won’t hurt,” NASA Associate Administrator for Manned Space Flight George Mueller told Deke Slayton, the head of Flight Crew Operations, “to make [the Air Force] happy, just this once!”

However, as Project Apollo wound down, there were few flight assignments for the new astronauts and Slayton selected only the candidates who were younger than 36 years old. By September 1969, Peterson was a few weeks shy of the deadline and, luckily, barely made the cut. He worked on the support for Apollo 16 in April 1972—the second-to-last manned lunar landing mission—before being reassigned to work on testing the avionics, computers, guidance equipment, navigation controls and air data systems for the shuttle. Working with fellow ex-MOL selectee Hank Hartsfield, Peterson helped devise techniques for a manually-controlled shuttle ascent. He retired from the Air Force as a colonel in 1979 and remained with NASA as a civilian astronaut.


Weitz (seated) is flanked by Don Peterson (kneeling) and Musgrave (standing left) and Bobko (standing right) in the STS-6 crew’s F-Troop gag portrait. Photo Credit: NASA

In March 1982, Peterson was named as a Mission Specialist on STS-6, targeted to be the maiden flight of shuttle Challenger and scheduled for launch in January of the following year. Teamed with Commander Paul “P.J.” Weitz, Pilot Karol “Bo” Bobko and Mission Specialist Story Musgrave, the quartet dived into training for a two-day mission to deploy the first of NASA’s powerful Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS). However, STS-6 changed beyond recognition in November 1982, when the sickness and space suit problems left the crew of STS-5 unable to perform the first shuttle-based spacewalk. At short notice, Peterson and Musgrave were assigned to do a four-hour spacewalk on STS-6. To accommodate this complex new objective, their mission was extended to five days.

“It didn’t give us much time to train,” recalled Peterson. “I didn’t have much experience in the suit, but the advantage we had was that Story was the astronaut office’s point of contact for the suit development, so he knew everything there was to know. He’d spent 400 hours in the water tank, so he didn’t really have to be trained.”


Challenger roars into orbit on her maiden voyage. Photo Credit: NASA

After several delays, Challenger rocketed into orbit on 4 April 1983. The astronauts informally labeled themselves “The F Troop”, in recognition of the fact that they were the sixth shuttle crew, and Weitz arranged for gag photographs of them with Civil War attire—cavalry hats, braces and red-and-white neckties—together with lever-action rifles, bugles, swords and cavalry flags. Although NASA did not appreciate the humor, the crew found it hilarious. However, with an average age of 48, the astronauts on STS-6 were one of the oldest crews ever launched…and their younger colleagues decided to nickname them “The Geritol Bunch”, after the dietary supplement famously associated with aging.

By his own admission, Peterson’s spacewalk training had been rushed and he was underwater for only 15-20 occasions, “and that’s not really enough to know everything you need to know”. Yet his four hours outside Challenger with Musgrave ran very smoothly. The two men practiced moving themselves along slide wires fixed to the payload bay sills and evaluated a hand-cranked winch to manually close the payload bay doors in an emergency. At one point, during a high metabolic period, whilst working with a ratchet wrench, Peterson received a high oxygen usage alarm on his suit. It was later attributed to a flexion-induced leak in the suit, coupled with his high work rate. The alarm quickly cleared and did not recur. As luck would have it, the alarm occurred whilst Challenger was out of direct communication with the ground, so the astronauts continued their tasks. “They weren’t watching at the time that happened,” Peterson said later. “By the time we dumped the data from the computers to the ground that showed the leak, we were back inside the orbiter.”


Story Musgrave (left) and Don Peterson perform the Shuttle program’s first EVA. The large tilt-table, used earlier in the mission to deploy the first Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, is visible in the background. Photo Credit: NASA

Almost certainly, had Mission Control spotted the alarm in real time, Musgrave and Peterson would have been immediately directed back to the airlock.

