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Online Orionid

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Odp: Starty rakiet (IV kwartał 2019 roku)
« Odpowiedź #15 dnia: Październik 12, 2019, 07:42 »
ICON w końcu na orbicie
  11.10. o 00:31 z pasa 13/31 na Cape Canaveral wystartował samolot L-1011 "Stargazer". Podwieszona pod nim rakieta
Pegasus-XL została zrzucona o 01:59:00, a o 01:59:05 nastąpił zapłon silnika jej pierwszego stopnia. Rakieta wyniosła
w T+8' 20" na orbitę o parametrach: hp=569 km, ha=569 km, i=26,99° satelitę naukowego ICON (Ionospheric Connection
Explorer).
http://lk.astronautilus.pl/n191001.htm#04

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=euCA45ZaFik" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=euCA45ZaFik</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=euCA45ZaFik

Pegasus launches ICON space science mission
by Jeff Foust — October 11, 2019


A Northrop Grumman Pegasus XL rocket, attached to its L-1011 aircraft, prior to the launch of the ICON satellite Oct. 10. Credit: Northrop Grumman

LAS CRUCES, N.M. — A long-delayed NASA space science satellite finally reached orbit Oct. 10 on a Pegasus rocket, a launch vehicle with an uncertain future.

The Pegasus XL rocket was released from its L-1011 carrier aircraft at 9:59 p.m. Eastern off the Florida coast and ignited its motors to ascend to orbit. Its payload, the Ionospheric Connection Explorer, or ICON, was released from the upper stage in low Earth orbit about 11 minutes after ignition.

NASA scheduled the launch for 9:30 p.m. Eastern but a communications glitch shortly before the planned release led to a half-hour delay. NASA scrubbed a launch attempt Oct. 9 hours before the plane’s takeoff from Cape Canaveral because of poor weather in the area.

Those delays, though, pale in comparison to issues with the Pegasus rocket that delayed its launch by about two years. That included a case where the rocket’s rudder position indicator became active, but only while the rocket was attached to the aircraft at cruise altitudes.

“We saw some things on our previous launch attempt that none of us were comfortable with, and we decided to stand down and go address those,” said Phil Joyce, vice president of space launch programs at Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems, at a pre-launch briefing Oct. 8. That previous launch attempt, also based out of Cape Canaveral, was in November 2018.

Joyce described the issue with the rocket as “one of the most challenging that I’ve seen.” He said the rudder on the rocket’s first stage showed “noise spikes” in its position indicator, only at altitude. “We didn’t understand those, but they were significant enough that we were concerned if, we launched with that condition present, that those noise spikes could couple into our control system and cause a bad day.”

He said that the problem could be linked to “several causal factors” that the company addressed by modifying electronics in the rocket as well as making a feedback circuit more robust to the environmental conditions of flight. That was tested on several captive carry flights, including a ferry flight from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California to Cape Canaveral, giving Northrop and NASA confidence they had resolved the problem.

The ICON launch was the 44th Pegasus mission in the rocket’s nearly three-decade history, but also only the fourth launch in the last 10 years. Despite the growing interest in small satellites, for which Pegasus was designed to launch, the vehicle has only been used in recent years for a handful of NASA science missions.

Even that limited business is now in jeopardy. In July, NASA awarded a contract to SpaceX for the Falcon 9 launch of the Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) astronomy mission, a smallsat that had been designed to be compatible with the Pegasus XL rocket. The value of the Falcon 9 IXPE contract was $50.2 million, less than the $56.4 million value of the 2014 contract NASA awarded for the ICON launch on a Pegasus XL, even though the Falcon 9 is a far larger vehicle.

At the pre-launch briefing, Joyce acknowledged that the company has no future missions on the Pegasus XL manifest. He did note there are two Pegasus rockets at Vandenberg “in a pretty advanced state of integration” that are available. “We’re talking to several potential customers for those,” he said.

Those two rockets, industry sources say, were being built for Stratolaunch, the venture backed by the late Paul Allen that planned to launch Pegasus rockets from the giant aircraft it developed. That plane flew a single test flight in April, but the lack of activity since has fueled speculation that the company may be winding down.

The 288-kilogram ICON satellite will study the interaction between space weather and terrestrial weather in the ionosphere that could improve modeling of space weather activity. “It’s this region where these two weather systems, space weather and terrestrial weather, are mixing together,” said Nicola Fox, director of NASA’s heliophysics division, at the Oct. 8 briefing. “It’s really, really important for us to go understand that.”

Despite the delays, Fox said that the mission remained with its cost cap of $252 million. NASA didn’t make major changes to ICON during the extended launch delay, but she said the mission should benefit from data from other, complementary missions collected during this time. “If anything,” she said, “we’re a little more excited about ICON is going to bring to us.”
https://spacenews.com/pegasus-launches-icon-space-science-mission/

Timeline for Pegasus XL’s launch with NASA’s ICON satellite
October 9, 2019 Stephen Clark


https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/10/09/timeline-for-pegasus-xls-launch-with-nasas-icon-satellite/

Pegasus rocket ready for airborne launch with NASA scientific satellite
October 8, 2019 Stephen Clark


A Northrop Grumman Pegasus XL rocket is mounted underneath an L-1011 carrier jet, which will fire the launcher into orbit as soon as Wednesday night off Florida’s east coast. Credit: NASA/ Ben Smegelsky

(...) Two launch campaigns last year were cut short by erroneous data signatures that showed movement on the Pegasus rocket’s rudder, one of three aerodynamic control surfaces on the solid-fueled rocket’s winged first stage.

“It was the rudder actuator (where) we were seeing some anomalous position feedback readings, basically noise spikes in the feedback line,” said Phil Joyce, vice president of space launch programs at Northrop Grumman. We didn’t understand those, but they were significant enough that we were concerned that, if we launched with that condition present, those noise spikes could couple into our control system and cause a bad day.”

Engineers from Northrop Grumman and NASA spent 11 months analyzing the problem, testing hardware, developing corrective actions, and then preparing the Pegasus XL rocket and the ICON satellite for another try at launching. (...)
https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/10/08/pegasus-rocket-ready-for-airborne-launch-with-nasa-scientific-satellite/

NASA satellite to study ionosphere launches after two-year delay
October 11, 2019 Stephen Clark


Artist’s illustration of the Ionospheric Connection Explorer satellite. Credit: NASA

(...) ICON will begin regular scientific observations in late November with a suite of four instruments.

“ICON has an important job to do – to help us understand the dynamic space environment near our home,” said Nicky Fox, director for heliophysics at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “ICON will be the first mission to simultaneously track what’s happening in Earth’s upper atmosphere and in space to see how the two interact, causing the kind of changes that can disrupt our communications systems.”

The launch of NASA’s ICON satellite was the 44th satellite delivery mission for the Pegasus rocket since its debut in 1990. Originally developed by Orbital Sciences Corp., now part of Northrop Grumman, the Pegasus rocket has accomplished 30 consecutive successful satellite launches with Thursday night’s mission.

But the future of the Pegasus rocket, once a workhorse for NASA’s small satellite programs, is unclear after the long-delayed ICON launch.

There are no more missions on the Pegasus rocket’s manifest, and a recent NASA launch contract that was expected to likely be awarded to Northrop Grumman for a Pegasus flight went to SpaceX instead.

The Pegasus is not competitive in the commercial launch market because of its high price, but Northrop Grumman, and its predecessor Orbital Sciences, found a niche market for the Pegasus in recent years to loft NASA satellites that needed dedicated launches into unique, mission-specific orbits.

Northrop Grumman has hardware in inventory for two more Pegasus XL rockets. Those vehicles were purchased by Stratolaunch, a company founded by the late Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, to launch of its own giant rocket carrier aircraft. (...)

Like the Pegasus XL launcher, the ICON satellite was built by Northrop Grumman. It’s based on the company’s LEOStar 2 satellite bus.

