Autor Wątek: Alfred Merrill Worden 07.02.1932  (Przeczytany 387 razy)

0 użytkowników i 1 Gość przegląda ten wątek.

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10402
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Alfred Merrill Worden 07.02.1932
« dnia: Sierpień 16, 2019, 07:53 »
Alfred Merrill Worden 07.02.1932

7 sierpnia minęło 48 lat od powrotu Alfreda Wordena z jego jedynej kosmicznej wyprawy, którą odbył w kierunku Księżyca.   

 







http://www.alworden.com/
https://web.archive.org/web/20071030050913/http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/worden-am.html

http://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=39.msg133839#msg133839

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10402
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Alfred Merrill Worden 07.02.1932
« Odpowiedź #1 dnia: Sierpień 16, 2019, 07:54 »
(...) And is in the World Guinness Book of Records as the “Most isolated human being”.

He completed the first deep space EVA – as photographed here.


Photo: Al Worden performing humanity’s first deep-space EVA during Apollo 15’s homeward journey

(...) Al signed and dedicated a moon map of his mission’s landing site to/ for me – this is from the man who flew around the moon by himself for 3 days but never landed!



http://www.alexanderkumar.com/portfolio/interview-apollo-15-nasa-astronaut-al-worden/

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10402
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Alfred Merrill Worden 07.02.1932
« Odpowiedź #2 dnia: Sierpień 16, 2019, 07:55 »
Apollo 15’s Al Worden on Space and Scandal
By Julie Mianecki SMITHSONIAN MAGAZINE  OCTOBER 2011

The astronaut talks about his lunar mission, the scandal that followed and the future of space missions


Apollo 15 astronaut Al Worden discusses his new book and the scandal that surrounded him after he returned to earth in 1971. (Eric Long / NASM, SI)

Shortly after his return to earth in 1971, Apollo 15 astronaut Al Worden found himself mired in scandal—he and his crew had sold souvenir autographed postal covers they had taken aboard their spacecraft. As a result, they were banned from ever flying in space again. Recently, Worden was at Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum to sign his new book, Falling to Earth, about his lunar mission and the ensuing scandal. He spoke with the magazine’s Julie Mianecki.

Apollo 15 was the first mission to use the lunar rover, to conduct extensive scientific experiments in space, and to place a satellite in lunar orbit, among other things. What is your proudest accomplishment?

Interesting question. God it was all so great. It’s hard to pick out any one thing. But I would say doing the orbital science—we did everything. The thing that was most interesting to me was taking photographs of very faint objects with a special camera that I had on board. These objects reflect sunlight, but it’s very, very weak and you can’t see it from [Earth]. There are several places between the Earth and the moon that are stable equilibrium points. And if that’s the case, there has to be a dust cloud there. I got pictures of that. I photographed 25 percent of the moon’s surface, which was really kind of neat. And also took mapping camera pictures of the moon for the cartographers.

You spent approximately 75 hours in the command module alone, isolated from even NASA as you went around the far side of the moon. How did you keep yourself entertained?

I didn’t really have to worry about it too much because I didn’t have a chance to think about it very much. I only slept about four hours a night when I was by myself; and that was because I was really busy. But when I wasn’t busy, I was looking out the window taking it all in. It was hard to go to sleep, because there’s a certain amount of excitement involved in it, and there’s also the thought that we’re only going to come this way once, we’re never going to do it again, so we better do all we can while we’re here. So, I was busy 18 hours a day doing science stuff, and I was kind of looking out the window for another two, three, four hours each day, just taking it all in, which was great. The greatest part of it all, of course, was watching the Earth rise. Every time I came around the moon I went to a window and watched the Earth rise and that was pretty unique.

When you did get a chance, what kind of music did you listen to?

I took a collection of tapes with us on the flight and we had a lot of country western, but I was pretty much into the Beatles back in those days, so I carried a lot of Beatles music, and then I carried some French music, a French singer Mireille Mathieu, I carried some of her music too, and then we also carried the Air Force song and some others. Didn’t play it a whole lot on the flight because we were so busy but it was fun to have it there.

You performed the first deep-space extravehicular activity, or space walk, more than 196,000 miles from Earth. Was it frightening to work outside of the spacecraft?