The view was truly spectacular. “The shuttle flies with the payload bay towards Earth all the time, but we thought it would be neat when we got on the dark side if we could look out at the night sky and see all the stars,” remembered Peterson. “We did better than that. When we were on the daylight side, we went into the Ferris-wheel mode. Just like a Ferris-wheel seat goes around and never changes attitude, we went around the world, holding one attitude, so when we got on the dark side we faced exactly away. We got some beautiful pictures of Earth from different attitudes that we couldn’t have done otherwise.”

Peterson retired from NASA in November 1984 to enter aerospace consultancy. At the end of his career, he had logged in excess of 5,300 hours of flying time, including more than 5,000 hours in jet aircraft. With STS-6, he also logged five days in space and four hours of spacewalking time. His passing comes only a few months after the death of his STS-6 crewmate Paul “P.J.” Weitz and AmericaSpace extends its sincere condolences to his family at this time.

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Odp: Donald Herod Peterson, Sr. (1933-2018)
« Odpowiedź #5 dnia: Maj 28, 2018, 22:06 »
https://kosmonauta.net/2018/05/odchodza-weterani-pierwszych-lotow-kosmicznych/

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Odchodzą weterani pierwszych lotów kosmicznych

By Michał Moroz on 28 maja 2018


W odstępstwie jednego dnia zmarło dwóch amerykańskich astronautów, Alan Bean, czwarty człowiek na Księżycu oraz Don Peterson, uczestnik pierwszego lotu Challengera.
Obu astronautów różniło tylko półtora roku. Alan Bean urodził się w marcu 1932 roku, zaś Don Peterson w październiku 1933 roku. Brali jednak udział w całkowicie innych programach lotów załogowych USA.

Bean został przyjęty do trzeciej grupy astronautów NASA w 1963 roku. Brał udział w dwóch lotach kosmicznych, Apollo 12 oraz Skylab SL3. Jako pilot lądownika księżycowego w listopadzie 1969 roku jako czwarty człowiek postawił stopę na Księżycu. Wraz z Pete Conradem wylądowali na Oceanie Burz w pobliżu lądownika Surveyor 3, która osiadła na Księżycu dwa i pół roku wcześniej. Na orbicie Księżyca w kapsule Apollo pozostał zaś Richard Gordan – obecnie ostatni żyjący weteran misji Apollo 12.
(...)

https://kosmonauta.net/2017/11/zmarl-richard-gordon/
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Odp: Donald Herod Peterson, Sr. (1933-2018)
« Odpowiedź #6 dnia: Maj 28, 2018, 23:35 »
http://www.collectspace.com/news/news-052818a-astronaut-donald-peterson-obituary.html

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Astronaut Don Peterson, made first shuttle spacewalk, dies at 84

May 28, 2018

— Astronaut Donald Peterson, who trained for a classified military space station program before becoming one of the first people to spacewalk from the space shuttle, has died.

Peterson's death on Sunday (May 27) at age 84 was noted by the Association of Space Explorers, a professional society for individuals who have flown in space.

"So sad to report that we have lost another member of the astronaut family," wrote the association on its Facebook page on Monday. "Fair skies and tailwinds, Don."

Peterson transferred to NASA in September 1969, two years after he was chosen by the U.S. Air Force among its third group of candidate pilots to crew the planned Manned Orbiting Laboratory (MOL). The clandestine reconnaissance platform was canceled however, before it could be launched, leading to Peterson and several of his fellow MOL trainees joining NASA's astronaut corps.

"You might think that there was a lot of— I mean, a bunch of screening and testing and all that. As far as I know, there was none," Peterson recounted in a NASA oral history in 2002. "There were fourteen people who were crew on the MOL program, and they took the seven youngest people."

"I am sure they did that because they figured it would be a while before we'd get a chance to fly," he said.

Arriving at the civilian space agency in the midst of the Apollo program, Peterson in fact waited 14 years for his opportunity to fly into space, ultimately being named to the maiden crew of the space shuttle Challenger.


