Autor Wątek: Falcon 9 | CRS-19 | 5.12.2019  (Przeczytany 4235 razy)

0 użytkowników i 1 Gość przegląda ten wątek.

Offline Limax7

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 1030
  • .: I love comets :.
    • adamhurcewicz.wordpress.com
Odp: Falcon 9 | CRS-19 | 5.12.2019
« Odpowiedź #30 dnia: Grudzień 05, 2019, 19:45 »
Hej a cóż to tam pomyka ? Od 5 min od startu  ;D ::)

http://youtu.be/-aoAGdYXp_4?t=19m55s
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aoAGdYXp_4" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aoAGdYXp_4</a>

« Ostatnia zmiana: Grudzień 05, 2019, 19:51 wysłana przez Limax7 »
Adam Hurcewicz
Uniwersał 150/900
Nikon D3200 + Nikkor AF-S 18-105mm + Sigma APO 70-300mm

Białystok, Polska
http://adamhurcewicz.wordpress.com

Offline artpoz

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 1426
Odp: Falcon 9 | CRS-19 | 5.12.2019
« Odpowiedź #31 dnia: Grudzień 05, 2019, 20:02 »
Garść statystyk dotyczących dzisiejszego startu:

76th launch of a Falcon 9 rocket since 2010
84th launch of Falcon rocket family since 2006
1st launch of Falcon 9 booster B1059
61st Falcon 9 launch from Cape Canaveral
46th Falcon 9 launch from pad 40
19th SpaceX CRS mission to the space station
21st flight of a Dragon spacecraft
8th time SpaceX has flown a reused Dragon capsule
10th Falcon 9 launch of 2019
12th launch by SpaceX in 2019
14th orbital launch based out of Cape Canaveral in 2019

Offline Limax7

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 1030
  • .: I love comets :.
    • adamhurcewicz.wordpress.com
Odp: Falcon 9 | CRS-19 | 5.12.2019
« Odpowiedź #32 dnia: Grudzień 05, 2019, 20:34 »
Hej a cóż to tam pomyka ? Od 5 min od startu  ;D ::)

http://youtu.be/-aoAGdYXp_4?t=19m55s
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aoAGdYXp_4" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aoAGdYXp_4</a>

Wygląda jak mysz w kosmosie  :D :D ;)
Adam Hurcewicz
Uniwersał 150/900
Nikon D3200 + Nikkor AF-S 18-105mm + Sigma APO 70-300mm

Białystok, Polska
http://adamhurcewicz.wordpress.com

Offline suchyy

  • Senior
  • ****
  • Wiadomości: 494
Odp: Falcon 9 | CRS-19 | 5.12.2019
« Odpowiedź #33 dnia: Grudzień 05, 2019, 20:46 »
Inspekcja Falcona przez kosmitów!  :P  ;D

Po 3-ciej minucie lotu, na lewym podglądzie z kamerki lądującego pierwszego członu widać fajnie w tle odrzucone pokrywy
« Ostatnia zmiana: Grudzień 05, 2019, 21:15 wysłana przez suchyy »
Pozdrawiam: Jurek (suchyy).

Polskie Forum Astronautyczne

Odp: Falcon 9 | CRS-19 | 5.12.2019
« Odpowiedź #33 dnia: Grudzień 05, 2019, 20:46 »

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 14418
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Falcon 9 | CRS-19 | 5.12.2019
« Odpowiedź #34 dnia: Grudzień 07, 2019, 07:19 »
Dragon zmierza do ISS
  05.12. o 17:29:24,521 z Cape Canaveral wystartowała RN Falcon-9. Wyniosła ona na orbitę statek transportowy Dragon
SpX-19 (CRS-19). Jego uchwycenie i przyłączenie do ISS wykonane zostało 08.12.2019 o 10:05/12:47.
http://lk.astronautilus.pl/n191201.htm#01

Udany początek misji CRS-19
BY KRZYSZTOF KANAWKA ON 6 GRUDNIA 2019


Początek misji CRS-19 / Credits - SpaceX

Piątego grudnia doszło do startu rakiety Falcon 9 z kapsułą Dragon. Celem tej misji o oznaczeniu CRS-19 jest Międzynarodowa Stacja Kosmiczna.

