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« Odpowiedź #30 dnia: Kwiecień 01, 2020, 02:49 »
Reimar Lüst



Prof. Dr Reimar Lüst was the third Director General of ESA, serving from 1984 until 1990.

Prof. Lüst was born on 25 March 1923 in Wuppertal-Barmen, Germany. He began his studies in 1933 at the Humanistisches Gymnasium in Kassel, until these were interrupted by military service with the German navy in 1941. He served on submarines (Lt. Ing.) and became a prisoner-of-war in England and USA between 1943-46.

He resumed his studies in 1946 and was awarded a Diploma in Physics from the University of Frankfurt/Main in 1949, and a Doctorate in 1951 from the University of Göttingen.

In 1951, Lüst became Fellow and assistant at the Max Planck Institute for Physics, Göttingen, and was a Fulbright Fellow at the Enrico Fermi Institute of the University of Chicago and at Princeton University in 1955-56.

Then followed many distinguished academic positions, at the University of Munich, the University of New York, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.

Prof. Lüst was involved with European space science administration from the very first days of the ‘Commission préparatoire européenne de recherches spatiales’ (COPERS). First as Secretary of the Scientific and Technical Working Group, then as Scientific Director of the European Space Research Organisation (ESRO) from 1962 to 1964, he helped to draw up the scientific programme for ESRO.

After a break at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching, and the University of Munich, he became Vice President of ESRO in 1968-70. He was appointed Chairman of the German Science Council (Wissenschaftsrat) 1969-72.

Before joining ESA in 1984, Prof. Lüst was President of the Max Planck Society. Since leaving ESA, he has held a number of senior positions: President (then Honorary President) of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Bonn, Professor at the University of Hamburg, then Chairman and Honorary Chairman (2005) of the Board of Governors, International University, Bremen.

Prof. Lüst's research career has made contributions to our knowledge of the origins of our planetary system, solar physics, the physics of cosmic rays, plasma physics, hydrodynamics and to the physics of nuclear fusion. He was also closely involved the first ESRO sounding rocket launches and satellites to study the upper atmosphere and the planetary medium. He directed experiments on the ESRO-IV and HEOS-A satellites, and was an experiment group leader for the COS-B satellite.

The planetoid 4836 was named 'Lüst', an in 1995 Prof. Lüst received the Adenauer-de Gaulle Prize and the Weizman Award for Science and Humanities. He was also awarded the title of Officer of the French Légion d’Honneur and holds the Grand Federal Cross of Merit of the German Republic.


https://www.esa.int/About_Us/Corporate_news/Reimar_Luest

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« Odpowiedź #31 dnia: Kwiecień 01, 2020, 02:50 »
Reimar Lüst 1972-1984

Reimar Lüst - From U-Boat engineer to University founder
A portrat by Michael Globig

People don't generally say that they have two dates of birth; however, physicist and science manager Professor Reimar Lüst is one who does. The first date of birth is his real one: 90 years ago, on 25 March 1923, is when he was born in Barmen (now a part of Wuppertal). He mentions his other birthday in the book Der Wissenschaftsmacher, a collection of conversations recorded between historian Paul Nolte and Lüst two years ago: that date is 11 May 1943. That's the day when Lüst, then an engineering officer, was the last man out of a submarine.

The U-boat had been severely damaged by depth charges and artillery fire, and was going to be sunk to prevent it from getting into the hands of the enemy. Lüst swam over to the English frigate that had attacked the sub and was heaved onto the deck – one of 45 crewmembers to be rescued (eleven died). That's why he sees this date as his second birthday.

But the day was to have a significance of another kind for Lüst, a mechanical engineer by background: He was taken into British captivity and later handed over to the Americans. They in turn put him in a prisoner-of-war camp where the inmates – all officers – had set up their own university. Here, the prisoners had the opportunity to listen to lectures given by their fellow prisoners, many of whom had highly specialised backgrounds. It was even possible to sit exams and have them marked. Lüst seized the opportunity and spent four semesters studying theoretical physics and mathematics. He was released from war imprisonment on 25 May 1946, his 23rd birthday. He then took up the studies he had begun in the camp at the University of Frankfurt. The university recognised two of the semesters he had completed in the camp, which enabled him to sit his degree examination as early as the beginning of 1949.