(...)
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Odp: Donald Herod Peterson, Sr. (1933-2018)
« Odpowiedź #7 dnia: Maj 29, 2018, 06:58 »
Fragment obszernych wspomnień astronauty:

Donald H. Peterson
Interviewed by Jennifer Ross-Nazzal

Houston, Texas – 14 November 2002

NASA Johnson Space Center Oral History Project
Edited Oral History Transcript


(...) Ross-Nazzal: Well, let’s talk about your flight, your Space Shuttle flight. When did you learn that you were selected for this crew?

Peterson: This is going to surprise you, but, you know, I don’t know. I don’t remember. Our flight got delayed. We trained for about, as I remember, thirteen months, and we were all ready to go, and then they had a hydrogen leak, and they couldn’t find it. We then got, like, a two- or two-and-a-half-month delay, and so we just kept on training. So we were in training for a long, long time.

So I had to have been told sixteen, seventeen, eighteen months before the time we actually flew, because we trained sixteen or seventeen months, all told. Of course, you had to know you were on the crew before you’d start training. But I don’t remember exactly how I found out. I don’t know whether [George W. S.] Abbey called or Paul [J.] Weitz called. Somebody called on the phone and said, “I offer you a flight on STS-6 if you want to do that,” and it was always that kind of thing.

But as I remember, it wasn’t a huge big deal. I mean, I just figured sooner or later I’d get a chance to fly, and when it came along, obviously [I accepted]. Now, we didn’t know at the time, we didn’t know until very late in the training cycle that we were going to do a space walk. That was not planned. That happened because the spacesuits on the flight before ours, both of the suits failed, and those guys could not do the space walk that they were supposed to do.

It’s kind of funny, George Abbey, I think, had some people already picked out that he wanted to have the honor of doing the first space walk, and when that cancelled, he said, “Well, we’ll have to slip now. It’ll take months to get another crew ready.” Jim Abrahamson, who’s an old friend of mine, was the [Associate] Administrator. He called me on the phone and said, “Can you and Story do the space walk?”

And I said, “Yeah.”

So he said, “Okay. We’re going to do it on the next flight.”

Well, it didn’t give us much time to train. I didn’t have very much experience in the suit, but the advantage we had was, Story was the Astronaut Office point of contact for the suit development, so Story knew everything about the suit there was to know. Story had spent, like, 400 hours in the suit in the water tank, so he didn’t really have to be trained. He probably knew as much as anybody on the training team about that.

Now, my training was pretty rushed, pretty hurried. I think I was in the water, I don’t know, fifteen, twenty times, but that’s really not enough to really know everything you need to know. But, see, all we were doing was testing the suit, testing the airlock, so we weren’t really doing anything that was critical to the survival of the vehicle. We were just testing equipment, and the deal was, if something went wrong, you’d just stop and come back inside. So the fact that I wasn’t highly skilled in the suit really didn’t matter that much.

It’s interesting, I think, that my suit leaked pretty badly for a while [about twenty seconds] and then stopped, and the ground didn’t know that at the time, or they’d have told us to stop.

I was working with a ratchet wrench. We were just testing tools and stuff. We had launched a satellite out of a big collar that’s mounted in the back of the Orbiter, and the collar was tilted forty-five degrees. It had to be tilted back down before we could close the payload bay doors and come home. So instead of driving it with the electric motors, they said, “Let’s go back and see if we can crank it down with a wrench, to simulate a failure. Suppose it failed, and we’ll see if we can do that.”

So that was one of my jobs. We had foot restraints, but it took so long to set them up and move them around, that we didn’t want to do that. So I just held on with one hand, actually, to a piece of sheet metal, which is not the best way to hold on, and cranked the wrench with my other hand, and my legs floated out behind me. So as I cranked, my legs were flailing back and forth, like a swimmer, to react the load on the wrench. The waist ring was rotating back and forth, and the seal in the waist ring popped out, and the suit leaked bad enough to set off the alarms.

[We did not know] what it was. I stopped and said, “I’ve got an alarm.” Story stopped what he was doing and came over. We were trying to check what was going on, and the seal popped back in place and the leak stopped. So we went ahead and finished the EVA.

