Autor Wątek: David Saint-Jacques 06.01.1970  (Przeczytany 807 razy)

0 użytkowników i 1 Gość przegląda ten wątek.

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10366
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: David Saint-Jacques 06.01.1970
« Odpowiedź #15 dnia: Lipiec 03, 2019, 17:23 »
To pewnie z powodu większego dyskomfortu zdrowotnego astronauty wynikała jego obniżona aktywność wizerunkowa po opuszczeniu kapsuły.

Astronaut David Saint-Jacques doing well after space flight, Canadian Space Agency says
By Morgan LowrieThe Canadian Press Mon., June 24, 2019

MONTREAL—Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques is doing well as he continues his long journey home after a six-month stint aboard the International Space Station, the Canadian Space Agency said Tuesday.

The 49-year-old Quebec native boarded a NASA plane after landing in Kazakhstan late Monday and was expected to arrive in Houston Tuesday after a brief stopover in Scotland.

The agency said Saint-Jacques is in good health despite suffering the effects of a 400-kilometre drop to Earth.

“Despite experiencing typical post-flight symptoms like nausea, he is well,” agency spokeswoman Marie-Andre Malouin wrote in an email.

The married father of three was able to speak with his wife and parents after landing, Malouin added.

Former astronaut Robert Thirsk, who co-hosted a viewing party at the Canadian Space Agency headquarters in Longueuil, Que., Monday night, said descending from space in the capsule is a shock to the body comparable to a car crash.
https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2019/06/24/canadian-david-saint-jacques-on-his-way-back-to-earth-after-space-mission.html

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10366
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: David Saint-Jacques 06.01.1970
« Odpowiedź #16 dnia: Lipiec 03, 2019, 17:34 »
David Saint-Jacques Holds His First Post-Landing News Conference
Marc Boucher  June 29, 2019

Adjusting to Earth’s gravity affects every astronaut differently, for David Saint-Jacques getting his equilibrium back to normal has been one of the issues.

That was one of the comments Saint-Jacques made during his first news conference after landing late last Monday night.

While he was clearly feeling the negative effects of transitioning from the microgravity of being on the International Space Station when he first returned to Earth, he looked much better today.

During the news conference he was accompanied by the Canadian Space Agency’s Natalie Hirsch, exercise and nutrition specialist, and Raffi Kuyumjian, the flight surgeon.

“In descending, the force of gravity is strong. It’s like having four people sitting on your chest,” he told the audience, which included members of Saint-Jacques’ family. “It’s hard to breathe, but you have to concentrate to make sure you breathe well and don’t get hurt.”

He added that when the parachute opens before landing, “there is a big movement like a pendulum, left to right, and the landing is a crash like a car accident.”

Thirsk, who spent 188 days on the space station in 2009, said despite the jarring impact, injuries are rare because the seats in the capsule are designed to keep the astronauts protected.

Saint-Jacques, along with NASA astronaut Anne McClain and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko, returned to Earth aboard a Soyuz capsule. He gave a thumbs-up as he was carried from the capsule following what NASA described as a “picture perfect” landing at 10:47 p.m. ET.

During a mission that began Dec. 3, Saint-Jacques took part in a six-and-a-half hour spacewalk and set a record for the longest single space flight by a Canadian at 204 days. He also became the first Canadian astronaut to use the Canadarm2 robotic arm to perform a so-called “cosmic catch” to snag a SpaceX cargo capsule.

The engineer, astrophysicist and family doctor also oversaw science experiments and had numerous discussions with children across the country during his mission.

His next few weeks will be spent recovering from the physical challenges of the flight and readapting to life on Earth after months in zero gravity.

Saint-Jacques is expected to spend weeks or months recovering from the after-effects of the flight, which could include blood circulation problems, muscle pains and an elongated spine that will eventually return to normal.

Raffi Kuyumjian, a doctor with the Canadian Space Agency, has said spending six months in space is “a little like having spent six months in bed without moving.”

In a recent interview, he told The Canadian Press that Saint-Jacques is likely to struggle with balance and co-ordination, as well as a loss of bone density.

Kuyumjian said Saint-Jacques will work with specialists in the gym to help him regain his muscle tone, cardio fitness, and endurance. He will also undergo a separate series of tests for research purposes, to measure how the human body reacts to space flight.

Beyond the muscle and balance issues, it’s likely Saint-Jacques could suffer from a type of reverse motion sickness Kuyumjian dubs “Earth sickness.”

“So the symptoms of nausea that generally come when astronauts arrive in space, there is the equivalent when they return to Earth,” he said.

https://www.spaceq.ca/david-saint-jacques-holds-his-first-post-landing-news-conference/
« Ostatnia zmiana: Lipiec 03, 2019, 17:51 wysłana przez Orionid »

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10366
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: David Saint-Jacques 06.01.1970
« Odpowiedź #17 dnia: Lipiec 03, 2019, 17:38 »
David Saint-Jacques @Astro_DavidS 13 godzin temu

I have been the subject of many medical experiments - here’s a fun memento received from a neuroscientist, a 3D model of my brain!
https://twitter.com/Astro_DavidS/status/1146248082683809793

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10366
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: David Saint-Jacques 06.01.1970
« Odpowiedź #18 dnia: Lipiec 03, 2019, 18:07 »
Wywiad z lekarzem zajmującym się astronautą  o skutkach długotrwałego przebywania na ISS

David Saint-Jacques faces long recovery after return to Earth, doctor says
Jun 23, 2019 11:00 AM by: Canadian Press Updated Jun 23, 2019 11:05 AM



MONTREAL — Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques will return to Earth on Monday following a six-month mission aboard the International Space Station.