It wasn’t really because it’s like anything that you learn. You practice it and practice it and practice it to the point where you don’t really think about it very much when you’re doing the real thing. I had a lot of confidence in the equipment and Dave and Jim back in the spacecraft. So it was fairly easy to do. But it was pretty unusual to be outside the spacecraft a couple hundred thousand miles from Earth, too. It’s dark out there. The sun was shining off the spacecraft, and that’s the only light I had, the reflected light. So it was different. You’re sort of floating out there in a vast nothingness, and the only thing you can see and touch and grab a hold of is the spacecraft. But I wasn’t going to go anywhere, I was tethered to the spacecraft, so I knew I wasn’t going to float away. So I just did what I had to do, went hand over hand down the handrails, grabbed the film cartridges, brought them back and went back out again and just stood up and looked around, and that’s when I could see both the Earth and the moon. It was a problem with the training, I had trained so well that it didn’t take me any time to do what I had to do, and everything worked out okay, and when I was all done, I thought, “Gee, I wish I had found something so that I could have been out there a little longer.”

Previous astronauts had taken objects into space that later found their way onto the market. Why was the Apollo 15 crew singled out for disciplinary action?

Those postal covers were sold a couple of months after the flight and quickly became public knowledge. So, I think NASA management felt they had to do something. There had been a similar incident the previous year, when the Apollo 14 crew allegedly made a deal with Franklin Mint to bring silver medallions into space. But NASA kind of smoothed that over because the [astronaut] involved was Alan Shepard, (the first American in space] who was a little more famous than we were. The government never said that we did anything illegal, they just thought it wasn’t in good taste.

After leaving the Air Force, you ran for Congress, flew sightseeing helicopters and developed microprocessors for airplanes. What are you going to do next?

Right now obviously you guys at the Smithsonian have got me busy running around the world, that’s going to take a few months. I’m thinking when this is all over that I might finally, actually retire. I’ve done that a few times and I’ve never been very happy in retirement. So I always go out and find something else to do. I retired the first time in 1975 from the Air Force, and I’ve retired three times since then. I’m just one of those people. I just have to find something to do. So I don’t know, I don’t have anything specific in mind right now, except my wife and I are making plans to build a house on a lake up here in Michigan, get our grandkids here, get a boat and teach them how to water-ski and stuff like that. So that’s kind of our plan right now.

What are your reactions to the end of the space shuttle program?

It’s really sad. The space program is exactly the shot in the arm this country needs—not just from the standpoint of going somewhere, but in developing the technology to go there, and in providing motivation for kids in school.

What advice would you give to young people who wish to pursue a career in space?

The opportunity’s still there. I think there are going to be several avenues for young people to follow. One is in the private sector, because I do believe the private sector will be able to do some things in space. I don’t know about going into Earth orbit. I think that’s a long shot. But there’s a lot of other things that need to be done in space. I think there is just a great need for scientists to look at the universe, not necessarily flying in space, but looking at objects in space, and figuring out what our place is in the universe.

Where do you stand in the debate over manned versus unmanned space exploration?

We can find out a lot about other planets by sending probes and robotic rovers. But, ultimately, you’ll need people on site who can evaluate their surroundings and quickly adapt to what’s going on around them. I see unmanned exploration as a precursor to manned exploration—that’s the combination that’s going to get us where we want to go the quickest.

You grew up on a farm in rural Michigan. What motivated you to become an astronaut?

I won’t say that I was really motivated to be an astronaut when I was young. In fact, I was the only one working the farm from the time I was 12 until I went off to college. And the one thing I decided from all that—especially here in Michigan, which is pretty hardscrabble farming—was that I was going to do anything I could so that I didn’t end up living the rest of my life on a farm. So that kind of motivated me to go to school, and of course I went to West Point, which is a military school, and from there I went into the Air Force and followed a normal career path. Never really thought about the space program until I had graduated from the graduate school at Michigan back in 1964, and I was assigned to a test pilot school in England, and that’s when I first started thinking about being an astronaut. I was following my own professional line, to be the best pilot and best test pilot I could be. And if the space program ended up being something I could be involved in then that would be fine, but otherwise I was very happy doing what I was doing. They did have an application process and I was able to apply and I did get in, but I can’t say it was a driving force in my life.

Astronauts are heroes for many people. Who are your heroes?

My grandfather would be first, because he taught me responsibility and a work ethic. Then there was my high school principal, who got me through school and into college without costing my family any money. Later in life, it was Michael Collins, who was the command module pilot on Apollo 11. Mike was the most professional, nicest, most competent guy that I’ve ever worked with. It was amazing to me that he could have gone from being an astronaut to being appointed the first director of the new Air and Space Museum in 1971.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/apollo-15s-al-worden-on-space-and-scandal-73346679/

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10402
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Alfred Merrill Worden 07.02.1932
« Odpowiedź #3 dnia: Sierpień 16, 2019, 07:56 »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yP05nhB2WLU" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yP05nhB2WLU</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yP05nhB2WLU