The ICON mission will investigate the link between conditions in the ionosphere, which scientists long thought was primarily driven by solar activity, and weather deeper in Earth’s atmosphere.

“The ionosphere is the densest plasma in space between us and the sun, and that plasma has a number of effects on systems that we use every day,” said Thomas Immel, ICON’s principal investigator from the University of California, Berkeley.

Immel proposed the ICON mission to NASA, and the agency selected the ICON proposal for development in 2013.

The ICON mission will study “how weather in our lower atmosphere, the weather we experience from day to day, influences conditions in space,” Immel said. “This coupling of the lower atmosphere to the upper atmosphere is a new science topic for NASA.”


NASA’s ICON mission will orbit above the upper atmosphere, through the bottom edge of near-Earth space. Here it will be able to observe how interactions between terrestrial weather and a layer of charged particles called the ionosphere creates changes in the space environment — including bright swaths of color in the atmosphere called airglow.
Credits: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/ICON


Previous satellite missions detected the unexpected coupling between plasma waves and winds in the ionosphere and terrestrial weather systems.

“What we discovered, using data from a NASA mission called IMAGE, was that this region of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere was actually responding to effects related to weather systems near Earth’s surface,” said Scott England, ICON project scientist based at Virginia Tech. “This was really unexpected at the time, to see a connection. Where the charged particles were, how many there were, how dense the gas was — they were responding to weather patterns near the surface of the Earth.”

“We saw with those missions that the density in the ionosphere varied in response to changes in the rainy seasons in the tropics,” Immel said. “The new mission of ICON is to focus on that topic, and we’re carrying the instruments to invesitgate that region.

“We think focusing on that will give us a real key to understanding and making better predictions for space weather,” he said.

ICON carries four types of instruments developed at the University of California, Berkeley, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the University of Texas at Dallas.

Another NASA mission named GOLD — short for Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk — has objectives that intersect with ICON’s planned observations.

GOLD is mounted on a geostationary satellite more than 22,000 miles (nearly 36,000 kilometers) over the equator, providing wide-area views of the airglow in the ionosphere.

“ICON is going to come along and provide those in situ measurements, flying right through some of those plasma bubbles that we’ve been imaging with GOLD for a year now,” Fox said.

If ICON had launched on its original schedule, it would have been in space before GOLD.

“There has been a two-year delay,” Fox said. “We have learned a little bit more science. We now have a year’s worth of GOLD images, so I think, if anything, we’re even more excited about what ICON is going to bring to us.”
https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/10/11/nasa-satellite-to-study-ionosphere-launches-after-two-year-delay/

Rockets purchased by Stratolaunch back under Northrop Grumman control
October 10, 2019 Stephen Clark


File photo of a Pegasus XL rocket inside the Building 1555 processing facility at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. Credit: NASA/Randy Beaudoin

(...) The airborne launch of NASA’s Ionospheric Connection Explorer, or ICON, scientific satellite Thursday night off Florida’s east coast is the final scheduled flight of a Pegasus XL rocket. Variants of the solid-fueled Pegasus rocket have flown on 43 satellite delivery missions since 1990.

“We actually purchased those back (from Stratolaunch),” Joyce said in an interview with Spaceflight Now. “So they’re in a very advanced state of integration, which means they’re available for a very rapid response launch. We could launch one of those in six months, the second one probably in eight (months).

“We’ve been talking with NASA and several other customers about potential use of those for the near-term,” Joyce said. “There are some interesting opportunities.”

Orders of Pegasus rockets have tailed off over the last few years as new, lower-cost launch options become available to NASA, the sole Pegasus customer since 2008. Northrop Grumman’s rocket division, then known as Orbital Sciences, won a $56.3 million contract to launch the ICON mission in 2014. The launch has been delayed more than two years due to technical problems with the Pegasus rocket.

The Pegasus rocket is carried aloft by a modified L-1011 aircraft — the last of its kind still operational — to an altitude of 39,000 feet (11,900 meters), then released to fire into orbit.

The handover of the Pegasus rockets back to Northrop Grumman is another sign of a turbulent year at Statolaunch since Allen’s death last October. Stratolaunch is part of Vulcan Inc., a holding company established by Allen, a Microsoft co-founder.
https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/10/10/rockets-purchased-by-stratolaunch-back-under-northrop-grumman-control/

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2019/10/nasas-icon-launch-ngis-pegasus-xl-rocket/
https://news.northropgrumman.com/news/releases/northrop-grumman-successfully-launches-nasa-icon-satellite-on-pegasus-rocket

https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/explorer_icon.htm
« Ostatnia zmiana: Październik 12, 2019, 23:03 wysłana przez Orionid »

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Odp: Starty rakiet (IV kwartał 2019 roku)
« Odpowiedź #16 dnia: Październik 17, 2019, 21:08 »

PAŹDZIERNIK 2019

04    18:51             Taiyuan 9         CZ-3C                Gaofen-10[R]
09    10:17:56          Bajkonur 200/39   Proton-M/Briz-M      Eutelsat 5 West B, MEV-1
11    01:30-03:00       Canaveral 13/31   L-1011/Pegasus-XL    ICON
17    01:22             Onenui 1          Electron/Curie       Palisade Demo-1
17    15:21:04          Xichang           CZ-3B/G2             TJ-4
__________________________________________________________________________________________
3D    ??:??             Canaveral 40      Falcon-9             Starlink v1.0 x 60
??    ??:??             Jiuquan           KZ-1A                Jilin-1 Gaofen-02A
??    ??:??             Plesieck 43/4     Sojuz-2.1a/Fregat    Kosmos (Nejtron)
??    ??:??             Jiuquan           KZ-1A                ?

LISTOPAD 2019

02    13:59             Wallops 0A        Antares-230          Cygnus-12
04    ??:??             Canaveral 40      Falcon-9             Starlink v1.0 x 60
16    ??:??             Sriharikota S     PSLV                 Cartosat-3, ? v 12
19    ??:??             Bajkonur 31/6     Sojuz-2.16/Fregat-M  OneWeb x 34
19    ??:??             Onenui 1          Electron/Curie       ANDESITE
22    ??:??             Kourou 3          Ariane-5ECA          Inmarsat 5 F5, ?
29    ??:??             Plesieck 133/3    Rokot/Briz-KM        Goniec-M 23, 25, 26, BLITS-M
??    ??:??             Sriharikota F     PSLV-CA              RISAT-2BR1
??    ??:??             Xichang           CZ-3A                Beidou-3I3Q
??    ??:??             Mojave 12/30      B-747/LauncherOne    MiniCarb, PAN A, PAN B, STP-27VP (x 8?)
??    ??:??             KSC 39A           Falcon-9             Anasis II
??    ??:??             Jiuquan 43/94     CZ-2D                ETRSS-1
??    ??:??             Jiuquan 43/94     CZ-2D                Gaofen-7
??    ??:??             Onenui 1          Electron/Curie       MCNAIR
??    ??:??             Onenui 1          Electron/Curie       ATL-1, Discovery, FossaSat-1, NOOR-1A,
                                                               NOOR-1B, SMOG-P, TRSI Sat

GRUDZIEŃ 2019

01    ??:??             Bajkonur 31/6     Sojuz-2.1a           Progress MS-13
02    ??:??             Plesieck 43/3     Sojuz-2.1b/Fregat-M  Kosmos (Uragan-M)
04    ??:??             KSC 39A           Falcon-9             Dragon-19
17   ~12:45             Canaveral 41      Atlas-5/422          Starliner Boe-OFT
??    ??:??             Taiyuan 16        CZ-6                 Satellogic x 16
Waldemar Zwierzchlejski
http://lk.astronautilus.pl

Online Orionid

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« Odpowiedź #17 dnia: Październik 19, 2019, 00:20 »
Kolejny start Electrona
  17.10. o 01:22 z Onenui Station wystrzelona została RN Electron/Curie, która wyniosła w T+1h 10' 36" na orbitę
o parametrach: hp=1162 km, ha=1223 km, i=87,82º satelitę Palisade Demo-1.
http://lk.astronautilus.pl/n191016.htm#01

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxXOet5tAGU" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxXOet5tAGU</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxXOet5tAGU

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJg20I0o50U" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJg20I0o50U</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJg20I0o50U

Rakieta Electron wynosi Palisade Demo-1
BY KRZYSZTOF KANAWKA ON 20 PAŹDZIERNIKA 2019


Ujęcie z lotu rakiety Electron - 17.10.2019 / Credits - RocketLab

Siedemnastego października nastąpił udany lot rakiety Electron. Na pokładzie znalazł się satelita o nazwie Palisade Demo-1.