Now, in those days we didn’t have constant contact with the ground. They didn’t see that. They weren’t watching at the time that that happened. They didn’t have any way to watch. By the time we dumped the data from the computer to the ground that showed that leak, we were already back inside the Orbiter. Then they called up, and they were all upset about what happened here and what was that.

We said, “Well, we really don’t know. We got an alarm. The alarm stayed on for about twenty seconds or so, and then it went off, and everything seemed okay. So we just finished what we were doing. I mean, everything seemed all right.”

Well, the next story I was told was that “You were working so hard that you were breathing so much oxygen, that you depleted the oxygen in the suit and forced a higher feed level and that set off the alarm.” Well, I talked to some of the doctors, and they said, “We don’t think that’s right.”

Well, my heart rate was very high. Working in the suit’s very hard. My heart rate was 192, okay, when I was cranking that wrench, so I was working very hard at the time. But a guy my size can’t work hard enough to breathe enough oxygen to set off the alarm that way. We didn’t find out what that was, really find out what that was for, like, two years, because they just sort of said, “No, we think you just breathed up too much oxygen. Don’t worry about it,” and nobody really did.

Before you fly, you put your suit on. The suit’s so heavy, you can’t hardly stand up in it. So they put you in a sling that holds up the weight, and they put you in a vacuum chamber on a treadmill, and they let you walk the treadmill. That’s just to exercise the suit, because each suit’s a little different. They make funny noises, and the valves open and close a little different, and they want you to get used to that.

[Before] Shannon [W.] Lucid [flew, she was testing her suit.] So she’s walking on the treadmill, and all of a sudden her suit—the alarm went off. What it says is, the oxygen flow rate’s too high, and that means that you’re pumping oxygen from the tank into the suit, but that also means the oxygen is going somewhere. It’s going out of the suit somewhere. So they knew they had a leak, in her case, and they could also see the oxygen coming into the vacuum chamber, because they were getting pressure inside the chamber.

She stopped walking, and when she stopped walking and stood around a little, the leak stopped. There was a technician sitting there. These guys amaze me, but he looked at that, and he said, “You know, I’ve seen this same thing before. I don’t remember the details, but I’ve seen this same phenomenon before.” They went back and got the video of my flight and looked at it. He said—and this is kind of interesting—he said when Shannon Lucid was walking, since she’s a woman, her hips swivel, and her suit was actually rotating, and we’d never seen that with a guy because guys don’t walk that way. But he said, “That’s the same thing that happened to Peterson’s suit two years ago.”

So then they went in and changed the seals and all and fixed the problem. But it always amazed me that those guys were dedicated enough to have that kind of memory fixed in their heads, and as soon he saw that, he said, “I don’t know where I saw this. I’ve seen this before. I don’t remember where, but I’ll go find out,” and sure enough, he did, went back and went through a lot of film and said, “Looks just like this, doesn’t it?”

Of course, I got a lot of insulting calls from that guy. “You know, your hips move just like Shannon’s.”

I said, “Not for you.” [Laughter]

Ross-Nazzal: Well, you mentioned that you did the first Space Shuttle EVA.

Peterson: Yes, that was fun.  (...)

https://www.jsc.nasa.gov/history/oral_histories/PetersonDH/PetersonDH_11-14-02.htm

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Odp: Donald Harod Peterson, Sr. (1933-2018)
« Odpowiedź #8 dnia: Czerwiec 01, 2018, 00:36 »
Parę fotek z Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex z remembrance ceremony for Don Peterson (30.05.2018):


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Odp: Donald Herod Peterson, Sr. (1933-2018)
« Odpowiedź #9 dnia: Czerwiec 01, 2018, 18:37 »
Donald Peterson Sr., who spacewalked from the shuttle Challenger, dies at 84
By Ellie Silverman May 29 2018

Donald H. Peterson Sr., an astronaut who served on the maiden voyage of the space shuttle Challenger and performed a spacewalk to test the ability of repairing the vehicle while it orbited more than 170 miles above the Earth, died May 27 at his home in El Lago, Tex. He was 84.

The cause was Alzheimer’s disease and bone cancer, said a daughter, Shari Peterson.