He obtained his PhD in Göttingen in May 1951 under Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker, who had given him a problem from theoretical astrophysics for his dissertation topic. With his doctorate under his belt, he took up a post at the Max Planck Institute of Physics, which he interrupted in 1955/56 upon receipt of a one-year Fulbright Scholarship for the US and in 1959 when he was given a guest professorship in mathematics in New York. In 1960 he eventually obtained his postdoctoral lecturing qualification for physics at the Universität München. Lüst became a Scientific Member at the Max Planck Institute of Physics and Astrophysics, which had since moved from Göttingen to Munich, and had added a separate department for extraterrestrial physics in 1963, of which he became Director.

An artificial comet's tail

Naturally, there was a back-story to this: Ludwig Biermann, a colleague of Lüst's from his Göttingen days, had discovered in the early 1950s that comets have a tail consisting of ionised particles which are affected and thrown off track by solar corpuscular radiation (the solar wind). He and Lüst discussed how an artificial comet's tail could be created to test the theory. A mixture of barium and copper oxide proved to be particularly suitable as the starting product for the artificial tail: when a chemical reaction was caused between them, the mixture evaporated and left a cloud of ionised barium atoms.

From the early 1960s onwards, barium containers, which had been developed at the institute, were shot up to great heights with the help of French rockets to produce artificial comet tails. These made the solar wind visible and in the Institute's later experiments also interacted with the Earth's magnetic field. From Earth, they were visible as elongated coloured clouds which aligned themselves with the lines of the Earth's magnetic field. These were the successful beginnings of German space research. And they are what led to Lüst acquiring the department mentioned above – his 'little institute', as it was known – which later became the MPI for Extraterrestrial Physics.

So much for Lüst the scientist. Much more multi-faceted is the life of Lüst the science manager. It began in 1961, when a planning committee was convened for the establishment of a European Space Research Organisation (ESRO), which Lüst charged with handling the entire coordination of the scientific programme in Paris. Lüst's policy consisted in giving the ESRO a remit to provide the technical resources only (rockets, satellites, payloads). The experiments done in the satellites, on the other hand, were to be built and supervised by the national institutes. Lüst eventually parted ways with the ESRO in 1964 to put all his efforts into building up his own institute. But he was called back into the world of science policy in 1969: The German Science Council, which at the time dealt mostly with the expansion of universities and the establishment of new ones, elected him chairman – a post he held until 1972.

"The no. 1 of the Scholar Republic"

That year a new challenge came his way: Adolf Butenandt's period of office as President of the Max Planck Society (MPG) was coming to an end after twelve years and a new President had to be elected. In search of a suitable successor, the Senate of the MPG had come across Reimar Lüst in late 1971: he had long since made a name for himself as a coordinator who could balance different interests and as a good organiser. After intensive talks with Werner Heisenberg, Lüst was prepared to put himself up for office. The Senate elected him the new President on 19 November 1971. His term in office, which was to last twelve years, began on 20 June 1972 at the General Meeting of the Max Planck Society in Bremen. He was now, as a newspaper dubbed him, "the no. 1 of the Scholar Republic".

The Max Planck Society was up in arms at the time. A structural committee which had been convened to amend the statutes took the view that the staff of the institutes should not only be in the Senate but that every institute should also be represented by a member in the respective Section – Chemistry, Physics & Technology, Biology & Medicine, and Human Sciences. The biologists rejected the proposal vehemently, the human scientists were a bit more open to the suggestion and the physicists thought it was a good idea. By way of compromise, Lüst recommended giving the staff a say in the Sections, but not the right to vote on appointment matters.

Under Lüst's presidency, the Senate Planning Committee was established – with a mandate to decide on the closure of institutes and the opening of new ones. Among the new institutes that came into being at that time are the Max Planck Institute of Mathematics in Bonn and the MPI for Psycholinguistics in the Dutch town of Nijmegen. One of the institutes that was closed is the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Living Conditions in the Scientific and Technical World, which had been founded in Starnberg at the end of the 1960s at the instigation of Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker and for which no suitable successor could be found after von Weizsäcker's retirement in the early 1980s. It was particularly painful for Lüst to have to inform his former PhD supervisor of the decision to close the Institute.