Start rakiety Electron nastąpił 17 października o godzinie 03:22 CEST. Start odbył się z wyrzutni Onenui 1 na Nowej Zelandii.

Na pokładzie rakiety znalazł się jeden satelita – Palisade Demo-1. Ten satelita należy do amerykańskiej firmy Astro Digital, aktywnej na rynku obserwacji Ziemi. Satelita jest demonstratorem technologii i jest formatu CubeSat 16U. Satelita został umieszczony na orbicie o wysokości około 1200 km.

Był to dziewiąty start rakiety Electron i ósmy udany. Do końca roku firma RocketLab zamierza przeprowadzić jeszcze kilka startów rakiety Electron.

(PFA)
https://kosmonauta.net/2019/10/rakieta-electron-wynosi-palisade-demo-1/

Rocket Lab launches Astro Digital satellite
by Jeff Foust — October 17, 2019


A Rocket Lab Electron rocket lifts off Oct. 16 from the company's New Zealand launch site carrying a single satellite for Astro Digital. Credit: Rocket Lab webcast

WASHINGTON — A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched a single cubesat for Astro Digital Oct. 16, placing the satellite into a much higher orbit than previous Electron launches.

The Electron lifted off from Rocket Lab’s launch site on New Zealand’s Mahia Peninsula at 9:22 p.m. Eastern, a launch delayed two days by poor weather at the launch site, and then pushed back nearly halfway into the three-hour window by gusty upper-level winds.

The single satellite on the rocket separated from the rocket’s Curie kick stage 71 minutes after liftoff, going into a polar orbit at an altitude of more than 1,000 kilometers. That altitude is more than twice as high as previous Electron launches.

Rocket Lab said the launch took advantage of upgrades to that Curie kick stage, including a switch to a bipropellant engine for higher performance. That kick stage is also the bus for its Photon smallsat service that the company announced earlier this year.

That satellite, Palisade, is a 16U cubesat built by Astro Digital that is intended to demonstrate a satellite platform known as Corvus. The California company, originally focused on developing its own satellites for Earth imaging applications, is now offering broader smallsat manufacturing and mission design services. Palisade will test satellite propulsion and “next-generation” communications systems, as well as third-party flight control software.

Rocket Lab adjusted its launch schedule to accommodate the Astro Digital spacecraft. Rocket Lab said that it launched Palisade on this mission after another, unidentified customer originally slated for this rocket requested a delay.

The company is touting that schedule flexibility, and ability to fly to specific orbits like the one Palisade was deployed in, as the benefits of dedicated launch. Rocket Lab and other small launch vehicle developers are facing new competition from larger launch vehicle providers offering enhanced rideshare services, such as SpaceX’s smallsat rideshare initiative announced in August.

“No longer do small satellite operators have to accept the limitations of flying as a secondary payload, nor do they have to wait endlessly on the manifest of unproven launch vehicles,” Peter Beck, chief executive of Rocket Lab, said in a post-launch statement. “Frequent, responsive, and reliable launch is the new norm for small satellites thanks to Electron.”

The launch was the ninth Electron mission to date and the fifth this year as Rocket Lab pushes to increase the frequency of launches. The company said its next launch, for an undisclosed customer, is scheduled for late November.

This launch was also the first under a new “launch operator” license issued by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, which licenses launches for American companies regardless of launch location. The five-year license, dated Oct. 9, allows Rocket Lab to carry out a series of missions without the need to obtain a separate launch license for each one, provided the launch fits within parameters outlined in the license such as launch site and azimuth.

That new license offers a “streamlined path to orbit for our customers,” the company said in an Oct. 10 statement. “Efficient licensing supports frequent launch opportunities and truly responsive space access, and we’re thrilled to be delivering this for small sats.”
https://spacenews.com/rocket-lab-launches-astro-digital-satellite/

Rocket Lab delivers on dedicated launch for Astro Digital
October 17, 2019 Stephen Clark


In this view from the Electron rocket’s second stage, Rocket Lab’s Curie kick stage with the Palisade satellite is seen backdropped by the Earth around 10 minutes after liftoff. Credit: Rocket Lab

(...) The Electron rocket that launched Wednesday, known as “Flight 9,” was originally assigned to ferry a different payload into orbit, Beck said in a recent interview. Rocket Lab did not identify the satellite that was replaced by Astro Digital’s Palisade spacecraft. (...)

Rocket Lab aims to debut an upgraded Electron first stage on the company’s next mission, set for late November.

The first stage on the next Electron rocket, designated Flight 10, will feature several changes to help Rocket Lab prepare for an eventual attempt to recover the booster with a helicopter on a future flight. Rocket Lab announced in August plans to retrieve and reuse Electron first stages, primarily to achieve a planned cadence of one launch per week.

Rocket Lab determined production bottlenecks were a major factor inhibiting such a rapid launch rate. Reusing rockets could ease the burden on Rocket Lab’s factories in New Zealand and California, the company says. (...)

The next Electron launch will not carry a decelerator or a parachute. Those systems will be installed on later rockets to enable a recovery of the booster first from the ocean, then via helicopter, Beck said. (...)

The Palisade spacecraft launched Wednesday — about the size of a small suitcase — is designed for a technology demonstration mission, according to Astro Digital, a company based in Silicon Valley. It carries an on-board propulsion system, an Astro Digital-developed communications system, and software developed by Advanced Solutions Inc., a Colorado company.

“Our team built this satellite in five months, including the complex RF (communications) payload, something we are very proud of,” said Chris Biddy, co-founder and CEO of Astro Digital.

The company did not provide details on the type of communications technology it will test on the Palisade satellite, or the services the payload could provide to customers. (...)
https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/10/17/rocket-lab-delivers-on-dedicated-launch-for-astro-digital/

https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/10/15/rocket-lab-preps-for-commercial-satellite-launch/

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2019/10/rocket-lab-electron-flight-9-new-pad-continues/

https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/palisade.htm
« Ostatnia zmiana: Październik 20, 2019, 17:16 wysłana przez Orionid »

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« Odpowiedź #18 dnia: Październik 19, 2019, 00:22 »
Czwarty satelita szybkiej łączności
  17.10. o 15:21:04,363 z Xichang wystrzelona została RN CZ-3B/G2, która wyniosła na orbitę satelitę telekomunikacyjnego
Tongxin Jishu-4 (TJSW-4).
http://lk.astronautilus.pl/n191016.htm#02

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PFPxxJJosQk" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PFPxxJJosQk</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PFPxxJJosQk

China launches new communication technology experiment satellite
Source: Xinhua| 2019-10-18 00:25:51|Editor: Wang Yamei


A new communication technology experiment satellite is launched by a Long March-3B carrier rocket at the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in Xichang, southwest China's Sichuan Province, Oct. 17, 2019. The satellite will be mainly used for multi-band and high-speed communication technology experiments. (Photo by Guo Wenbin/Xinhua)

XICHANG, Oct. 17 (Xinhua) -- China sent a new communication technology experiment satellite into planned orbit from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in southwest China's Sichuan Province late Thursday.

The satellite, launched by a Long March-3B carrier rocket at 23:21 (Beijing Time), will be mainly used for multi-band and high-speed communication technology experiments.

The satellite and the carrier rocket were respectively developed by the China Academy of Space Technology and the China Academy of Launch Vehicle Technology under the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation.