Start rakiety Falcon 9 nastąpił 5 grudnia 2019 o godzinie 18:29 CET z wyrzutni LC-40 na Florydzie. Na pokładzie rakiety Falcon 9 znalazła się bezzałogowa kapsuła Dragon. Celem tej misji zaopatrzeniowej jest Międzynarodowa Stacja Kosmiczna (ISS). Oznaczenie tej misji to CRS-19.

Lot rakiety Falcon 9 przebiegł bez problemów i kapsuła Dragon została wprowadzona na odpowiednią orbitę początkową. Stąd Dragon przez kolejne kilkadziesiąt godzin będzie “gonić” ISS. Dotarcie do Stacji planowane jest na 8 grudnia około południa (czasu CET).

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aoAGdYXp_4" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aoAGdYXp_4</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aoAGdYXp_4&feature=emb_title

Początek misji CRS-19 / Credits – SpaceX

Po wykonanej pracy pierwszy stopień rakiety Falcon 9 z powodzeniem wylądował na platformie morskiej.

Na pokładzie Dragona znalazł się duży zestaw eksperymentów naukowych – w tym małe zwięrzęta. NASA podsumowała część z tych eksperymentów na poniższym nagraniu. Ponadto, w sekcji nieciśnieniowej Dragona zainstalowano dwa ładunki o łącznej masie 924 kg – hiperspektralną kamerę HISUI oraz zestaw akumulatorów litowych.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mGwANxGbM64" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mGwANxGbM64</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mGwANxGbM64&feature=emb_title

Ładunek naukowy misji CRS-19 / Credits – NASA Johnson

Misja CRS-19 jest planowana na około 30 dni.

(PFA)
https://kosmonauta.net/2019/12/udany-poczatek-misji-crs-19/#prettyPhoto

Photos: Falcon 9 in the starting blocks for space station resupply run
December 4, 2019 Stephen Clark


Credit: Stephen Clark/Spaceflight Now
https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/12/04/photos-falcon-9-in-the-starting-blocks-for-space-station-resupply-run/

Dragon soars on research and resupply flight to International Space Station
December 5, 2019 Stephen Clark


SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket soared into space Thursday on a resupply flight to the International Space Station. Credit: Stephen Clark/Spaceflight Now

(...) Scientists loaded 40 genetically-engineered into the Dragon capsule to help gauge the effectiveness of an experimental drug to combat muscle and bone atrophy. There’s also an experiment sponsored by Anheuser-Busch to study the malting of barley in microgravity, which could lead to the brewing of beer in space, the company says.

A combustion experiment to be delivered to the station will guide research into the behavior of flames in confined spaces in microgravity. NASA and commercial teams have disclosed seven CubeSats stowed inside the Dragon spacecraft for deployment in orbit, including the first nanosatellite built in Mexico to fly to the space station.

And there are a few holiday treats in store for the space station’s six-person crew.

“As far as presents and so forth, I’m not sure I want to divulge anything, but I think I would tell you that Santa’s sleigh is certified for the vacuum of space,” joked Kenny Todd, manager of space station operations and integration at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

Crammed full of 5,769 pounds (2,617 kilograms) of equipment, the automated cargo freighter blasted off from pad 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 12:29:24 p.m. EST (1729:24 GMT) Thursday to kick off a three-day trek to the space station. (...)


A forward-facing video camera on-board the Falcon 9’s second stage showed the Dragon capsule separating from the rocket nearly 10 minutes after liftoff. Credit: SpaceX

(...) After releasing the Dragon spacecraft, the Falcon 9 rocket’s upper stage was expected to continue on an extended-duration coast lasting nearly six hours. SpaceX intended to collect thermal data and other information on the performance of the stage during several orbits of the Earth, before the Merlin engine reignites for a long disposal burn to drive the rocket body back into Earth’s atmosphere for a destructive re-entry over the far southern Indian Ocean.

SpaceX said the long-duration experiment is necessary to verify the upper stage’s readiness to support future missions that might require the rocket to coast in the extreme environment of space for up to six hours. Missions that require that capability include high-altitude orbital injections for U.S. military and National Reconnaissance Office satellites.