"A little sad to have to leave this wonderful office"

Lüst's second term of office as President of the Max Planck Society ended in 1984. At the time he was "a little sad to have to leave this wonderful office". However, a new challenge was just around the corner: he became Director General of ESA (the European Space Agency) in Paris, a post he held for six years and one of the many he was given without ever having applied for the job. It was a time when European space travel was in the ascendant: the Ariane III rocket was successfully launched, putting the Spacelab into orbit and carrying Ulf Merbold as the first astronaut to work in it. And in 1985 the European space probe, Giotto – though planned long before the start of Lüst's time in office – managed to get as close as 600 kilometres to Halley's Comet and take photos of the comet's nucleus. Another of the events that took place while Lüst was in office was the Conference of Ministers in The Hague, where the decision was made that Europe should make its own contribution for inclusion in the International Space Station.

By the time Lüst stopped working for the ESA in 1990, he had long since found something else to keep him busy. He had been appointed President of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in 1989, one of Germany's most important institutions for the advancement of excellent postdoctoral researchers from abroad up to the age of 40. He held this post for ten years. And after that, it should come as no surprise to hear that a new challenge was already awaiting him: the task of establishing a private university, the International University Bremen (IUB, now Jacobs University). Lüst, who had campaigned for German university reform back when he had been Chairman of the German Science Council, was asked by representatives of the Hanseatic City whether he would be prepared to work with them on the planning of the IUB. He consented, but only on several conditions: the Senate and the townspeople had to be fully behind the project, the IUB had to be a fully-fledged university offering courses of study in the natural sciences, humanities and social sciences, and it had to have a board that elected the university president. Other conditions were that it hold entrance exams and lectures in English and charge tuition fees. When he received confirmation that these conditions would be met, he agreed to take part in the planning.

The IUB was officially founded in February 1999. The office of president was assumed by Fritz Schaumann, formerly undersecretary in the Ministry of Education and Research; Lüst was elected Chairman of the Board of Governors, and remains Honorary Chairman to this day. On the advice of Lüst, the IUB was given two faculties: the School of Engineering and Science and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences. September 2001 marked the official inauguration of the IUB, and a third faculty, the Jacobs Center for Lifelong Learning, was added in October 2003.

It's hard to believe that this would be the last challenge Lüst sets himself. The Max Planck Society, in any case, is preparing for further surprises.


https://www.mpg.de/8241473/reimar-luest

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« Odpowiedź #32 dnia: Kwiecień 01, 2020, 03:09 »
Jacobs University's first honorary doctor: Reimar Lüst
7 mar 2013

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nzao8rVB8R8" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nzao8rVB8R8</a>

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« Odpowiedź #33 dnia: Kwiecień 04, 2020, 07:40 »
NASA Station Astronaut Record Holders
April 17, 2020 Editor: Mark Garcia


NASA astronaut Scott Kelly completed a single mission aboard the International Space Station of 340 days on March 1, 2016. NASA astronaut Christina Koch's first mission aboard the orbiting lab ended after 328 days on Feb. 6, 2020.


Peggy Whitson set the record on Sept. 2, 2017, for most cumulative days living and working in space by a NASA astronaut at 665 days.
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/nasa-station-astronaut-record-holders

https://twitter.com/SpacesFuture/status/1238231401410904064
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Polskie Forum Astronautyczne

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« Odpowiedź #33 dnia: Kwiecień 04, 2020, 07:40 »

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« Odpowiedź #34 dnia: Czerwiec 09, 2020, 15:35 »
Była astronautka NASA Kathy Sullivan, 68 stała się pierwszą kobietą, która 6.6.2020 zanurzyła się batyskafem w Rowie Mariańskim (głębia 11 km)...

więcej: 1) http://www.collectspace.com/news/news-060820a-astronaut-sullivan-challenger-deep.html

2) https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/08/science/challenger-deep-kathy-sullivan-astronaut.html?smtyp=cur&smid=tw-nytimes

Na fotce wraz z dowódcą statku Victor L. Vescovo, 53.
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« Odpowiedź #35 dnia: Czerwiec 09, 2020, 16:35 »
2) https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/08/science/challenger-deep-kathy-sullivan-astronaut.html?smtyp=cur&smid=tw-nytimes
Uciekający artykuł więc lepiej przytoczyć go w całości.
Ciekawe czy astronautka powtórzy swój wyczyn ?