An Air Force veteran, Mr. Peterson joined NASA’s astronaut corps in September 1969, two months after Neil Armstrong led the historic first landing on the moon. Fourteen years later, Mr. Peterson joined the crew of the sixth NASA space shuttle mission — and the Challenger’s first flight. (The shuttle exploded in 1986 while on its 10th mission.)

Soviet and American astronauts had conducted spacewalks since 1965, but the ability to exit the shuttle was an important step toward being able to perform repair and maintenance work on a space vehicle.

Mr. Peterson and fellow mission specialist Story Musgrave dressed in 250-pound white spacesuits with attached backpacks that allowed for greater mobility.

Before exiting the Challenger, Mr. Peterson had to breathe pure oxygen for three-and-a-half hours, to gradually reduce excess nitrogen from his body. This was done to avoid decompression sickness, a condition similar to what scuba divers experience when changing air pressures too rapidly.

The fresh oxygen made a “nice whishing sound,” so Mr. Peterson turned his receiver down and fell into “probably the best sleep I had on orbit,” he recalled in a NASA oral-history interview in 2002. “People asked, ‘How in the world can you sleep just before you’re getting ready to go?’ I said, ‘Well, you know, you get tired enough, you can sleep almost anywhere.’ ”

By 4:30 p.m., Mr. Peterson and Musgrave were in the 60-foot cargo bay, checking maintenance materials that future crews would need to preserve and, if necessary, repair the spacecraft. For about four hours, they appeared to move “like underwater swimmers” as the shuttle orbited the Earth at 17,500 mph, The Washington Post reported at the time.

The men were roped to the shuttle’s cargo bay while they tested their ability to carry a weighted bag, use a hand winch and perform other tasks.

After launching a satellite, the crew decided they should test what would happen if the electronic motors powering the ability to tilt the collar at the back of the Orbiter stopped working.

“We had foot restraints, but it took so long to set them up and move them around, that we didn’t want to do that,” Mr. Peterson said in the NASA interview. “So I just held on with one hand, actually, to a piece of sheet metal, which is not the best way to hold on, and cranked the wrench with my other hand, and my legs floated out behind me. So as I cranked, my legs were flailing back and forth, like a swimmer, to react the load on the wrench.”

During this test, his suit started to leak. “I’ve got an alarm,” he told Musgrave.

“Story stopped what he was doing and came over,” Mr. Peterson recalled. “We were trying to check what was going on, and the seal popped back in place and the leak stopped.” They then finished the procedure.

Donald Herod Peterson was born in Winona, Miss., on Oct. 22, 1933. His father ran a service station and sold furniture . Mr. Peterson’s avid consumption of science fiction in his childhood drove his interest in aviation and space.

He graduated in 1955 from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y., and in 1962 he received a master’s degree in nuclear engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio.

Early in his military career, he worked for the Air Training Command as a flight instructor and for the Air Force Systems Command as a nuclear systems analyst.

He served 24 years in the Air Force before retiring at the rank of colonel. After leaving NASA in 1984, he became a consultant on manned aerospace operations. His awards included the Meritorious Service Medal and the Air Force Commendation Medal.

His wife of nearly 60 years, the former Bonnie Ruth Love, died in 2017. In addition to his daughter, of League City, Tex., survivors include two other children, Don Peterson Jr. of Fort Worth and Jean Stone of San Antonio; a brother; four grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/donald-peterson-sr-who-spacewalked-from-the-shuttle-challenger-dies-at-84/2018/05/29/d1d8d148-634d-11e8-a69c-b944de66d9e7_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.95e594051cf0

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Odp: Donald Herod Peterson, Sr. (1933-2018)
« Odpowiedź #10 dnia: Czerwiec 01, 2018, 20:43 »
Wspomnienie na stronie NASA
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/nasa-remembers-shuttle-astronaut-don-peterson

NASA Remembers Shuttle Astronaut Don Peterson
May 29, 2018

NASA today is remembering Don Peterson, who flew aboard the first flight of the Space Shuttle Challenger and took part in the first spacewalk of the shuttle program. His May 27 death was reported by the Association of Space Explorers on its Facebook page.