Thursday's launch was the 315th mission of the Long March rocket series.
http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-10/18/c_138480279.htm

China launches mysterious geostationary satellite
October 18, 2019 Stephen Clark


A Long March 3B rocket lifted off from the Xichang space center at 1521 GMT (11:21 a.m. EDT) Thursday. Credit: CCTV

China successfully launched a satellite toward geostationary orbit Thursday aboard a Long March 3B rocket, but the spacecraft’s purpose remained a mystery.

The TJS 4 satellite lifted off from the Xichang space center in southwestern China’s Sichuan province at 1521 GMT (11:21 a.m. EDT; 11:21 p.m. Beijing time) Thursday. A Long March 3B rocket — China’s workhorse launcher for geostationary satellites — carried the TJS 4 spacecraft into space after flying east from the hilly Xichang spaceport.

The three-stage, 184-foot-tall (55-meter) Long March 3B rocket, boosted by four strap-on engines, released the TJS 4 satellite into an elliptical transfer orbit ranging in altitude between 124 miles (200 kilometers) and 22,255 miles (35,817 kilometers), according to U.S. military tracking data.

The spacecraft was tracked in an orbit inclined 27 degrees to the equator.

The China Academy of Launch Vehicle Technology, or CALT, announced the mission was successful.

TJS 4 is likely heading for a position in geostationary orbit more than 22,000 miles (nearly 36,000 kilometers) over the equator. The satellite will use on-board propulsion to circularize its orbit in the coming weeks, and lower its orbital inclination over the equator.

Statements released by CALT, a government-owned rocket manufacturer, and Chinese state media claimed the TJS 4 satellite will test communications technologies in space.

China has launched three previous satellites in the TJS series in 2015, 2017 and 2018. The previously-launched satellites were also described by Chinese media as communications technology demonstration payloads, but independent analysts and satellite trackers believe they were likely built for military missions.

The new TJS 4 spacecraft may have an intelligence-gathering mission collecting information from radio or electronic signals. Jonathan McDowell, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics who tracks global space activity, tweeted that he supports such a theory.

Some analysts believe the second TJS satellite may be an early warning station designed to detect missile launches.

The TJS 3 satellite launched in December 2018 released a smaller spacecraft after reaching orbit, but China has not acknowledged it, and the satellite’s purpose remains a mystery.
https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/10/18/china-launches-mysterious-geostationary-satellite/

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2019/10/long-march-3b-launches-tjsw-4/

https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/tjs-4.htm
« Ostatnia zmiana: Październik 19, 2019, 21:37 wysłana przez Orionid »

Polskie Forum Astronautyczne

Odp: Starty rakiet (IV kwartał 2019 roku)
« Odpowiedź #18 dnia: Październik 19, 2019, 00:22 »

Offline pogrzex

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Odp: Starty rakiet (IV kwartał 2019 roku)
« Odpowiedź #19 dnia: Październik 21, 2019, 14:50 »
To kiedy te kolejne Starlinki polecą? I czy będą widoczne przeloty?
'pierd.... Aphopis czy inny dziad i wała bedzieta mieli ze swoich grubych portfeli'

Offline astropl

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Odp: Starty rakiet (IV kwartał 2019 roku)
« Odpowiedź #20 dnia: Październik 21, 2019, 15:06 »
To kiedy te kolejne Starlinki polecą? I czy będą widoczne przeloty?

Najdokładniejsza odpowiedź brzmi tak: w najbliższym czasie :P
Waldemar Zwierzchlejski
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Offline mss

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Odp: Starty rakiet (IV kwartał 2019 roku)
« Odpowiedź #21 dnia: Październik 23, 2019, 20:19 »
GRUDZIEŃ 2019

01    11:29             Bajkonur 31/6     Sojuz-2.1a           Progress MS-13
04    17:48             KSC 39A           Falcon-9             Dragon-19
« Ostatnia zmiana: Październik 23, 2019, 21:50 wysłana przez mss »
Intel Core i5-2320 3GHz/8GB RAM/AMD Radeon HD 7700 Series/HD 1 TB/Sony DVD ROM...

Offline ah

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Odp: Starty rakiet (IV kwartał 2019 roku)
« Odpowiedź #22 dnia: Październik 28, 2019, 13:36 »

PAŹDZIERNIK 2019
...
??    ??:??             Jiuquan           KZ-1A                Jilin-1 Gaofen-02A
??    ??:??             Plesieck 43/4     Sojuz-2.1a/Fregat    Kosmos (Nejtron)
??    ??:??             Jiuquan           KZ-1A                ?
...


Start KZ-1A z Jilin-1 GF-02A ma się odbyć 29.10 3:34-3:38 UTC
https://twitter.com/LaunchStuff/status/1188039051837882369

Wg. https://mp.weixin.qq.com/s/5oimuH0TB1sgagUGiK11nw tym razem start ma być transmitowany.
Link do streamu:
  :)

« Ostatnia zmiana: Październik 28, 2019, 13:49 wysłana przez ah »

Offline astropl

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Odp: Starty rakiet (IV kwartał 2019 roku)
« Odpowiedź #23 dnia: Październik 31, 2019, 07:10 »

PAŹDZIERNIK 2019

04    18:51             Taiyuan 9         CZ-3C                Gaofen-10[R]
09    10:17:56          Bajkonur 200/39   Proton-M/Briz-M      Eutelsat 5 West B, MEV-1
11    01:30-03:00       Canaveral 13/31   L-1011/Pegasus-XL    ICON
17    01:22             Onenui 1          Electron/Curie       Palisade Demo-1
17    15:21:04          Xichang           CZ-3B/G2             TJ-4
__________________________________________________________________________________________

LISTOPAD 2019

0?   ~03:40             Jiuquan           KZ-1A                Jilin-1 Gaofen-02A
02    13:59             Wallops 0A        Antares-230          Cygnus-12
04    09:15             Jiuquan           KZ-1A                KL-Alpha A, B
05/07 ??:??             Xichang           CZ-3B/G2             Beidou-IGSO-3
1?    ??:??             Canaveral 40      Falcon-9             Starlink v1.0 x 60
19    ??:??             Bajkonur 31/6     Sojuz-2.16/Fregat-M  OneWeb x 34
20    ??:??             Sriharikota S     PSLV                 Cartosat-3,Meshbed, Flock x 12
22    ??:??             Kourou 3          Ariane-5ECA          Inmarsat 5 F5, TIBA-2
24   ~01:00             Xichang           CZ-3B/YZ-1           Beidou-3 M19, M20
29    ??:??             Plesieck 133/3    Rokot/Briz-KM        Goniec-M 23, 25, 26, BLITS-M
??    ??:??             Plesieck 43/4     Sojuz-2.1a/Fregat    Kosmos (Nejtron)
??    ??:??             Onenui 1          Electron/Curie       ATL-1, Discovery, FossaSat-1, NOOR-1A,
                                                               NOOR-1B, SMOG-P, TRSI Sat
??    ??:??             Jiuquan 43/94     CZ-2D                Gaofen-7
??    ??:??             Mojave 12/30      B-747/LauncherOne    MiniCarb, PAN A, PAN B, STP-27VP (x 8?)
??    ??:??             Canaveral 40      Falcon-9             Starlink v1.0 x 60
??    ??:??             Canaveral 40      Falcon-9             Starlink v1.0 x 60

GRUDZIEŃ 2019

01    11:29             Bajkonur 31/6     Sojuz-2.1a           Progress MS-13
02    ??:??             Plesieck 43/3     Sojuz-2.1b/Fregat-M  Kosmos (Uragan-M)
04    17:48             KSC 39A           Falcon-9             Dragon-19
01-07 ??:??             Jiuquan 43/94     CZ-2D                ETRSS-1
0?    ??:??             Sriharikota F     PSLV-CA              RISAT-2BR1, iQPS SAR, Spire-2 x 4
16    00:10-01:38       KSC 39A           Falcon-9             Kacific-1
17   ~12:45             Canaveral 41      Atlas-5/422          Starliner Boe-OFT
20-31 ??:??             Wenchang 101      CZ-5                 Shijian-20
3D    ??:??             Sriharikota S     PSLV-CA              RISAT-2BR2, Kleos x 4, Lemur x ?
??    ??:??             Plesieck 43/4     Sojuz-2.1w/Wołga     ?
??    ??:??             Onenui 1          Electron/Curie       MCNAIR
Waldemar Zwierzchlejski
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Offline kanarkusmaximus

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Odp: Starty rakiet (IV kwartał 2019 roku)
« Odpowiedź #24 dnia: Październik 31, 2019, 11:40 »
Strasznie nudny miesiąc za nami - tylko 5 startów!