The extended flight of the upper stage was expected to take up some of the Falcon 9’s excess fuel capacity, leaving insufficient propellant in the first stage to allow the booster to return to a landing at Cape Canaveral. Instead, SpaceX landed the rocket at sea. (...)

Here is a break-down of the Dragon spacecraft’s 5,769-pound (2,617-kilogram) supply load. The figures below do not include the mass of cargo packaging, which is included in NASA’s overall payload mass:

Science Investigations: 2,154 pounds (977 kilograms)
Vehicle Hardware: 675 pounds (306 kilograms)
Crew Supplies: 564 pounds (256 kilograms)
Spacewalk Equipment: 141 pounds (65 kilograms)
Computer Resources: 33 pounds (15 kilograms)
Unpressurized Payloads: 2,037 pounds (924 kilograms)

Eight of the 40 mice launched toward the space station Thursday have been genetically-engineered to lack myostatin, a protein that acts to limit muscle growth in animals. The muscle-bound, myostatin-free mice — or “mighty mice” — are joined by four other groups of rodents, including groups that will be given an experimental drug in space to block myostatin activity and promote muscle growth.

All 40 mice will return to Earth alive on the Dragon capsule in early January. Scientists will administer the same myostatin protein blocker to some of the mice after they are back on the ground to assess how the drug affects their rate of recovery. (...)
https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/12/05/dragon-soars-on-research-and-resupply-flight-to-international-space-station/
https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/12/03/spacex-cargo-mission-combines-mighty-mice-fires-and-beer/
https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/12/03/long-duration-coast-experiment-on-tap-after-falcon-9-launch-wednesday/

SpaceX Sends 19th Resupply to Space Station, Makes 20th Rocket Landing
By Ben Evans, on December 5th, 2019

(...) However, the notion of “three-times-lucky” would not evade CRS-19 entirely. SpaceX announced that the mission would utilize the Dragon cargo ship serial numbered “C106”, which previously supported the CRS-4 flight in September 2014 and more recently CRS-11 in June 2017. When it completed its second voyage to the ISS, more than two years ago, it became the first Dragon to fly twice.

Sadly, C106 has since lost the opportunity to become first to fly three times. That crown went to its Dragon sister-ship C108, which flew CRS-6 in April 2015, CRS-13 in December 2017 and last July’s CRS-18. Yet with 64 days of flight time under its belt, C106 promises to another month to its in-space tally by the time it returns to Earth, sometime early in January. (...)

Housed in Dragon’s unpressurized “trunk” for CRS-19 is the 1,100-pound (500 kg) Hyperspectral Imager Suite (HISUI) instrument, provided by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). Shortly after the spacecraft arrives at the station, HISUI will be robotically extracted from the trunk and installed onto the Exposed Facility (EF) of Japan’s Kibo lab, where it will spend around three years observing the Home Planet at high resolution across all colors of the light spectrum, from visible to shortwave infrared.

In so doing, HISUI will afford an in-flight demonstration for future “hyperspectral” remote-sensing systems, which carries benefits from agriculture to forestry and from oil and gas exploration to understanding coastal erosion. HISUI has a long heritage, extending back to the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) aboard NASA’s 1999-launched Terra satellite.

The instrument will permit detailed inspections of rocks, soil, vegetation, snow and ice, as well as manmade objects to better understand their unique reflectance spectra. It will be plucked from Dragon’s trunk by the 57.7-foot-long (17.6-meter) Canadarm2 robotic arm, and handed off via the Dextre “hand” to the Kibo lab’s own robotic arm for installation in an Earth-facing (or “nadir”) orientation onto Port 8 of the EF. The HISUI data-storage system will be housed aboard the Kibo pressurized lab. Additionally, a limited quantity of HISUI data will be transmitted to ground stations in near-real-time. It is anticipated that up to 10 GB (equivalent to 18,000 square miles, or 30,000 square kilometers of ground coverage) will be downlinked daily, with a further 300 GB per day, roughly 560,000 square miles or 900,000 square kilometers, physically returned to Earth three or four times per year aboard Dragon cargo vehicles.