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10402
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Alfred Merrill Worden 07.02.1932
« Odpowiedź #4 dnia: Sierpień 16, 2019, 07:58 »
@WordenAlfred 23 wrz 2016

Had a great interview with @bbc5live yesterday. Easy day today @newscilive with @BIS_spaceflight thx to @Victrix75 for keeping me in check!
https://twitter.com/WordenAlfred/status/779238707031343104

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10402
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Alfred Merrill Worden 07.02.1932
« Odpowiedź #5 dnia: Sierpień 16, 2019, 08:00 »
ACM Mike Wigston@ChiefofAirStaff 16 lip 2018

"An extraordinary #RAF100 gift presented by @WordonAlfred - a US flag which flew with him to the Moon on #Apollo 15.  Reinforcing the bond between RAF and USAF and an inspiring example for our next generation of air and space power experts. @FIAFarnborough
https://twitter.com/ChiefofAirStaff/status/1018906677402374144

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10402
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Alfred Merrill Worden 07.02.1932
« Odpowiedź #6 dnia: Sierpień 16, 2019, 08:03 »
@Victrix75  18 lip 2018
At the @kallmanewc #USPavilion with @WordenAlfred for #FallingtoEarth book signing.
https://twitter.com/Victrix75/status/1019582267239354368

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10402
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Alfred Merrill Worden 07.02.1932
« Odpowiedź #7 dnia: Sierpień 16, 2019, 08:05 »
Z KSIĘŻYCA DO TARGÓW KIELCE! – NIEZWYKŁY GOŚĆ NA MSPO 2019
17.05.2019

Gościem Honorowym Wystawy USA będzie płk Alfred Merrill Worden – amerykański astronauta, pułkownik United States Air Force, uczestnik misji Apollo 15. (...)
https://targikielce.pl/pl/aktualnosci,1,z-ksiezyca-do-targow-kielce-niezwykly-gosc-na-mspo-2019,28887.chtm

WYSTAWA NARODOWA USA PODCZAS MSPO 2019 Z WIELOMA ATRAKCJAMI
18.04.2019

Od 3 do 6 września będzie można zobaczyć potencjał obronny Stanów Zjednoczonych Ameryki podczas Międzynarodowego Salonu Przemysłu Obronnego. (...)
https://www.targikielce.pl/pl/aktualnosci,1,wystawa-narodowa-usa-podczas-mspo-2019-z-wieloma-atrakcjami,28529.chtm

Online mss

  • Moderator
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 4796
  • Space is not only about science, it is a vision,
    • Astronauci i ich loty...
Odp: Alfred Merrill Worden 07.02.1932
« Odpowiedź #8 dnia: Wrzesień 04, 2019, 20:26 »
http://www.radio.kielce.pl/pl/post-90712

Cytuj
Uczestnik misji Apollo 15 spotkał się z uczniami z Kielc

Data publikacji: 04.09.2019 15:22
Autor: Wiktor Dziarmaga

Pułkownik Alfred Merrill Worden, amerykański astronauta i uczestnik misji Apollo 15, spotkał się dzisiaj z uczniami Zespół Szkół Katolickich im Stanisława Kostki w Kielcach.

Odpowiadając na pytania uczniów opowiedział między innymi o przygotowaniach do lotu na Księżyc oraz trudach w trakcie misji.

- Tak naprawdę nie da się przyzwyczaić do warunków w kosmosie. Sporym problemem na początku było spanie. Spaliśmy w specjalnych śpiworach, które były przymocowane podobnie jak hamaki. Śpiwór sięgał mi do szyi, głowa była na zewnątrz i cały czas unosiła się w powietrzu. Kiedy zasypiałem moja głowa cały czas krążyła, przez co bez przerwy się budziłem. Na ziemi raczej się o tym nie myśli - kładziesz głowę na poduszce i grawitacja ją tam utrzymuje. W kosmosie, kiedy nie ma grawitacji naprawdę nie wiadomo co ze sobą zrobić. Przyzwyczaiłem się do tego po dwóch dniach. Ale wracając na ziemie znowu musisz przyzwyczajać do życia z grawitacją - mówił astronauta.

Uczniowie pytali także jak ocenia pomysły kolonizacji innych planet.

- Wydaje mi się, że musimy to zrobić. Ciekawie byłoby skolonizować Marsa. Może ktoś z tej sali wynajdzie taki silnik, który pozwoli nam dostać się do odległych galaktyk. W czasie mojego lotu patrzyłem nie tylko w kierunku ziemi, ale także w bezkres wszechświata. Mam wrażenie, że nie do końca rozumiemy w jakim miejscu się znajdujemy - powiedział Alfred Merrill Worden.