Online Orionid

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Odp: Starty rakiet (IV kwartał 2019 roku)
« Odpowiedź #25 dnia: Październik 31, 2019, 21:53 »
Starty kosmiczne w 2019 (1)

Starty wg miesięcy:

I   6+1   (Chiny 2, SpaceX 1, ULA 1, Indie 1, Japonia 1, Iran 1)
II  4+1  ( SpaceX 1, Rosja 1+1 z Kourou, Europa 1, Iran 1)   
III 7+ 1  (Chiny 2+1 , SpaceX 1, ULA 1, Rocket Lab 1, Rosja 1, Europa 1)
IV 7    (Chiny 2 , SpaceX 1, NG 1, Rosja 1+1 Kourou, Indie 1)
V  7+ 1   (Chiny 1+1 , SpaceX 2, Rocket Lab 1, Rosja 2, Indie 1)
VI 6  (Chiny 2, SpaceX 2, Rocket Lab 1, Europa 1)
VII 10+1   (Chiny 2, SpaceX 1, Rosja 6, Europa 1, Indie 1)
VIII 11+1 (wybuch na wyrzutni)   (Chiny 3, SpaceX 1, ULA 2, Rocket Lab 1, Rosja 3, Europa 1, Iran 1)
IX 7  (Chiny 4, Rosja 2, Japonia 1)
X 5 (70+5+ 1) (Chiny 2, NG 1, Rocket Lab 1, Rosja 1)


   W skrócie:

Chiny                                             20 + 2                                                   
USA                                               16 (SpaceX 10, ULA 4, NG 2)                                                                 
Nowa Zelandia (Rocket Lab)               5           
Rosja                                             17+2 z Kourou                                                   
Europa (bez europejskich Sojuzów)     4 + 1           
Japonia                                          2                                                 
Indie                                              4       
Iran                                                2 + 1 (wybuch na wyrzutni)                                                                                 

Chiny

10.01.     CZ-3B/G2      Xichang LC2
             Zhongxing-2D
21.01.     CZ-11        Jiuquan
             Jilin Lincao-1
             Jilin Lincao-2
             Lingque-1A
             Xiaoxiang-1 03
09.03.     CZ-3B/G2      Xichang LC3
             Zhongxing-6C
27.03.     OS-M1      Jiuquan
             Lingque 1B

31.03.     CZ-3B/G2      Xichang
             Tianlian-2 01
20.04.     CZ-3B/G2      Xichang LC3
             Beidou-3 IGSO1 (4600 kg)
29.04.     CZ-4B      Taiyuan LC9
             Tianhui 2-01A (TH 2-01A)
             Tianhui 2-01B (TH 2-01B)
17.05.     CZ-3C      Xichang LC3
             Beidou-2 G8
22.05.    CZ-4C      Taiyuan LC9
             Yaogan-33

05.06.     CZ-11 WEY      barka, Morze Żółte
             Jilin-1 HR 03A (42 kg)
             Bufeng-1A
             Bufeng-1B
             Xiaoxiang-1-04
             Tianqi 3
             Tianxiang
             Tianxiang
24.06.     CZ-3B      Xichang LC3
             Beidou-3 IGSO-2 (4200 kg)
25.07.    SQX-1      Jiuquan
              CAS 7B (BP 1B, BO 102, BIT Progress-OSCAR 102) (3 kg)
              Hangtian KKG Fazhang sat
              (Hyperbola Stage 4 payloads)
26.07.     CZ-2C      Xichang
               Yaogan-30 Group 05 01
               Yaogan-30 Group 05 02
               Yaogan-30 Group 05 03
17.08.      Jielong-1      Jiuquan
               Tianqi-2 (8 kg ?)
               Qian Sheng 1-01 (65 kg)
               Xingshidai-5 (10 kg)
19.08.     CZ-3B/G2       Xichang LC2
              Zhongxing-18
30.08.     KZ-1A      Jiuquan
              KX-09
              Xiaoxiang-1-07
12.09.     CZ-4B     Taiyuan LC9
              Ziyuan-1 02D
              Jingshi-1 (16 kg)
              Jinniuzuo-1
19.09.     CZ-11      Jiuquan 43/95
               OHS-3
               OHS-3A
               OHS-3B
               OHS-3C
               OVS-3D (90 kg)
22.09.     CZ-3B/YZ-1      Xichang LC2
               Beidou-3 M23 (1014 kg ?)
               Beidou-3 M24 (1014 kg ?)
25.09.     CZ-2D      Jiuquan LC43/94
              Yunhai-1-02
04.10.     CZ-4C      Taiyuan LC9
              Gaofen-10[R]
17.10.     CZ-3B/G2      Xichang LC3
              TJSW-4