Although HISUI is perhaps the most visible aspect of the CRS-19 payload, a wide range of other investigations are packed aboard for Dragon’s ride uphill. All told, it is expected that some 7,300 pounds (3,310 kg) will be hauled to orbit on this mission, with an estimated 5,500 pounds (2,500 kg) returning to Earth in January 2020.  (...)
https://www.americaspace.com/2019/12/05/spacex-sends-19th-resupply-to-space-station-makes-20th-rocket-landing/

Falcon 9 launches Dragon cargo spacecraft to ISS
by Jeff Foust — December 5, 2019


A SpaceX Falcon 9 lifts off from Cape Canaveral, Fla., Dec. 5 carrying a Dragon spacecraft that will deliver cargo to the ISS. Credit: NASA TV

WASHINGTON — A SpaceX Falcon 9 successfully launched a Dragon cargo spacecraft bound for the International Space Station Dec. 5 on a mission that will also perform a test of the rocket’s upper stage.

The Falcon 9 lifted off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral, Florida, at 12:29 p.m. Eastern after a one-day delay caused by high upper-level winds. The Dragon spacecraft, flying a mission designated CRS-19 by SpaceX, separated from the upper stage about 10 minutes after liftoff, shortly after the rocket’s first stage landed on a droneship in the Atlantic Ocean.

This Dragon is making its third flight to the ISS, after the CRS-4 mission launched in September 2014 and CRS-11 in June 2017. This is the second time a Dragon spacecraft has been flown three times, and the eighth mission involving a reused Dragon.

CRS-19 is the penultimate mission in SpaceX’s original Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. SpaceX will transition to its follow-on CRS contract with the CRS-21 mission in the fall of 2020. Those missions will use a cargo version of the Crew Dragon spacecraft with increased payload volume and the ability to be flown on up to five missions each.

Unlike many recent Dragon cargo launches, where the Falcon 9 first stage makes a landing back at Cape Canaveral, the Falcon 9 for this mission landed on a SpaceX droneship in the Atlantic east of Jacksonville, Florida. Jessica Jensen, director of Dragon mission management at SpaceX, said the droneship landing was because of plans to use the rocket’s second stage for a “thermal demonstration” experiment after deploying the Dragon spacecraft.

“It’s going to be a long six-hour coast that then results in a disposal burn,” she said at a Dec. 3 press conference. “We need extra performance for that demonstration, so basically what we have to do is burn the first stage for a longer period of time so the second stage can have its performance reserved for that demo.” That, in turn, limited the ability of the first stage to return to Cape Canaveral, requiring the droneship landing.

Jensen said that demonstration was for “some of our other customers for longer demonstration missions that we’re going to have to fly in the future.” She didn’t identify those customers, but some national security missions, such as those that place payloads directly into geostationary orbit, do require long coast periods.

The Dragon is carrying 2,617 kilograms of cargo in the form of science experiments, crew supplies and hardware. They include a Japanese hyperspectral imager, a rodent research payload, an experiment studying the behavior of flames in microgavity and a “robot hotel” for storing robotic tools outside the station. It will arrive at the station early Dec. 8.

At the Dec. 3 press conference, Kenny Todd, NASA ISS operations integration manager, demurred when asked if the cargo included any holiday presents for the crew. “There’s always goodies on the flight in general,” he said. “As far as presents and so forth, I’m not sure I want to divulge anything, but I would tell you that Santa’s sleigh is, I think, certified for the vacuum of space.”
https://spacenews.com/falcon-9-launches-dragon-cargo-spacecraft-to-iss-2/

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2019/12/falcon-9-launch-crs-19-dragon-iss/

Dragon CRS-19 (SpX 19) https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/dragon.htm
HISUI ⇑  https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/hisui.htm
CIRiS ↑  https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/ciris.htm
SORTIE ↑  https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/sortie.htm
CryoCube 1 ↑  https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/cryocube-1.htm
QARMAN (QB50 BE05) ↑  https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/qarman.htm
AztechSat 1 ↑  https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/aztechsat-1.htm
EdgeCube ↑  https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/edgecube.htm
MakerSat 1 ↑  https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/makersat-0.htm
« Ostatnia zmiana: Czerwiec 25, 2020, 09:46 wysłana przez Orionid »