Jedna z uczennic dopytywała, jak odczuwa się upływ czasu w kosmosie. Astronauta odpowiedział, że uczestnicy nie odczuli większej zmiany. Choć jak przyznał na Ziemie wrócił nieco młodszy.

- Jeśli wierzyć w teorie względności Einsteina, to w czasie naszego lotu zyskaliśmy na czasie dwie dziesiąte sekundy. Więc po powrocie na Ziemię jestem młodszy o dwie dziesiąte sekundy - mówił astronauta.

Uczniowie chcieli się także dowiedzieć czy pułkownik będąc w ich wieku myślał o tym, że kiedyś zostanie astronautą.

- Kiedy byłem w waszym wieku nie myślałem o locie w kosmos, ale zawsze wiedziałem, że chce coś zrobić ze swoim życiem. Musze zdobyć dobre wykształcenie i zrobiłem w tym kierunku wszystko co było możliwe. Skoncentrowałem się na tym, aby zostać najlepszym pilotem. Kiedy osiągnąłem swój cel, wtedy skontaktowała się ze mną agencja NASA i zaproponowała mi udział w misji i locie na księżyc. Dlatego moim zdaniem najważniejsze co możecie zrobić to podążać za marzeniami, starać się z całych sił i wtedy zobaczycie, że przed wami są niezliczone możliwości.

Jan Dobrowolski uczeń szkoły przekonywał, że spotkanie było bardzo wartościowe.

- Pan Worden bardzo mi zaimponował. Uważam, że takie świadectwo jest potrzebne bardzo wielu ludziom, bo inspiruje i motywuje do pracy. Słowa, że należy się uczyć, że należy spełniać marzenia dają do myślenia - mówił uczeń.

Misja Apollo 15 zapisała się w historii jako misja z najdłuższym czasem pobytu na powierzchni Księżyca. Astronauci wylądowali na jego powierzchni 30 lipca 1971 roku. Na potrzeby zadania po raz pierwszy użyto specjalnie skonstruowanego pojazdu LRV, który pokonał na powierzchni Księżyca odległość około 28 kilometrów. W czasie wyprawy zebrano dla NASA ponad 70 kilogramów próbek księżycowych skał i gruntu.

Astronauci podczas 3 wyjść na powierzchnię Księżyca przebywali poza lądownikiem łącznie około 19 godzin.


Spotkanie z pułkownikiem Alfredem Marrillem Wordenem
Kielce. 04.09.2019 / Fot. Wiktor Dziarmaga / Radio Kielce

Intel Core i5-2320 3GHz/8GB RAM/AMD Radeon HD 7700 Series/HD 1 TB/Sony DVD ROM...

Online mss

  • Moderator
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 4796
  • Space is not only about science, it is a vision,
    • Astronauci i ich loty...
Odp: Alfred Merrill Worden 07.02.1932
« Odpowiedź #9 dnia: Wrzesień 04, 2019, 20:48 »
https://kronika24.pl/alfred-merrill-worden-pulkownik-wreczyl-dudzie-ksiezycowa-flage/

Cytuj
Astronauta Alfred Merrill Worden. Pułkownik wręczył Dudzie księżycową flagę

Międzynarodowy Salon Przemysłu Obronnego
redakcja 4 września 2019


Pułkownik Alfred Merrill Worden wręczył Andrzejowi Dudzie flagę, którą miał ze sobą podczas lotu na Księżyc w lipcu 1971 roku (fot. Eliza Radzikowska-Białobrzewska/KPRP)

Ponad 600 firm z 31 krajów bierze udział w Kielcach w 27. Międzynarodowym Salonie Przemysłu Obronnego (MSPO).

– Chcę, by nasza produkcja zbrojeniowa była jak najnowocześniejsza i byśmy byli w tym zakresie innowacyjni, bo Polska jest krajem ambitnym i chcemy by bezpieczeństwo ojczyzny i naszego regionu Europy zapewniane było w jak najdoskonalszy sposób – powiedział Andrzej Duda, który wziął udział w inauguracji tego najważniejszego wydarzenia branży zbrojeniowej w Europie Środkowo-Wschodniej.

Tegorocznej edycji towarzyszy Wystawa Narodowa Stanów Zjednoczonych. Jej gościem honorowym jest astronauta, pułkownik United States Air Force, uczestnik misji Apollo 15, Alfred Merrill Worden. Pułkownik wręczył Andrzejowi Dudzie flagę, którą miał ze sobą podczas lotu na Księżyc w lipcu 1971 roku.