USA

SpaceX

11.01.     Falcon-9R      Vandenberg SLC-4E
             Iridium-NEXT 66 (860 kg)
             Iridium-NEXT 67 (860 kg)
             Iridium-NEXT 68 (860 kg)
             Iridium-NEXT 69 (860 kg)
             Iridium-NEXT 70 (860 kg)
             Iridium-NEXT 71 (860 kg)
             Iridium-NEXT 72 (860 kg)
             Iridium-NEXT 73 (860 kg)
             Iridium-NEXT 74 (860 kg)
             Iridium-NEXT 75 (860 kg)
22.02.     Falcon-9R      Canaveral SLC-40
             PSN-6 (4735 kg)
             Beresheet (582 kg)
             S5 (60 kg)
02.03.     Falcon-9R      KSC LC-39A
             Dragon 2 DM-1 (12055 kg)
11.04.     Falcon Heavy      KSC LC-39A
              Arabsat-6A (6465 kg; 3520 kg (bez paliwa)
04.05.     Falcon-9R      Canaveral SLC-40
              Dragon SpX-17
              Red-Eye↑ (~100 kg)
              OCO 3⇑
              STP-H6⇑
24.05.     Falcon-9R      Canaveral SLC-40
              Starlink 1 (227 kg)
              Starlink 2 (227 kg)
              Starlink 3 (227 kg)
              Starlink 4 (227 kg)
              Starlink 5 (227 kg)
              Starlink 6 (227 kg)
              Starlink 7 (227 kg)
              Starlink 8 (227 kg)
              Starlink 9 (227 kg)
              Starlink 10 (227 kg)
              Starlink 11 (227 kg)
              Starlink 12 (227 kg)
              Starlink 13 (227 kg)
              Starlink 14 (227 kg)
              Starlink 15 (227 kg)
              Starlink 16 (227 kg)
              Starlink 17 (227 kg)
              Starlink 18 (227 kg)
              Starlink 19 (227 kg)
              Starlink 20 (227 kg)
              Starlink 21 (227 kg)
              Starlink 22 (227 kg)
              Starlink 23 (227 kg)
              Starlink 24 (227 kg)
              Starlink 25 (227 kg)
              Starlink 26 (227 kg)
              Starlink 27 (227 kg)
              Starlink 28 (227 kg)
              Starlink 29 (227 kg)
              Starlink 30 (227 kg)
              Starlink 31 (227 kg)
              Starlink 32 (227 kg)
              Starlink 33 (227 kg)
              Starlink 34 (227 kg)
              Starlink 35 (227 kg)
              Starlink 36 (227 kg)
              Starlink 37 (227 kg)
              Starlink 38 (227 kg)
              Starlink 39 (227 kg)
              Starlink 40 (227 kg)
              Starlink 41 (227 kg)
              Starlink 42 (227 kg)
              Starlink 43 (227 kg)
              Starlink 44 (227 kg)
              Starlink 45 (227 kg)
              Starlink 46 (227 kg)
              Starlink 47 (227 kg)
              Starlink 48 (227 kg)
              Starlink 49 (227 kg)
              Starlink 50 (227 kg)
              Starlink 51 (227 kg)
              Starlink 52 (227 kg)
              Starlink 53 (227 kg)
              Starlink 54 (227 kg)
              Starlink 55 (227 kg)
              Starlink 56 (227 kg)
              Starlink 57 (227 kg)
              Starlink 58 (227 kg)
              Starlink 59 (227 kg)
              Starlink 60 (227 kg)
12.06.     Falcon-9R      Vandenberg SLC-4E
              Radarsat-C1 (1430 kg)
              Radarsat-C2 (1430 kg)
              Radarsat-C3 (1430 kg)
25.06.     Falcon Heavy      KSC LC-39A
              DSX (~600 kg)
              FORMOSAT 7A (278 kg)
              FORMOSAT 7B (278 kg)
              FORMOSAT 7C (278 kg)
              FORMOSAT 7D (278 kg)
              FORMOSAT 7E (278 kg)
              FORMOSAT 7F (278 kg)
              GPIM (~ 180 kg)
              OTB 1 (138 kg)
              NPSat 1 (86 kg)
              Oculus-ASR (70 kg)
              Prox 1 (71 kg)
              LightSail B (5 kg)
              E-TBEx A (4 kg)
              E-TBEx B (4 kg)
              PSat 2 (2 kg)
              TEPCE 1 (1.5 kg)
              TEPCE 2 (1.5 kg)
              BRICSat 2 (1 kg)
              FalconSat 7 (5 kg
              ARMADILLO (4 kg)
              CP 9 (LEO) (2 kg)
              StangSat (1 kg)
              Prometheus-2 5 ? (2 kg)
25.07.    Falcon-9R      Canaveral SLC-40
              Dragon CRS-18 (SpX 18, Dragon C108-F3)
              IDA 3 ⇑ (526 kg)
              RFTSat 1 ↑
              MakerSat 1 ↑ (1 kg)
              NARSScube 2 ↑ (1 kg)
              ? ↑
06.08.    Falcon-9      Canaveral SLC-40
              Amos-17 (6500 kg)


ULA

19.01.     Delta-4H      Vandenberg SLC-6
               USA-290 (13500 kg - 17000 kg)
16.03.     Delta-4M+(5,4)      Canaveral SLC-37B
              WGS-10 (5987 kg)
08.08.    Atlas-5/551      Canaveral SLC-41
             AEHF-5 (USA-292) (6168 kg)
             TDO
22.08.    Delta-4M+(4,2)      Canaveral SLC-37B
             GPS III SV02 (4400 kg (#1))


Northrop Grumman

17.04.     Antares-230      Wallops LP-0A
             Cygnus NG-11 (SS Roger Chaffee)
             VCC A (1 kg) ↑
             VCC B (1 kg) ↑
             VCC C (1 kg) ↑
             Bird JPN (1 kg) ↑
             Bird LKA (1 kg) ↑
             Bird NPL (1 kg) ↑
             IOD-GEMS (4 kg) ↑
             SpooQy 1 ↑
             EntrySat (4 kg) ↑
             Światowid (2 kg) ↑
             KrakSat (1 kg) ↑
             AeroCube 10A
             AeroCube 10B
             SASSI2 (4 kg)
             Seeker
             ThinSat 1A (1.95 kg)
             ThinSat 1B (1.09 kg)
             ThinSat 1C (2.11 kg)
             ThinSat 1D (2.20 kg)
             ThinSat 1E (2.16 kg)
             ThinSat 1F (2.11 kg)
             ThinSat 1G (1.10 kg)
             ThinSat 1H (2.11 kg)
             ThinSat 1I (2.15 kg)
             ThinSat 1J (2.20 kg)
             ThinSat 1K (1.10 kg)
             ThinSat 1L (2.14 kg)
11.10.    L-1011/Pegasus-XL      Canaveral 13/31
             ICON (288 kg)

Nowa Zelandia
Rocket Lab (amerykańska spółka z nowozelandzką spółką zależną)

28.03.     Electron/Curie      Onenui LC1
              R3D2 (150 kg)
05.05.     Electron/Curie      Onenui LC1
              SPARC-1
              Falcon ODE (1 kg)
              Harbinger (150 kg)
29.06.      Electron      Onenui LC-1
              BlackSky Global 3 (56 kg)
              Prometheus 2.6 ? (2 kg)
              Prometheus 2.7 ? (2 kg)
              ACRUX 1 (1 kg)
              SpaceBEE 8 (0.4 kg)
              SpaceBEE 9 (0.7 kg)
              ?
19.08.     Electron/Curie      Onenui LC1
              BlackSky Global 4 (56 kg)
              BRO 1 (6 kg)
              AFSPC 1
              AFSPC 2
17.10.     Electron      Onenui LC1
              Palisade Demo-1

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Odp: Starty rakiet (IV kwartał 2019 roku)
« Odpowiedź #26 dnia: Październik 31, 2019, 21:53 »
Starty kosmiczne w 2019 (2)

Rosja

21.02.     Sojuz-2.1b/Fregat-M      Bajkonur 31/PU-6
               EgyptSat-A (~1000 kg)
14.03.     Sojuz-FG      Bajkonur 1/PU-5
              Sojuz MS-12
04.04.     Sojuz-2.1a      Bajkonur 31/PU-6     
             Progress MS-11
27.05.     Sojuz-2.1b/Fregat-M      Plesieck 43/PU-4
             Kosmos 2534 (1415 kg)
30.05.     Proton-M/Briz-M      Bajkonur 200/PU-39
               Jamał-601 (5700 kg)
05.07.     Sojuz-2.1b/Fregat      Wostocznyj 1S
               Meteor-M 2-2 (2750 kg)
               ICEYE X4
               ICEYE X5
               CarboNIX (~30 kg)
               DoT 1 (20 kg)
               El Camino Real (Momentus X1)
               NSLSat 1
               AmGU 1 (AmurSat)
               Lemur-2 100 (Lemur-2 Wanli) (4 kg)
               Lemur-2 101 (Lemur-2 LillyJo) (4 kg)
               Lemur-2 102 (Lemur-2 DustInTheWind) (4 kg)
               Lemur-2 103 (Lemur-2 EJatta) (4 kg)
               Lemur-2 104 (Lemur-2 Morag) (4 kg)
               Lemur-2 105 (Lemur-2 GregRobinson) (4 kg)
               Lemur-2 106 (Lemur-2 Yndrd) (4 kg)
               Lemur-2 107 (Lemur-2 Alex-Maddy) (4 kg)
               EXOCONNECT (D-Star One EXOCONNECT) (4 kg)
               JAISAT 1
               LightSat (D-Star One LightSat) (4 kg)
               SEAM 2.0 (4 kg)
               Sokrat
               SONATE
               UTE-Ecuador
               VDNH-80 (VDNKh-80)
               Lucky-7 (1 kg)
               MOVE 2b (1 kg)
               MTCube (ROBUSTA 1C) (1 kg)
               TTÜ101 (TTÜSat, MektorySAT 1, Koit) (1 kg)
               BeeSat 9 (1 kg)
               BeeSat 10 (1 kg)
               BeeSat 11 (1 kg)
               BeeSat 12 (1 kg)
               BeeSat 13 (1 kg)
10.07.     Sojuz-2.1w/Wołga      Plesieck 43/PU-4
               Kosmos 2535
               Kosmos 2536
               Kosmos 2537
               Kosmos 2538
13.07.     Proton-M/DM-03       Bajkonur 81/PU-24
               Spektr-RG (2647 kg - przy starcie, 2267 kg bez paliwa)   
20.07.     Sojuz-FG      Bajkonur1/PU-5
               Sojuz MS-13
30.07.     Soyuz-2-1a Fregat-M      Plesieck 43/PU-4     
               Meridian 8 (~2100 kg)
31.07.     Sojuz-2.1a       Bajkonur 31/PU-6
               Progress MS-12   
05.08.     Proton-M/Briz-M      Bajkonur 81/PU-24
               Kosmos 2539 (Blagovest 14L)
22.08.     Sojuz-2.1a      Bajkonur 31/PU-6
              Sojuz MS-14
30.08.      Rokot/Briz-KM      Plesieck 133/PU-3
               Kosmos 2540 (~1400 kg)
25.09.    Sojuz-FG      Bajkonur 1/PU-5
             Sojuz MS-15
26.09.    Sojuz-2.1b/Fregat      Plesieck 43/PU-4
             Kosmos 2541 (Tundra)
09.10.    Proton-M/Briz-M      Bajkonur 200/PU-39
             Eutelsat 5 West B (~3000 kg)
             MEV-1 (2326 kg)
               