Offline artpoz

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 1426
Odp: Falcon 9 | CRS-19 | 5.12.2019
« Odpowiedź #35 dnia: Grudzień 07, 2019, 19:15 »
Booster B1059.1 dopłynął do portu.

https://youtu.be/PNvmrNTi29s

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNvmrNTi29s" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNvmrNTi29s</a>
« Ostatnia zmiana: Grudzień 07, 2019, 19:25 wysłana przez artpoz »

Offline Slavin

  • Senior
  • ****
  • Wiadomości: 656
  • Metanem i tlenem z odzyskiem
Odp: Falcon 9 | CRS-19 | 5.12.2019
« Odpowiedź #36 dnia: Grudzień 07, 2019, 19:29 »
Booster B1059.1 w porcie.




Offline kanarkusmaximus

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 21024
  • Ja z tym nie mam nic wspólnego!
    • Kosmonauta.net
Odp: Falcon 9 | CRS-19 | 5.12.2019
« Odpowiedź #37 dnia: Grudzień 08, 2019, 12:57 »
Dragon przechwycony i będzie niebawem przyłączany do ISS.

Offline suchyy

  • Senior
  • ****
  • Wiadomości: 494
Odp: Falcon 9 | CRS-19 | 5.12.2019
« Odpowiedź #38 dnia: Grudzień 08, 2019, 13:38 »
Tak dla ciekawych podam, że jeśli Ktoś próbował wczoraj zapolować na Dragona CRS-19 przy okazji widocznego nad Polską przelotu ISS, to musiał się skupić wizualnie wcześniej, zanim stacja przeleciała, bo Dragon leciał na 8 min (czasu) przed przelotem stacji!  ;) Ktoś obserwował i może potwierdzić (?), bo u mnie pogoda nie dopisała, jak zwykle ostatnio!  >:(
« Ostatnia zmiana: Grudzień 08, 2019, 14:17 wysłana przez suchyy »
Pozdrawiam: Jurek (suchyy).

Offline Slavin

  • Senior
  • ****
  • Wiadomości: 656
  • Metanem i tlenem z odzyskiem
Odp: Falcon 9 | CRS-19 | 5.12.2019
« Odpowiedź #39 dnia: Grudzień 08, 2019, 22:23 »
Dwie fotografie z lądowania pierwszego stopnia na barce.



Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 14418
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Falcon 9 | CRS-19 | 5.12.2019
« Odpowiedź #40 dnia: Grudzień 12, 2019, 13:59 »
Dragon CRS-19 na ISS
BY KRZYSZTOF KANAWKA ON 9 GRUDNIA 2019

(...) Przez kolejne kilkadziesiąt godzin Dragon “gonił” ISS. W pobliże Stacji Dragon dotarł 8 grudnia w godzinach porannych (czasu CET). Przechwycenie przez ramię robotyczne ISS (SSRMS) nastąpiło o godzinie 11:05 CET.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7IvHsuYsG-o" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7IvHsuYsG-o</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7IvHsuYsG-o&feature=emb_title

Przechwycenie Dragona CRS-19 przez SSRMS / Credits – NASA TV

Następnie, o godzinie 13:47 CET zakończyło się przyłączanie Dragona do Stacji. Prace z przyłączeniem Dragona przebiegały szybciej od planu. Przyłączenie do ISS nastąpiło około 90 minut szybciej.

Na pokładzie Dragona znalazł się duży zestaw eksperymentów naukowych – w tym małe zwięrzęta. NASA podsumowała część z tych eksperymentów na poniższym nagraniu. Ponadto, w sekcji nieciśnieniowej Dragona zainstalowano dwa ładunki o łącznej masie 924 kg – hiperspektralną kamerę HISUI oraz zestaw akumulatorów litowych. (...)
https://kosmonauta.net/2019/12/dragon-crs-19-na-iss/

SpaceX resupply mission reaches International Space Station
December 8, 2019 Stephen Clark


SpaceX’s Dragon supply ship in the grasp of the International Space Station’s robotic arm Sunday. Credit: NASA TV/Spaceflight Now

A commercial Dragon supply ship loaded with genetically-enhanced mice, a beer brewing experiment, a CubeSat developed by Mexican students and other scientific research payloads arrived at the International Space Station Sunday.