(...)
Intel Core i5-2320 3GHz/8GB RAM/AMD Radeon HD 7700 Series/HD 1 TB/Sony DVD ROM...

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10402
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Alfred Merrill Worden 07.02.1932
« Odpowiedź #10 dnia: Wrzesień 04, 2019, 21:55 »
Uczestnik misji Apollo 15 honorowym gościem targów w Kielcach
SJ, TM 03.09.2019, 08:51

Gościem honorowym 27. Międzynarodowego Salonu Przemysłu Obrony (MSPO) w Kielcach jest uczestnik misji Apollo 15, płk USAF Alfred Merrill Worden. Niemal 50 lat temu amerykański astronauta jako pierwszy odbył spacer kosmiczny w rekordowej odległości od Ziemi.

Worden wspominał, że był już w Polsce na początku lat 70. Jak stwierdził, wiele się od tego czasu zmieniło.

– W szczególności jestem podekscytowany faktem, że Polska ma teraz swoją agencję kosmiczną. Spotkaliśmy się dziś z jej przedstawicielami i z radością usłyszałem ich doniesienia, że są niesłychanie „agresywni” w swoich działaniach. Mam nadzieję, że będę z nimi współpracował – mówił.

87-letni dziś płk Alfred M. Worden był pilotem modułu dowodzenia Endeavour podczas misji Apollo 15 w 1971 r. i pierwszym człowiekiem, który odbył spacer kosmiczny w rekordowej odległości od Ziemi – 315 000 km (196 tys. mil). Worden wyszedł ze statku kosmicznego, aby dotrzeć do modułu silnikowego i ustalić przyczyny awarii mechanizmu wysuwania kamery i spektrometru masowego. Z kamer astronauta przyniósł na statek filmy nakręcone podczas misji.

Worden jest gościem honorowym 27. Międzynarodowego Salonu Przemysłu Obrony (MSPO) w Kielcach. Dzień wcześniej astronauta brał udział w zorganizowanym w Krakowie spotkaniu na zaproszenie przedsiębiorstwa telekomunikacyjnego Motoroli Solutions.

Tegoroczny MSPO rozpoczął się we wtorek i potrwa do piątku. Udział w targach potwierdziło ponad 600 firm, a ponad połowa z nich to wystawcy zagraniczni z 31 państw. (...)
https://www.tvp.info/44213815/uczestnik-misji-apollo-15-honorowym-gosciem-targow-w-kielcach

Alfred Worden, uczestnik misji Apollo 15, odwiedził Kraków [ZDJĘCIA]
RED.2 września


https://krakow.naszemiasto.pl/alfred-worden-uczestnik-misji-apollo-15-odwiedzil-krakow/ar/c13-7321915

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10402
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Alfred Merrill Worden 07.02.1932
« Odpowiedź #11 dnia: Wrzesień 04, 2019, 21:56 »
Płk Alfred Worden: w eksploracji kosmosu najważniejsza jest współpraca
03.09.2019


Amerykański astronauta, płk Alfred Worden. Fot. PAP/Jacek Bednarczyk 02.09.2019

W eksploracji kosmosu najważniejsza jest współpraca. Myślę, że każde państwo, nawet małe, może w przyszłość świętować triumf na tym polu, może mieć ogromny wkład w locie człowieka na Marsa – ocenił w poniedziałek w Krakowie astronauta, pilot NASA płk Alfred M. Worden.

Płk Alfred M. Worden był pilotem modułu dowodzenia Endeavour podczas misji Apollo 15 w 1971 r. i pierwszym człowiekiem, który odbył spacer kosmiczny w rekordowej odległości od Ziemi - 315 000 km.

87-letni dziś astronauta przyleciał do Krakowa na zaproszenie przedsiębiorstwa telekomunikacyjnego Motoroli Solutions, które w Krakowie ma drugą największą po USA siedzibę i zatrudnia w dawnej stolicy Polski ok. 2 tys. osób. Rozwiązania technologiczne Motoroli i współpraca z NASA od dekad zapewniały komunikację pomiędzy Ziemią a astronautami w kosmosie.

Worden podczas poniedziałkowego spotkania z pracownikami korporacji w Krakowie oraz z dziennikarzami wspominał swój lot na Księżyc i podkreślał, jak ważna w kosmosie jest komunikacja o znaczeniu krytycznym – czyli komunikacja możliwa dzięki zaawansowanym technologiom, potrzebna służbom bezpieczeństwa w razie katastrof, wojen i innych sytuacji krytycznych.