Rosja  (Arianespace)

27.02.    Sojuz-ST-B/Fregat-M    Kourou ELS
             OneWeb 0006 (145 kg)
             OneWeb 0007 (145 kg)
             OneWeb 0008 (145 kg)
             OneWeb 0009 (145 kg)
             OneWeb 0010 (145 kg)
             OneWeb 0011 (145 kg)
             OneWeb Mass Models (4) przymocowane do dozownika i górnego stopnia Fregat-M jako balast
04.04.    Sojuz-STB/Fregat-MT       Kourou ELS 700 kg
             O3b (FM-17) (700 kg)
             O3b (FM-18) (700 kg)
             O3b (FM-19) (700 kg)
             O3b (FM-20) (700 kg)


Europa

05.02.     Ariane-5ECA      Kourou ELA-3
             HS4-SGS1 (6495 kg; 3950 kg (bez paliwa) )
             GSat-31 (2536 kg)
22.03.     Vega      Kourou ZLV
             PRISMA (879 kg)
20.06.     Ariane-5ECA       Kourou ELA-3     
             AT&T T-16 (6350 kg)
             Eutelsat 7C (3400 kg)
11.07.     Vega      Kourou ZLV
               Falcon Eye 1 (1197 kg)
06.08.     Ariane-5ECA      Kourou ELA-3 
              Intelsat 39 (6600 kg)
              EDRS-C (3186 kg)


Japonia

18.01.     Epsilon      Kagoshima LP-M
             RAPIS-1 (~200 kg)
             RISESAT (~50 kg)
             ALE-1 (~68 kg)
             MicroDragon (50 kg)
             OrigamiSat-1 (4 kg)
             Aoba (2 kg)
             NEXUS (1 kg)
24.09.    H2-B      Tanegashima Y/LP-2
             HTV-8 (Kounotori-8)


Indie

24.01.     PSLV-DL      Sriharikota FLP
             Microsat-R (740 kg)
             Kalamsat v2 (?, 1.26 kg (payload only))
01.04.     PSLV-QL      Sriharikota SLP
             EMISAT (436 kg)
             Flock-4a 1 (Dove 2218) (5 kg)
             Flock-4a 2 (Dove 2201) (5 kg)
             Flock-4a 3 (Dove 2206) (5 kg)
             Flock-4a 4 (Dove 2220) (5 kg)
             Flock-4a 5 (Dove 2227) (5 kg)
             Flock-4a 6 (Dove 220B) (5 kg)
             Flock-4a 7 (Dove 222D) (5 kg)
             Flock-4a 8 (Dove 2213) (5 kg)
             Flock-4a 9 (Dove 2224) (5 kg)
             Flock-4a 10 (Dove 2205) (5 kg)
             Flock-4a 11 (Dove 2223) (5 kg)
             Flock-4a 12 (Dove 2209) (5 kg)
             Flock-4a 13 (Dove 220C) (5 kg)
             Flock-4a 14 (Dove 222C) (5 kg)
             Flock-4a 15 (Dove 2207) (5 kg)
             Flock-4a 16 (Dove 222B) (5 kg)
             Flock-4a 17 (Dove 2212) (5 kg)
             Flock-4a 18 (Dove 2215) (5 kg)
             Flock-4a 19 (Dove 2235) (5 kg)
             Flock-4a 20 (Dove 2232) (5 kg)
             Lemur-2 96 (4 kg)
             Lemur-2 97 (4 kg)
             Lemur-2 98 (4 kg)
             Lemur-2 99 (4 kg)
             BlueWalker 1 (BW 1)
             M6P
             Astrocast 0.2 (4 kg)
             AISTECHSAT 3 (Danu Pathfinder)
             AIS/APRS/ARIS
22.05.     PSLV-CA      Sriharikota FLP
             RISAT-2B (615 kg)
22.07.    GSLV Mk 3      Sriharikota SLP     
              Chandrayaan-2


Iran

15.01.    Simorgh      Semnan LC-2
             Payam-e Amirkabir
(90 kg)
05.02.     Safir-1B      Semnan LC-1
             Dousti 1
(52 kg)
29.08.    Safir-1B      Semnan LC-1
             Nahid-1
(50 kg) (wybuch na wyrzutni)


http://lk.astronautilus.pl/starty19.htm
http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_chr/lau2019.htm

2017
2018

Objaśnienia:
↑ - satelita umieszczony na orbicie z pokładu ISS lub rozmieszczony z innego statku
⇑- ładunek zainstalowany na zewnątrz ISS

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Odp: Starty rakiet (IV kwartał 2019 roku)
« Odpowiedź #27 dnia: Listopad 03, 2019, 07:14 »

PAŹDZIERNIK 2019

04    18:51             Taiyuan 9         CZ-3C                Gaofen-10[R]
09    10:17:56          Bajkonur 200/39   Proton-M/Briz-M      Eutelsat 5 West B, MEV-1
11    01:30-03:00       Canaveral 13/31   L-1011/Pegasus-XL    ICON
17    01:22             Onenui 1          Electron/Curie       Palisade Demo-1
17    15:21:04          Xichang           CZ-3B/G2             TJ-4

LISTOPAD 2019

02    13:59:46          Wallops 0A        Antares-230          Cygnus-12
03    03:22:39          Taiyuan 9         CZ-4B                Gaofen-7, Jingzhi 1, Jifeng,
                                                               Sudan Scientific Experimental Satellite 1
__________________________________________________________________________________________
04    09:15             Jiuquan           KZ-1A                KL-Alpha A, B
05/07 ??:??             Xichang           CZ-3B/G2             Beidou-IGSO-3
0?   ~03:40             Jiuquan           KZ-1A                Jilin-1 Gaofen-02A
11   ~15:00             Canaveral 40      Falcon-9             Starlink v1.0 x 60
19    ??:??             Bajkonur 31/6     Sojuz-2.1b/Fregat-M  OneWeb x 34
20    ??:??             Sriharikota S     PSLV                 Cartosat-3,Meshbed, Flock x 12
22    21:08             Kourou 3          Ariane-5ECA          Inmarsat 5 F5, TIBA-2
24   ~01:00             Xichang           CZ-3B/YZ-1           Beidou-3 M19, M20
??    ??:??             Plesieck 43/4     Sojuz-2.1a/Fregat    Kosmos (Nejtron)
??    ??:??             Onenui 1          Electron/Curie       ATL-1, Discovery, FossaSat-1, NOOR-1A,
                                                               NOOR-1B, SMOG-P, TRSI Sat
??    ??:??             Mojave 12/30      B-747/LauncherOne    MiniCarb, PAN A, PAN B, STP-27VP (x 8?)
??    ??:??             Canaveral 40      Falcon-9             Starlink v1.0 x 60
??    ??:??             Canaveral 40      Falcon-9             Starlink v1.0 x 60