The SpaceX-owned robotic cargo freighter completed a three-day trek from a launch pad at Cape Canaveral with 5,769 pounds (2,617 kilograms) of supplies, experiments and hardware for the space station and its six-person crew.

Space station commander Luca Parmitano captured the Dragon spacecraft with the space station’s Canadian-built robotic arm at 5:05 a.m. EST (1005 GMT) Sunday. The robotic arm maneuvered the supply ship to a berthing port on the station’s Harmony module later Sunday, setting the stage for astronauts to open hatches and begin unpacking the fresh cargo. (...)
https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/12/08/spacex-resupply-mission-reaches-international-space-station/

Offline Slavin

  • Senior
  • ****
  • Wiadomości: 656
  • Metanem i tlenem z odzyskiem
Odp: Falcon 9 | CRS-19 | 5.12.2019
« Odpowiedź #41 dnia: Grudzień 12, 2019, 15:53 »
Nowe eksperymenty na ISS przywiezione przez statek Dragon CRS-19

Na zdjęciu tytułowym: Załoga Międzynarodowej Stacji Kosmicznej podczas specjalnego posiłku na Święto Dziękczynienia. Od lewej: Christina Koch, Aleksandr Skworcow, Jessica Meir, Oleg Skripoczka, Andrew Morgan i Luca Parmitano. Źródło: NASA.


Wraz z Dragonem CRS-19 na Międzynarodową Stację Kosmiczną przybyła masa nowych eksperymentów naukowych oraz zaopatrzenie dla załogi. Jakie nowe badania będą prowadzone na stacji?

Rakieta Falcon 9 wyniosła 5 grudnia br. w drogę do Międzynarodowej Stacji Kosmicznej statek towarowy Dragon. Statek został zacumowany do stacji za pomocą ramienia robotycznego 8 grudnia. Łączna masa przywiezionego towaru to 2 617 kg z czego 1693 kg umieszczono w hermetyzowanej części kapsuły:

977 kg eksperymentów naukowych
306 kg sprzętu konserwacyjnego
256 kg zaopatrzenia dla załogi
65 kg sprzętu do przyszłych spacerów kosmicznych
15 kg sprzętu komputerowego
W niehermetyzowanej części statku przymocowano ładunek o masie 924 kg. Na tą masę składają się m.in.: demonstrator technologiczny obrazowania hiperspektralnego HISUI i nowa bateria litowo-jonowa, która zastąpi uszkodzony akumulator wyniesiony rok temu.

Poniżej przedstawiamy kilka nowych eksperymentów jakie trafiły w tym locie na ISS.

Obrazowanie w wielu pasmach
Jednym z urządzeń, które trafiło na stację jest system obrazowania hiperspektralnego HISUI (Hyperspectral Imager Suite). Obrazowanie hiperspektralne to rejestracja obrazu na kilkudziesięciu pasmach światła. Dzięki tak dokładnemu obrazowaniu można więcej powiedzieć o charakterystyce obserwowanych obiektów. Naukowcy i inżynierowie przetestują w warunkach kosmicznych specjalnie przygotowany zestaw i zweryfikują jego działanie.

Obraz lodowca Chapman wykonany przez poprzednika instrumentu HISUI - urządzenie ASTER. Źródło: NASA/METI/AIST/Japan Space Systems, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.


Urządzenie zostanie zainstalowane na platformie JEM na japońskim module Kibo. Zarejestrowane obrazy będą przesyłane do magazynu danych, który znajdzie się wewnątrz modułu. Może tam trafiać nawet 300 GB danych na dzień. Nagrane obrazy będą wracały fizycznie na Ziemię podczas powrotnych misji towarowych i załogowych. Część informacji będzie też przesyłana na Ziemię transmisją z ISS. Za te operacje będzie odpowiadać japońska agencja kosmiczna JAXA.