Alfred M. Worden pod koniec misji Apollo 15, już podczas powrotu na Ziemię, 5 sierpnia 1971 r., odbył spacer kosmiczny w rekordowej odległości od Ziemi – 315 tys. km (196 tys. mil). Worden wyszedł ze statku kosmicznego, aby dotrzeć do modułu silnikowego i ustalić przyczyny awarii mechanizmu wysuwania kamery i spektrometru masowego. Z kamer astronauta przyniósł na statek filmy nakręcone podczas misji.

„Spędziłem 38 minut, pracując w próżni kosmicznej, mając równocześnie doskonały widok na Ziemię, jak i na Księżyc. Moim jedynym połączeniem z załogą był system komunikacji, który stanowił jeden z najważniejszych elementów sprzętu” – wspominał swój kosmiczny spacer amerykański astronauta.

Zapytany o to, co czuł podczas tego spaceru odpowiedział, że nie myślał o tym, co czuje, tylko koncentrował się na swoim zadaniu.

Uczestnicy spotkanie pytali Wordena m.in. o współczesny „kosmiczny wyścig”. Odpowiadając na to pytanie przyznał, że nie lubi mówić o kosmicznych wyścigach, o rywalizacji między USA a Rosją, USA a Chinami. W jego ocenie w eksploracji kosmosu najważniejsza jest współpraca, ponieważ programy badań kosmosu, w tym lotu na Marsa, są drogie - zbyt drogie do realizacji przez jeden kraj. „Myślę, że każde państwo, nawet małe, może w przyszłość świętować trumf na tym polu, może mieć ogromny wkład w locie człowieka na Marsa” – powiedział.

Zdaniem astronauty człowiek postawi stopę na Marsie później, niż się ludziom wydaje, czyli nie za kilka, kilkanaście lat, ale za 30, 40. „Promieniowanie słoneczne byłoby ogromnym problemem dla człowieka na Marsie. Nie wiemy, jakie skutki by miało, co by się stało z naszym mózgiem” – zwrócił uwagę.

Wspominając misję Apollo 15, Worden podkreślił żartobliwie, że w kosmosie trzeba mieć dużo poczucia humoru. Mówił też o potrzebie pozostania w formie, o regularnych ćwiczeniach fizycznych - przed lotem i w czasie lotu.

Poza spotkaniem w Krakowie Worden będzie również uczestniczył w 27. Międzynarodowym Salonie Przemysłu Obrony (MSPO) w Kielcach, jako gość honorowy amerykańskiego pawilonu, zorganizowanego przez Kallman Worldwide.

Celem misji Apollo 15 były m.in. zebranie próbek gruntu Srebrnego Globu w rejonie księżycowych Apeninów i Szczelin Hadleya i ocena długotrwałego pobytu astronautów na powierzchni Księżyca. W misji udział wzięli: dowódca misji David R. Scott, pilot modułu dowodzenia Alfred M. Worden i pilot modułu księżycowego James B. Irwin.

Podczas misji Al Worden samotnie okrążył Księżyc, a Scott i Irwin stanęli na powierzchni Księżyca - przemierzyli po powierzchni Srebrnego Globu prawie 28 km w ciągu ponad 18 i pół godziny, zebrali w tym czasie 70 próbek o masie ponad 77 kg. Apollo 15 był dziewiątą misją załogowego amerykańskiego programu Apollo i czwartym lądowaniem na Księżycu. Była to pierwsza misja charakteryzująca się dłuższym, trzydniowym, pobytem na Księżycu i skupiająca się w większym stopniu niż wcześniejsze na badaniach i obserwacjach naukowych. Była to też pierwsza misja, po której astronauci nie przechodzili kwarantanny.

Motorola świętuje w tym roku 50-lecie lądowania człowieka na Księżycu. “To jest mały krok dla człowieka, ale wielki skok dla ludzkości” – to słynne słowa wypowiedziane przez astronautę Neila Armstronga zostały przekazane na Ziemię w 1969 r. za pomocą przekaźnika S-Band, sprzętu marki Motorola Solutions.