GRUDZIEŃ 2019

01    11:29             Bajkonur 31/6     Sojuz-2.1a           Progress MS-13
02    ??:??             Plesieck 43/3     Sojuz-2.1b/Fregat-M  Kosmos (Uragan-M)
04    17:48             KSC 39A           Falcon-9             Dragon-19
01-07 ??:??             Jiuquan 43/94     CZ-2D                ETRSS-1
0?    ??:??             Sriharikota F     PSLV-CA              RISAT-2BR1, iQPS SAR, Spire-2 x 4
16    00:10-01:38       KSC 39A           Falcon-9             Kacific-1
17    08:54:20          Kourou ELS        Sojuz-STA/Fregat-M   CSG-1, CHEOPS, ANGELS, EyeSat, OPS-SAT,
                                                               Open Cosmos x 4, ELO
17   ~12:45             Canaveral 41      Atlas-5/422          Starliner Boe-OFT
20-31 ??:??             Wenchang 101      CZ-5                 Shijian-20
25    ??:??             Plesieck 133/3    Rokot/Briz-KM        Goniec-M 23, 25, 26, BLITS-M
3D    ??:??             Sriharikota S     PSLV-CA              RISAT-2BR2, Kleos x 4, Lemur x ?
??    ??:??             Plesieck 43/4     Sojuz-2.1w/Wołga     ?
??    ??:??             Onenui 1          Electron/Curie       MCNAIR
Waldemar Zwierzchlejski
http://lk.astronautilus.pl

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Odp: Starty rakiet (IV kwartał 2019 roku)
« Odpowiedź #28 dnia: Listopad 03, 2019, 12:47 »
Start z Taiyuan
  03.11. o 03:22:39 z Taiyuan wystrzelona została RN CZ-4B, która wyniosła na orbitę satelity Gaofen-7, Jingzhi 1
(Exquisite High-score Test Satellite), Sudan Scientific Experimental Satellite 1 i Jifeng (Xiaoxiang 1-08).
http://lk.astronautilus.pl/n191101.htm#03

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7EbkUoz_kA" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7EbkUoz_kA</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7EbkUoz_kA

China launches new Earth observation satellite


Gaofen-7 is launched on a Long March-4B rocket at 11:22 am (Beijing Time) from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center in North China's Shanxi province on Nov 3, 2019. [Photo/Xinhua]

TAIYUAN, Nov. 3 (Xinhua) -- China on Sunday launched a new Earth observation satellite, Gaofen-7, which will play an important role in land surveying and mapping, urban and rural construction and statistical investigation, according to the China National Space Administration (CNSA).

The Gaofen-7, launched on a Long March-4B rocket at 11:22 a.m. (Beijing Time) from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center in northern China's Shanxi Province, is China's first civil-use optical transmission three-dimensional surveying and mapping satellite that reaches the sub-meter level, CNSA said.

The satellite and carrier rocket were developed by the China Academy of Space Technology (CAST) and the Shanghai Academy of Spaceflight Technology under the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation.

The users of the Gaofen-7 satellite will be mainly from the Ministry of Natural Resources, the Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development and the National Bureau of Statistics.

Via the same carrier rocket, three other commercial and scientific experiment satellites including one developed for Sudan were also sent into space.

The development of the Gaofen-7 has achieved a breakthrough in sub-meter level 3D mapping camera technology, meeting the highest mapping accuracy requirement among the Gaofen series Earth observation satellites, CNSA said.

It can obtain high-resolution optical 3D observation data and high-precision laser altimetry data and can realize 1:10,000 scale satellite 3D mapping for civil use in China, according to CNSA.

The satellite can meet the needs of users in basic mapping, global geographic information, monitoring and evaluation in urban and rural construction, agricultural survey and statistics, etc.

Cao Haiyi, chief designer of Gaofen-7 from CAST, said the satellite also has excellent positioning accuracy. For instance, it is able to accurately locate the roads in the countryside.

The new satellite will work together with other Gaofen satellites to form an Earth observation system with high resolution and high positioning accuracy, which will help promote international sci-tech industrial cooperation through data sharing and support the Belt and Road initiative, said Wang Xiang, chief commander of the Gaofen-7 satellite project.

Since the Gaofen project began in 2010, China has had an increasingly clearer view of the planet. Launched in April 2013, Gaofen-1 can cover the globe in just four days.

Gaofen-2, sent into space in August 2014, is accurate to 0.8 meters in full color and can collect multispectral images of objects greater than 3.2 meters in length.

Gaofen-4, launched in late 2015, is China's first geosynchronous orbit high-definition optical imaging satellite.

Gaofen-3, launched in August 2016, is China's first synthetic aperture radar imaging satellite.

Gaofen-5, launched in May 2018, has the highest spectral resolution of China's remote sensing satellites.

Gaofen-6, launched in June 2018, has a similar function to that of Gaofen-1, but with better cameras, and its high-resolution images can cover a large area of the earth.

Data from the Gaofen series satellites have been widely used in more than 20 industries across China. The project has helped reduce China's dependence on foreign remote sensing satellite data.

The focus of the project will be shifted to application in the future. An advanced land, atmosphere and ocean observation system is expected to be completed in 2020 to provide services for modern agriculture, disaster prevention and mitigation, resources and environmental management and public security protection, said CNSA.
http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-11/03/c_138525473.htm
https://www.chinadaily.com.cn/a/201911/03/WS5dbe532ba310cf3e35575167.html

China tests grid fins with launch of Gaofen-7 imaging satellite
by Andrew Jones — November 4, 2019

(...)
Iodine propulsion, Sudan in orbit

Joining the main Gaofen-7 payload were two small satellites and a CubeSat. The Sudan Remote Sensing Satellite was developed by Shenzhen Aerospace Dongfanghong HIT Satellite Ltd. Huangpu-1, a technology demonstration satellite, was developed under the Shanghai Institute of Satellite Engineering.

The final passenger was developed by Spacety, a privately-owned Chinese satellite manufacturer based in Changsha. The 6U CubeSat is a technology test for multispectral imaging.

The Dianfeng spacecraft also carries a 0.4 kilogram laser communication payload from LaserFleet for technology verification tests. LaserFleet is a spin-off from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) with plans to build a low Earth orbit constellation providing broadband services that through laser communications.

The satellite includes an Iodine-based propulsion system developed and built by ThrustMe, a French company founded in 2017. The system a first-of-its-kind, non-pressurized, cold gas thruster fuelled by solid iodine, according to a ThrustMe press release. (...)
https://spacenews.com/china-tests-grid-fins-with-launch-of-gaofen-7-imaging-satellite/

Chinese mapping satellite launches on Long March 4B rocket
November 3, 2019 Stephen Clark


A ThrustMe engineer works with ground test equipment. Credit: ThrustMe

(...) The primary payload launched Sunday was Gaofen 7, the latest in a series civilian-operated Chinese Earth observation satellites. Gaofen 7 is China’s first civilian-use optical surveillance satellite capable of collecting three-dimensional images with better than one-meter (3.3-foot) resolution, according to the China National Space Administration.

Two other small satellites were aboard Sunday’s launch: Huangpu 1, a technology demonstration satellite for a planned constellation of low Earth orbit satellites, and the Sudan Scientific Experimental Satellite. (...)
https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/11/03/chinese-mapping-satellite-launches-on-long-march-4b-rocket/

Gaofen-7 https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/gf-7.htm
Jingzhi 1
Sudan SES-1
Jifeng
« Ostatnia zmiana: Listopad 04, 2019, 22:58 wysłana przez Orionid »

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Odp: Starty rakiet (IV kwartał 2019 roku)
« Odpowiedź #29 dnia: Listopad 04, 2019, 21:05 »

Polskie Forum Astronautyczne

Odp: Starty rakiet (IV kwartał 2019 roku)
« Odpowiedź #29 dnia: Listopad 04, 2019, 21:05 »