The Canadian Press: How will Saint-Jacques feel when he returns to Earth?

Raffi Kuyumjian: Spending about six months (in space), it's a little like having spent six months in bed without moving. His body will have to readapt to gravity. He will need help getting out of the capsule. Clearly, we have to expect some difficulty with the process, a certain lack of balance. He may feel dizzy because his cardiovascular system is no longer used to fighting gravity. And typically (astronauts) have pains everywhere. From the sitting position he will feel pain in the back and the posture muscles because those muscles haven't worked for six months.

CP: How will his body have been changed?

RK: The loss of muscle is hard to quantify, it's very variable. Bone loss, we're talking about an average of one per cent bone density per month that's lost, but it can vary. It depends on several factors, including how much exercise they did, their genetics, physical shape before leaving, etc. Even if the lost bone density is mild or non-existent or recoverable after a certain time, it's quite possible that the bone architecture is not recoverable at all. Bone architecture is simply the shape inside bones. It may be lost forever. Does it have any practical or clinical impact? We don't know yet.

CP: What will happen after he returns to Earth?

RK: In the first few weeks there will be a series of medical exams to make sure he's healthy, but beyond those medical tests there are others that are linked to research. Researchers who study different physiological parameters drew blood and did certain tests before the flight, during the flight, and they will want to see the results after the flight. The third element in the weeks to come is strictly rehabilitation. An exercise specialist will bring him to the gym about two hours per day to make him do different musculature exercises, cardiovascular exercises, so he regains his endurance, his muscular co-ordination, his body's flexibility, endurance in general, all those things that were a little lost.

CP: How long does it take for an astronaut to more or less return to normal?

RK: Normally it takes about a day for every day (in space). So after a few months we should be able to say David has really regained the same level of physical health he had before the flight. The exception is bone density loss, which depending on how much he lost, can take up to a year.

CP: So a space journey is very hard on the human body.

RK: Absolutely. In fact, the time spent during weightlessness in space is often compared to accelerated aging. David adjusted to weightlessness, it took him several weeks to adapt when he was on the space station, and after a time he felt perfectly adapted to space. Now when he comes back, it will be about the same amount of time and rehabilitation that will be necessary to adapt to earth and gravity. Apart from balance problems and lack of strength and co-ordination, we expect there will be symptoms of "Earth sickness," if you will. So the symptoms of nausea that generally come when astronauts arrive in space, there is the equivalent when they return to Earth.

CP: What are the practical applications here on Earth for what we learn about the human body in space?

RK: These physiological changes, which are enormously comparable to the physiological changes that happen when we age, can help researchers find solutions that apply to astronauts but could also apply to an aging population. David has demonstrated two technologies on himself: the biomonitor, a shirt that measures different vital signs and sends the data to Earth; and a portable device for blood tests, so that one day instead of needing a lab to analyze blood counts we can imagine we'll be able to go to the doctor for a blood test and get the results instantly.

CP: What pushes Saint-Jacques to essentially serve as a guinea pig in this way?

RK: All astronauts have one thing in common: they're explorers who question and who want to know more — not only about the human body but where we come from, how we can go further, what is behind the next mountain or beyond the moon. Most astronauts have always dreamed of going to space and exploring, to understand more. That's what they have in common, so it's a bit natural for them to have that thirst for learning and to serve as guinea pigs for research.

-------------
This interview has been edited for length and clarity.
Jean-Benoit Legault, The Canadian Press
https://www.moosejawtoday.com/national-news/david-saint-jacques-faces-long-recovery-after-return-to-earth-doctor-says-1520508

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10366
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: David Saint-Jacques 06.01.1970
« Odpowiedź #19 dnia: Lipiec 03, 2019, 19:14 »
Kosmiczna premiera e-booka skierowanego do najmłodszych, a wydanego przez CSA

2018-12-21 - The Canadian Space Agency releases an e-book, inviting children on the spaciest adventure of their lives! During the event, David read the book for the first time, directly from space. (Credit: Canadian Space Agency)

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-y-_v1S93E" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-y-_v1S93E</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-y-_v1S93E

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10366
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: David Saint-Jacques 06.01.1970
« Odpowiedź #20 dnia: Lipiec 03, 2019, 19:35 »
Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques preparing for mission
The Canadian Press Melanie Marquis August 16, 2018  Last Updated August 17, 2018

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RWy3rcVsBj4" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RWy3rcVsBj4</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RWy3rcVsBj4

MOSCOW — For Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques, it’s all about preparation as he continues his training four months before he blasts off into space.