First American Woman to Walk in Space Reaches Deepest Spot in the Ocean
By Heather Murphy June 8, 2020

The astronaut Kathy Sullivan, 68, is now also the first woman to reach the Challenger Deep, about seven miles below the ocean’s surface.


Kathy Sullivan and Victor Vescovo after their 35,810-foot dive to the Challenger Deep.Credit...Enrique Alvarez

The first American woman to walk in space has become the first woman to reach the deepest known spot in the ocean.

On Sunday, Kathy Sullivan, 68, an astronaut and oceanographer, emerged from her 35,810-foot dive to the Challenger Deep, according to EYOS Expeditions, a company coordinating the logistics of the mission.

This also makes Dr. Sullivan the first person to both walk in space and to descend to the deepest point in the ocean. The Challenger Deep is the lowest of the many seabed recesses that crisscross the globe.

Dr. Sullivan and Victor L. Vescovo, an explorer funding the mission, spent about an hour and a half at their destination, nearly seven miles down in a muddy depression in the Mariana Trench, which is about 200 miles southwest of Guam.

After capturing images from the Limiting Factor, a specially designed deep-sea research submersible, they began the roughly four-hour ascent.

Upon returning to their ship, the pair called a group of astronauts aboard the International Space Station, around 254 miles above earth.

“As a hybrid oceanographer and astronaut this was an extraordinary day, a once in a lifetime day, seeing the moonscape of the Challenger Deep and then comparing notes with my colleagues on the ISS about our remarkable reusable inner-space outer-spacecraft,” Dr. Sullivan said in a statement released by EYOS Expeditions on Monday.

Early Sunday, Mr. Vescovo applauded Dr. Sullivan for being “the first woman to the bottom of the ocean.”

“Big congratulations to her!” Mr. Vescovo posted on Twitter.

In 1978, Dr. Sullivan joined NASA as part of the first group of U.S. astronauts to include women. On Oct. 11, 1984, she became the first American woman to walk in space.


Dr. Sullivan during a space walk from the shuttle Challenger in 1984.Credit...NASA

“That is really great,” Dr. Sullivan said after she floated into the cargo bay of the shuttle Challenger, about 140 miles above Earth.

She later became the administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Dr. Sullivan had a longstanding fascination with the ocean — before becoming an astronaut, she participated in one of the first attempts to use a submersible to study the volcanic processes that make the ocean crust, according to Collect Space, a space history site.

Tim Shank, a biologist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, called Dr. Sullivan a “consummate leader” in the study of the world’s oceans. There is currently only one submarine in the world that can reach the Challenger Deep, he said.

“I’m thrilled to hear that she was in it,” he said. “Anytime we can reach such extreme places on Earth to learn about them, it’s a major event.”

The Challenger Deep was discovered by the H.M.S. Challenger, a British ship that sailed the globe from 1872 to 1876. Since then, many expeditions have sought to measure the fissure’s depth, prompting disagreements not only about the precise figures but also over who truly was the first to reach the deepest point.

In April 2019, Mr. Vescovo, Dr. Sullivan’s diving partner, said he was; the “Titanic” director James Cameron disagreed, insisting he had gone deeper in 2012.

Dr. Sullivan will remain at sea for the next few days, according to a representative from Caladan Oceanic, another company involved in the mission.
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/08/science/challenger-deep-kathy-sullivan-astronaut.html?smtyp=cur&smid=tw-nytimes

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« Odpowiedź #36 dnia: Czerwiec 09, 2020, 16:36 »
NASA astronaut from historic spacewalk becomes first woman to reach deepest point in ocean
N'dea Yancey-Bragg USA TODAY Published 9:21 AM EDT Jun 9, 2020

Former NASA astronaut Kathryn D. Sullivan, the first American woman to walk in space, is now also the first woman to reach the deepest point in the ocean.