Dyrektor generalny tej firmy w Polsce Jacek Drabik zaznaczył, że firma przez dekady dostarczała sprzęt radiowy dla lotów kosmicznych. „Dzisiaj wchodzimy w nową erę bezpieczeństwa publicznego. Dzięki innowacjom technologicznym w komunikacji o znaczeniu krytycznym, programom dla centrów dowodzenia, rozwiązaniom bezpieczeństwa publicznego w oparciu o wideo wykorzystujące sztuczną inteligencję oraz usługom zarządzania i wsparcia, dokładamy wszelkich starań, by kontynuować tworzenie pionierskich kamieni milowych” – powiedział.(PAP)

Autor: Beata Kołodziej
http://naukawpolsce.pap.pl/aktualnosci/news%2C78436%2Cplk-alfred-worden-w-eksploracji-kosmosu-najwazniejsza-jest-wspolpraca.html

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10402
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Alfred Merrill Worden 07.02.1932
« Odpowiedź #12 dnia: Wrzesień 04, 2019, 22:05 »
Pułkownik Alfred Merril Worden, pilot uczestniczący w misji Apollo 15 na spotkaniu w kieleckim liceum (WIDEO)
OPRAC. KLUM4 września

Gość Międzynarodowego Salonu Przemysłu Obronnego 2019 pułkownik Alfred Merril Worden, pilot modułu dowodzenia misji APOLLO 15, spotkał się z młodzieżą w Katolickim Liceum Ogólnokształcącym imienia świętego Stanisława Kostki.

(...)

- Żyliśmy według czasu Houston, kiedy pracowali w Houston my też pracowaliśmy. Kiedy pracownicy NASA szli spać, my również odpoczywaliśmy

- opowiadał pułkownik Worden.

(...)

Uczniowie interesowali się też różnicą czasu między Ziemią a przestrzenią kosmiczną. Okazało się, że dzięki podróży w Kosmos w 1971 roku pułkownik jest młodszy o 0,2 sekundy.

Zapytany o najszczęśliwszy moment 13-dniowej misji odpowiedział:

- Nasz statek był wielkości volkswagena garbusa. Najszczęśliwszy byłem, kiedy moi koledzy David Randolph Scott i James Benson Irwin opuścili moduł i zostałem sam - żartował pułkownik. (...)

https://kielce.naszemiasto.pl/pulkownik-alfred-merril-worden-pilot-uczestniczacy-w-misji/ar/c1-7324721

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10402
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Alfred Merrill Worden 07.02.1932
« Odpowiedź #13 dnia: Wrzesień 04, 2019, 22:10 »
Kraków 2 września 2019

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6WsS4xwyFn4" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6WsS4xwyFn4</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6WsS4xwyFn4

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 10402
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Alfred Merrill Worden 07.02.1932
« Odpowiedź #14 dnia: Wrzesień 04, 2019, 22:42 »
Astronauta misji Apollo 15: W przetrwaniu pomogła mi codzienna rutyna
PIOTR DRABIK 04.09.2019 19:07


fot. Piotr Drabik

Byłem szczęśliwy, mając taką właśnie pracę. Nie denerwowałem się, bo byłem na to przygotowany - tak o podróży na Księżyc mówił płk Al Worden, amerykański astronauta i uczestnik misji Apollo 15. W krótkiej rozmowie z portalem RadioZET.pl opowiedział o kulisach misji sprzed 48 lat.

Na pytanie, jak spędził noc przed startem Apollo 15, odpowiedział: - Zastanawiałem się, gdzie jest mój szampan. Podczas spotkania w Krakowie pułkownik Alfred Worden, 87-letni amerykański astronauta, często żartował.

Tradycyjnie - co można zobaczyć na nagraniach z innych wywiadów - i tym razem był ubrany w jasnoniebieską kurtkę z naszywkami NASA (Narodowa Agencja Aeronautyki i Przestrzeni Kosmicznej) i emblematem misji Apollo 15.

Worden był jednym z 24 astronautów, którzy wzięli udział w załogowych misjach księżycowych. W stronę Srebrnego Globu poleciał 26 lipca 1971 roku wraz z Davidem Scottem i Jamesem Irwinem. Kiedy oni spacerowali po Księżycu, Worden przez trzy dni samotnie krążył wokół Księżyca w statku dowodzenia misji Endeavour.

Pomimo że taki sam scenariusz był podczas pozostałych sześciu załogowych misji księżycowych, to właśnie jemu Księga Rekordów Guinnessa przyznała tytuł „najbardziej odizolowanego człowieka w historii”.

W oczekiwaniu na kolegów, Worden wybrał się na kosmiczny spacer. Przez 38 minut przebywał poza statkiem kosmicznym, aby dotrzeć do modułu silnikowego i spróbować naprawić mechanizm wysuwania się jednej z kamer. Jak wspominał, miał wówczas idealny widok zarówno na Księżyc, jak na Ziemię.

Nikt wcześniej, ani później nie znajdował się w otwartym Wszechświecie tak daleko od Ziemi – dokładnie 315 000 kilometrów. Pierwszy, i jedyny dla Wordena lot kosmiczny, zakończył się 7 sierpnia 1971 roku, kiedy załoga Apollo 15 bezpiecznie wylądował na Pacyfiku.