Saint-Jacques, 48, is currently in Moscow along with U.S. astronaut Anne McClain and Russian Oleg Kononenko, who will join him on board a Soyuz aircraft when it launches for the International Space Station from Kazakhstan on Dec. 20.

“The goal is to get to the day of the launch with a clear mind and the confidence you have full possession of your faculties,” he said in an in-person interview with The Canadian Press on Thursday.

“I like the mountain analogy. Right now, I’m climbing Everest. If you ask a climber who is two-thirds up Everest if he is excited about soon getting to the top… no. He is concentrated. He doesn’t want to trip up, doesn’t want to get caught in his rope.”

The Quebec native, who will become the ninth Canadian to travel to space, will serve as a co-pilot for the Soyuz capsule and, because of his medical training, will be the crew’s doctor on board the station during the six-month stay.

Saint-Jacques is expecting stiff challenges during gruelling training tests Friday.

“At the beginning, you don’t know what to do…but finally you get better and at the end you survive almost everything they throw at you, and you’re ready,” he said.

An astronaut since 2009, Saint-Jacques was named to the mission in 2016.

Trained as both an engineer and a doctor, Saint-Jacques will be the first Canadian aboard the space station since Chris Hadfield spent five months on it in 2012 and 2013.

McClain, who also will be flying into space for the first time, said she is happy to be doing so with her Canadian teammate.

“I knew David before I was assigned to this flight and I was very happy when I got the assignment with him,” she told The Canadian Press in a separate interview. “And I’ve gotten to know him even better over the past few years. And I think the most important aspect of a crew is trust — and I have come to trust David both professionally and personally.

“All of our lives are in each other’s hands in the Soyuz and I trust him to do the right thing. And personally, I can rely on him for anything that comes up in my own life.”

Doug Wheelock, the NASA director of operations at the Moscow space facility, also had kind words for Saint-Jacques.

“He’s a smile with legs, so David is just a joy to have on our team here,” he said.

“He’s got an effervescent personality that tends to draw everyone in…David has been just a real jewel for us.”

Wheelock said being in space is “like a ballet on fingertips.”

“David is very well-tuned, he’s got the hands of a surgeon, so he’s got a very light, very commanding touch on the control systems and he’ll be a great space flyer,” he added.

Saint-Jacques will celebrate his 49th birthday on the space station Jan. 6.
https://nationalpost.com/pmn/news-pmn/canada-news-pmn/canadian-astronaut-david-saint-jacques-preparing-for-mission

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10366
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: David Saint-Jacques 06.01.1970
« Odpowiedź #21 dnia: Lipiec 04, 2019, 11:41 »
CanadianSpaceAgency @csa_asc 25 cze 2019

After resting on the flight from Karaganda to Prestwick, @Astro_DavidS completed the ROBoT experiment, which looks at the challenges of operating a robotic arm in the immediate post-flight period. This update is provided by @docraffi CSA Flight Surgeon. #DareToExplore
https://twitter.com/csa_asc/status/1143624976974712837

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10366
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: David Saint-Jacques 06.01.1970
« Odpowiedź #22 dnia: Lipiec 04, 2019, 11:43 »
CanadianSpaceAgency @csa_asc 2 lip 2019

.@Astro_DavidS is continuing his reconditioning. Yesterday, he did isokinetic testing to assess muscle function and participated to the #CanadaDay celebrations on Parliament Hill. #DareToExplore

Update provided by Natalie Hirsch, CSA.

📷: CSA/Sgt Johanie Maheu, Rideau Hall
https://twitter.com/csa_asc/status/1146171874935812098

Canada Day 2019 on Parliament Hill, in photos
Jul 1, 2019 4:38 PM by: Kieran Delamont

(...) The astronaut they were referring to was not Governor General Julie Payette, but rather David Saint-Jacques, who spoke to the crowd via video link, with a picture of Canada's place on the globe — as seen from orbit, of course — in the background.

“It’s a special day today, I wish I was home,” said Saint-Jaqcues, who returned to earth on June 24 after 205 days in space, and is still recovering from the journey. “I had a chance to see our beautiful country go by, coast to coast to coast." (...)
https://www.ottawamatters.com/local-news/canada-day-2019-on-parliament-hill-in-photos-1549639

https://globalnews.ca/news/5449326/canada-day-ottawa-2019/

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10366
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: David Saint-Jacques 06.01.1970
« Odpowiedź #23 dnia: Lipiec 06, 2019, 21:39 »
David Saint-Jacques bierze udział w pomiarze struktury kości

CanadianSpaceAgency @csa_asc 5 lip 2019

Today, the TBone team used the latest 3D imaging technology to measure @Astro_DavidS’s bone structure to understand how it changes in space and how it adapts back to Earth’s gravity. To learn more: http://www.asc-csa.gc.ca/eng/sciences/tbone.asp …. #DareToExplore
Photo: CSA
https://twitter.com/csa_asc/status/1147249394544271361

więcej w wątku: http://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=1393.msg133896#msg133896

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10366
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: David Saint-Jacques 06.01.1970
« Odpowiedź #24 dnia: Październik 20, 2019, 20:47 »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZBS1Mu4qTQg" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZBS1Mu4qTQg</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZBS1Mu4qTQg