Sullivan, an oceanographer and veteran of three space shuttle flights, is the first person to achieve both feats. After returning from a nearly 7 mile dive to Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench, Sullivan called her colleagues at the International Space Station, which is in orbit 254 miles above Earth.

“As a hybrid oceanographer and astronaut this was an extraordinary day, a once in a lifetime day, seeing the moonscape of the Challenger Deep and then comparing notes with my colleagues on the ISS about our remarkable reusable inner-space outer-spacecraft," Sullivan said in a statement released Monday by EYOS Expeditions, the company coordinating the mission.

Sullivan became the first American woman to walk in space in a 1984 mission on the space shuttle Challenger and later left NASA to become administrator at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, according to NASA.

She traveled to the deepest point in the ocean, located in the Western Pacific Ocean, on a submersible called the Limiting Factor piloted by Victor Vescovo of Caladan Oceanic before returning to its mothership the Pressure Drop. Vescovo, who has also piloted the Limiting Factor on a recent dive to the Titanic, became the fourth person to reach Challenger Deep last year.

Historic dive: The first manned dive to the Titanic in 14 years found a wreck in 'shocking' decay. The photos are spooky

Eight people have reached the bottom of Challenger Deep, including Vescovo, Sullivan and film maker James Cameron who reached the bottom in 2012, according to EYOS Expeditions.

Vescovo congratulated Sullivan on being "the first woman to the bottom of the ocean" on Twitter.

“We made some more history today," he said in a statement. "And then got to share the experience with kindred spirits in the ISS. It was a pleasure to have Kathy along both as an oceanographer during the dive, and then as an astronaut to talk to the ISS.”

https://eu.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2020/06/09/former-nasa-astronaut-kathryn-sullivan-reaches-deepest-spot-ocean/5325153002/

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« Odpowiedź #37 dnia: Czerwiec 09, 2020, 16:38 »
Former astronaut becomes first person to have been in space and at full ocean depth
Dr Kathryn Sullivan became the first American woman to walk in space in 1983


Dr Kathryn Sullivan became the first human to have been in space and at full ocean depth ( National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) )

(...) Expedition leader Rob McCallum said, “It was amazing to set up a conversation between two ’spacecraft’; one operating as a platform for research in outer space, the other an exploration vehicle for ‘inner space’. Two groups of humans using cutting edge technology to explore the outer edges of our world. It highlighted the vast span of human endeavour while at the same time linking us close together as fellow explorers. We are well used to our clients being ambitious in their quest to explore… but this was a new ‘first’.”

Pilot Mr Vescovo was previously the fourth person in history to reach Challenger Deep as part of his Five Deeps expedition; over the course of seven days, his team made five dives in the Mariana Trench. (...)
https://www.independent.co.uk/news/long_reads/science-and-technology/kathryn-sullivan-astronaut-nasa-challenger-deep-first-limiting-factor-a9555351.html

https://www.lexpress.fr/actualite/sciences/l-ex-astronaute-kathryn-sullivan-devient-la-premiere-femme-a-visiter-le-fond-de-l-ocean_2127771.html

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« Odpowiedź #38 dnia: Czerwiec 09, 2020, 16:41 »
Former NASA Astronaut Becomes First Woman to Reach Deepest Point on Earth
 Aristos Georgiou 1 day ago


© Brad Barket/Getty Images Kathryn Sullivan attends 18th Annual Webby Awards on May 19, 2014 in New York, United States.

(...) The first people to achieve the feat were Swiss oceanographer Jacques Piccard and U.S. Navy lieutenant Don Walsh in 1960. The pair were followed by film director James Cameron who made a solo dive in 2012 aboard the submersible Deepsea Challenger.

Then last year Limiting Factor made four trips to Challenger Deep in the space of eight days as part of EYOS and Caladan's Five Deeps Expedition. Vescovo piloted two of these dives, becoming the first person to have reached the summit of Everest, the two poles, and the bottom of four of the world's oceans.

The remaining three people to have reached Challenger Deep include Alan Jamieson, who was Chief Scientist on the Five Deeps Expedition, as well as Patrick Lahey and John Ramsay from Triton Submarines, the company that built Limiting Factor.