His mission, STS-6, launched from Kennedy Space Center, Fla., on April 4, 1983. The other crew members were commander Paul J. Weitz, pilot Karol J. Bobko and mission specialist Story Musgrave. During the flight, the crew conducted numerous experiments in materials processing, recorded lightning activities and deployed the first Tracking and Data Relay Satellite. Peterson and Musgrave conducted a spacewalk to test the new suit, the Shuttle airlock and new tools and techniques for construction and repair outside a spacecraft. After 120 hours of orbital operations, the mission landed April 9.

Peterson was born in Winona, Miss., on Oct. 22, 1933. He graduated from Winona City High School and received a bachelor of science degree from the United States Military Academy at West Point, N.Y., in 1955. He earned a master’s degree in Nuclear Engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, in 1962.

Over his career, he was awarded the Air Force Commendation Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal and the JSC Group Achievement Award.

After graduating from West Point, Peterson completed a variety of assignments. He spent four years as a flight instructor and military training officer with the Air Training Command. The Air Force Systems Command utilized him as a nuclear systems analyst for three years. He also served as a fighter pilot with Tactical Air Command for one year, including three months of combat weapons training. He was a graduate of the Aerospace Research Pilot School, Edwards Air Force Base, California, and was one of the third group of astronauts assigned to the Air Force's Manned Orbiting Laboratory Program. He logged more than 5,300 hours of flying time--including more than 5,000 hours in jet aircraft.

Peterson became a NASA astronaut in September 1969 and served on the astronaut support crew for Apollo 16. Peterson retired from the Air Force with the rank of colonel after more than 24 years of active service, but he continued his assignment as a NASA astronaut in a civilian capacity. His areas of responsibility included engineering support, man/machine interface and safety assessment.

Peterson resigned from the Astronaut Office in November 1984, working after that as a consultant in manned aerospace operations.

https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_1850.html

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Odp: Donald Herod Peterson, Sr. (1933-2018)
« Odpowiedź #11 dnia: Czerwiec 01, 2018, 20:55 »
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Odp: Donald Herod Peterson, Sr. (1933-2018)
« Odpowiedź #12 dnia: Czerwiec 01, 2018, 22:56 »
http://www.crowderfuneralhome.com/obituaries/donald-h-peterson-sr/

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Donald H. Peterson, Sr.