Od małej farmy w stanie Michigan, po prestiżową akademię wojskową West Point, służbę w siłach powietrznych Stanów Zjednoczonych, aż do elitarnego grona księżycowych astronautów programu Apollo. Życie Alfreda Wordena – podobnie jak księżycowy krajobraz – było pełne wzlotów i upadków.

Pomimo bardzo udanej misji księżycowej, astronauta nie wrócił już do lotów w kosmos. Powód?

Załoga Apollo 15 - bez konsultacji z NASA - zabrała na pokład statku prawie 400 kopert ze znaczkami. Jedną czwartą kupił niemiecki filatelista, a zyski z transakcji astronauci rozdzielili między siebie. Tłumaczenie, że pieniądze mają być zabezpieczeniem na przyszłość ich dzieci, nie pomogło. Choć w działaniu Wordena, Iriwna i Scotta nie było nic nielegalnego, to NASA jednak przykładnie ukarała całą trójkę zakazem kolejnych lotów w kosmos.

Znacznie chętniej niż o tamtej sprawie, Worden opowiadał o kulisach księżycowej misji. Miejsce spotkania z astronautą nie było przypadkowe. Amerykańska firma Motorola Solutions, która w Polsce ma swoją siedzibę w Krakowie, opracowała w latach 60. ubiegłego stulecia cały system komunikacji pomiędzy statkiem kosmicznym a kontrolą lotów.

Otoczony przez dziennikarzy gość zza oceanu w końcu podchodzi do stolika, gdzie udało nam się zadać mu kilka pytań.

Jak czuje się astronauta w chwili, gdy jest najbardziej odizolowanym człowiekiem w historii?

- Przyznano mi taki tytuł w Księdze Rekordów Guinnessa, ale myślę, że to nonsens. Wcale nie czułem się najbardziej samotną osobą w historii. Te trzy dni, były najlepsze w moim życiu.

Czy bał się pan samotnie okrążając Księżyc?

- Nie, dlaczego miałbym się bać? Byłem szczęśliwy mając taką właśnie pracę. Nie denerwowałem się, bo byłem na to przygotowany. W przetrwaniu w tak trudnych warunków pomagała codzienna rutyna na orbicie Księżyca.

Okrążył pan Srebrny Glob 74 razy. Co pan robił w tym czasie?

- Byłem zajęty 24 godziny na dobę. Wykonywałem mnóstwo fotografii powierzchni Księżyca oraz innych zjawisk. Czasami to były pierwsze zdjęcia wybranych części Księżyca. Ponadto, wykonywałem wizualne obserwacje kosmosu i przeprowadzałem badania naukowe.

Dlaczego to właśnie pan nie wylądował na Księżycu?

- Dlaczego myślisz, że samo lądowanie na Księżycu jest tak istotne? To nie jest ważne, jeśli jesteś członkiem programu Apollo. To bardzo proste - jeśli jesteś dobrym pilotem i dowódcą na Ziemi, to jedyne czego potrzebujesz w misji Apollo, to nauczyć się jak latać wokół Księżyca. Astronauci, którzy lądowali na Księżycu, byli moimi pasażerami. To odpowiedzialne zajęcie sprowadzić ich bezpiecznie z powrotem.

Czy pana zdaniem komercjalizacja podboju kosmosu to szansa czy zagrożenie?

- Dla mnie na przykład firma taka, jak SpaceX Elona Muska, nie jest zwykłą cywilnym przedsiębiorstwem. Kto płaci SpaceX? NASA. To żadna nowość. Firma North American Rockwell, która w latach 60. XX wieku budowała statki kosmiczne dla misji Apollo, też była opłacana przez NASA. Moim zdaniem to żadna komercja. Jedyną osobą, która sobie może na to pozwolić jest Jeff Bezos (miliarder i założyciel firmy Blue Origin – przyp. red.), ponieważ on sam opłaca swoje projekty. Nie jest zależny od finansowania z zewnątrz.

Czy może pan sobie wyobrazić polską flagą na Księżycu albo Marsie?

- To nie będzie dla mnie zaskakujące. Będę o wiele bardziej zdumiony, jeśli wy będziecie na to gotowi.

(Dzień po wizycie w Krakowie, astronauta przekazał prezydentowi Andrzejowi Dudzie w Kielcach polską flagę, która znalazła się na pokładzie statku kosmicznego podczas misji Apollo 15).


fot. Jan Bielecki/East News

https://wiadomosci.radiozet.pl/Polska/Al-Worden-astronauta-misji-ksiezycowej-Apollo-15-W-przetrwaniu-pomogla-mi-codzienna-rutyna