The latest descent to Challenger Deep took over four hours, with the total duration of the dive approaching 14 hours. (...)
https://www.msn.com/en-za/news/techandscience/former-nasa-astronaut-becomes-first-woman-to-reach-deepest-point-on-earth/ar-BB15dgT3?li=BBqg6Q6

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« Odpowiedź #39 dnia: Czerwiec 09, 2020, 22:52 »
Kathryn Sullivan jest 7 czy 8 człowiekiem na dnie Rowu Mariańskiego?

Bo coś te wykazy są nie precyzyjne!

1 i 2) Don Walsh i Jacques Piccard (razem) 23 stycznia 1960;
3) James Cameron (sam) 26 marca 2012;
4) Victor Vescovo (sam) 28 kwietnia 2019;
5) Victor Vescovo (2-gi raz) 01 maja 2019;
6) ?
7 i 8) Victor Vescovo (3-ci raz) i Kathy Sullivan (1 kobieta) 06 czerwca 2020;
= = =
Aktualne zestawienie:
1) Jacques Piccard (Jan. 23, 1960)
2) Don Walsh (Jan. 23, 1960)
3) James Cameron (March 26, 2012)
4) Victor Vescovo (April 28, 2019, May 1, 2019, June 6, 2020, June 12, 2020)
5) Patrick Lahey (May 3, 2019, May 5, 2019)
6) Jonathan Struwe (May 3, 2019)
7) John Ramsay (May 5, 2019)
8) Kathy Sullivan (June 6, 2020)
9) Vanessa O'Brien (June 12, 2020)

i nowi w gotowości...
« Ostatnia zmiana: Czerwiec 15, 2020, 21:14 wysłana przez mss »
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« Odpowiedź #40 dnia: Czerwiec 10, 2020, 01:49 »
Kathy Sullivan@AstroKDS 3:24 PM · 9 cze 2020
36 years after my space walk, I became the first woman to dive to the deepest known spot in the ocean - the Challenger Deep.  #WorldOceansDay
https://twitter.com/AstroKDS/status/1270346091209375744

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« Odpowiedź #41 dnia: Czerwiec 10, 2020, 01:50 »
Kathy Sullivan@AstroKDS 8:06 PM · 9 cze 2020
Thanks @heathertal for covering the dive for the @nytimes
 "The first American woman to walk in space has become the first woman to reach the deepest known spot in the ocean." https://nytimes.com/2020/06/08/science/challenger-deep-kathy-sullivan-astronaut.html
https://twitter.com/AstroKDS/status/1270416946861756416

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« Odpowiedź #42 dnia: Czerwiec 10, 2020, 01:55 »
Wywiad sprzed zejścia na głębiny.

The Vanity Fair Future Series: A Conversation with Kathy Sullivan | Vanity Fair London
115 wyświetleń•9 cze 2020

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FrVE6Z2xbQM" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FrVE6Z2xbQM</a>

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« Odpowiedź #43 dnia: Czerwiec 10, 2020, 02:00 »
Royal Astronomical Society@RoyalAstroSoc 12:33 PM · 8 mar 2020

Happy #InternationalWomensDay from the Royal Astronomical Society Iskry Our rising star Assistant Editor
@lucywimss met Astronaut Dr Kathryn Sullivan @AstroKDS at the National Student Space Conference yesterday! #IWD2020 #IWD
https://twitter.com/RoyalAstroSoc/status/1236616139100258304

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« Odpowiedź #44 dnia: Czerwiec 10, 2020, 02:06 »
Wykład astronautki o HST

Kristina@kri0sis 9:56 PM · 31 mar 2020
@AstroKDS speaking at the @UKSEDS #NSSC2020 today On #space walks + @NASAHubble AMAZING. That's all I can say..
https://twitter.com/kri0sis/status/1236305126895357952

Rescuing The Hubble Space Telescope - with Kathryn D. Sullivan
23 837 wyświetleń•26 mar 2020 The Royal Institution

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=foNf4dVwe80" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=foNf4dVwe80</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=foNf4dVwe80

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