Colonel Donald H. Peterson (AF Ret.)
Oct. 22, 1933 – May 27, 2018
Born in Winona, Mississippi to Henry W. and Mabel Strickland Peterson, Don and his younger brother Gil grew up in a small town where everyone knew each other, all worked hard for a living, and were willing to give their neighbor a helping hand when needed. It was a simpler time, no AC, TV, computers or jet airplanes. Growing up Don loved to read, (mostly science fiction) and play outdoors using his vivid imagination; with friends he stayed in touch with his entire life. He would later tell his own children that as a young boy he had reoccurring dreams of flying, without the aid of wings or a plane, just soaring above the Earth. This dream set him on a quest for knowledge to discover the universe and its secrets.
It was while attending Winona High School that Don excelled in math and science. He credits his math teacher, Ruth Smith, with recognizing his gift and providing individual math instruction beyond the curriculum the small high school offered, enabling him to achieve the education needed for college admittance and scholarships.
His hard work paid off and after high school graduation he received an appointment to West Point. At the age of 17, Don boarded a train and headed out of his small Mississippi community to attend The Military Academy at West Point in New York. He graduated with a Bachelor of Science Degree in 1955 receiving his diploma from President Dwight D. Eisenhower and began his Air Force career. He would later earn his Masters Degree in Nuclear Engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology in 1962.
While serving in the Air Force and stationed in Greenville, Miss., Don met Bonnie Love. They married in 1957. They were together nearly 60 years and raised three children, Don Jr., Jean, and Shari. Later, their spouses, four grandchildren, and four great grandchildren would join in the family gatherings.
Don’s Air Force career would last 24 years until he retired with the rank of Colonel. During this journey, Don would achieve many accomplishments. He went to test pilot school at Edwards AF Base and in 1967 was one of the third group of astronauts selected for the Air Force Manned Orbiting Laboratory Program.(MOL). When this program was canceled, Don became a NASA astronaut in 1969.
Don moved his family to El Lago, TX. to begin his NASA training. He would remain here until the day he died. While with NASA he served on the Apollo 16 Support Crew, and in 1983 flew on the Space Shuttle Challenger (STS 6) with crew members Commander Paul Weitz, Pilot Col. Karol Bobko, and Dr. Story Musgrave. As a mission specialist, Don performed the first EVA, (spacewalk) along with Story Musgrave. He resigned from NASA in 1984 and began his own consulting firm for work involving manned aerospace operations.
He had a remarkable career, but Don would tell you his greatest joy was caring for and spending time with his wife and family. His favorite title was “Dad or Daggy”. He was an active supporter in all three of his children’s academic endeavors, sports teams, and other extracurricular activities. He encouraged them to set goals, put in the work to reach them, then set higher goals and keep at it. The sky was not the limit. He was proud of each of their accomplishments and never hesitated to tell them. Saying “I love you” came easy and often from him. This love continued through the next generation. He told his grandchildren, “holding them in his rocking chair was better than floating in space.” His unconditional love for all of them will be treasured always.
In his last years he liked spending time in his backyard on his swing sipping coffee or sweet tea and admiring his azaleas. He will be remembered as an honest, giving, caring, gentle man. Don died peacefully at home surrounded by his children. His family is comforted knowing his childhood dream of flying has been fulfilled in this life and hereafter.
Don is preceded in death by his parents; Henry W. and Mabel Peterson and his loving wife Bonnie Love Peterson.
He is survived by Brother; Gil Peterson, Children Don Jr. (JoAnn) Peterson, Jean (Bob) Stone, and Shari Peterson, Grandchildren; Shannon (Joe) Hathaway, Katie (Jordan) Senor, Max Stone and Jeff Stone, Great Grandchildren; Molly Kate and Macy Senor, and Laney and Ella Hathaway, Brother in law; Bill Jung, Nephews; Butch, Mike, and Sam Jung, and many other nieces, nephews and family members whom he loved dearly.
The family would like to extend their gratitude to his team of caregivers that enabled him to live out his life at home. Special thanks to Wanda, Brittney, and Candice and the Heart to Heart Hospice Care.
A Memorial Service will be held at Crowder Funeral Home, located at 111 E. Medical Center Blvd. Webster, TX. 77598 on Thursday, May 31, 2018 at 11:00 A.M. with a reception immediately following.
In lieu of flowers, Don’s request is that you make a donation in his name to the charity of your choice. Don always believed “the more you gave, the more you had.”

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Odp: Donald Herod Peterson, Sr. (1933-2018)
« Odpowiedź #13 dnia: Czerwiec 01, 2018, 23:29 »
Pioneering NASA Astronaut Don Peterson Dies at 84
By Robert Z. Pearlman, SPACE.com on May 30, 2018

(...) “Basically I did the same kind of things as a consultant I had done as an astronaut. I worked for several different companies and I worked on things like crew interface and crew procedures and habitability, that is, all the things you put on a spacecraft so people can live there and be reasonably comfortable,” said Peterson.

Peterson continued that work full time through 1993, and then part time, eventually retiring less then occasional public appearance by the early 2000s.

Peterson is survived by a son, Don, two daughters, Jean and Shari, and a brother, Gil. His wife of 60 years, Bonnie Ruth Love, preceded him in death in 2017.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/pioneering-nasa-astronaut-don-peterson-dies-at-84/
« Ostatnia zmiana: Czerwiec 02, 2018, 15:49 wysłana przez Orionid »

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Odp: Donald Herod Peterson, Sr. (1933-2018)
« Odpowiedź #13 dnia: Czerwiec 01, 2018, 23:29 »