Orbitalny słód jęczmienny
Na orbitę trafił też jęczmień w ramach eksperymentu Malting ABI Voyager Barley Seeds in Microgravity. Ziarna będą przerabiane na słód w zautomatyzowanym procesie. Naukowcy chcą się dowiedzieć czy wytworzony w warunkach mikrograwitacji słód różni się morfologicznie albo genetycznie od słodu wytworzonego w taki sam sposób, ale na Ziemi.

Eksperymenty z ogniem
Do stacji dostarczono też sprzęt do eksperymentu Confined Combustion, w którym sprawdzane będzie zachowanie się płomieni w warunkach mikrograwitacji w zamkniętych przestrzeniach. Naukowców interesuje jak na zachowanie płomienia będą wpływać otaczające ściany. Rozprzestrzenianie się ognia w zamkniętych przestrzeniach jest szczególnie niebezpieczne, z uwagi na to że nagrzane ściany wypromieniowując ciepło przyspieszają ten proces. Eksperyment może poprawić bezpieczeństwo nie tylko astronautów w przyszłych misjach kosmicznych, ale też może pozwolić lepiej kontrolować ogień na Ziemi. Dzięki warunkom panującym na orbicie badacze mogą badać fizykę płomieni bez uwzględniania grawitacji.

Urządzenie Confined Combustion podczas naziemnych testów integracyjnych przed lotem. Źródło: Chris Rogers.


Myszy do badań kości i mięśni
Na orbitę wysłano kolejną grupę myszy w ramach eksperymentu Rodent Research 19. Naukowcy zbadają dzięki nim jak miostatyna i inhibina wpływają na zanik tkanki kostnej i mięśniowej. Mikrograwitacja wymusza na astronautach konieczność ćwiczeń, co najmniej kilka godzin dziennie, aby zapobiegać zanikowi kości i mięśni podczas długiego pobytu na orbicie. Starzenie się, siedzący tryb życia i długie choroby obłożne powodują taki sam efekt na Ziemi. W warunkach orbitalnych przy przyspieszonej degradacji tkanek można w krótszym czasie weryfikować hipotezy dotyczące rozwoju takich chorób.

Ultrazimne chmury atomów
W ramach misji CRS-19 wysłano też na stację ulepszenia do urządzenia Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL). W eksperymencie tym można wytwarzać chmury atomów o bardzo niskich temperaturach, znacznie niższych niż te występujące w głębokiej przestrzeni kosmicznej. Nieważkość ułatwia osiąganie tak niskich temperatur i umożliwia też dłuższą obserwację wytworzonych chmur. Naukowcy są w tym eksperymencie zainteresowani badaniem fundamentalnych praw fizyki kwantowej, co staje się często możliwe dopiero w taki niskich temperaturach. Wysłane ulepszenia zawierają sensory do bardzo dokładnego pomiaru sił grawitacji.

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/spx19-research

https://www.urania.edu.pl/wiadomosci/nowe-eksperymenty-na-iss-przywiezione-przez-statek-dragon-crs-19

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/explorer/index.html




Offline kanarkusmaximus

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 21024
  • Ja z tym nie mam nic wspólnego!
    • Kosmonauta.net
Odp: Falcon 9 | CRS-19 | 5.12.2019
« Odpowiedź #42 dnia: Styczeń 07, 2020, 13:14 »
Dziś się kończy misja CRS-19. O 11:05 CET Dragon odłączył się od ISS.

Offline mss

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 5629
  • Space is not only about science, it is a vision,
    • Astronauci i ich loty...
Odp: Falcon 9 | CRS-19 | 5.12.2019
« Odpowiedź #43 dnia: Styczeń 07, 2020, 17:45 »
O 16:42 Dragon-19 wodował na Pacyfiku.

Cytuj
Splashdown of Dragon confirmed, completing this spacecraft’s third mission to and from the @space_station!

Cytuj
The SpaceX Dragon spacecraft splashed down at 10:42 a.m. in the Pacific Ocean about 271 miles southwest of Long Beach, California, marking the end of the company’s 19th contracted cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station for NASA.

   
AddThis Sharing Buttons
Share to Facebook
FacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to PinterestPinterestShare to TumblrTumblrShare to MyspaceMyspaceShare to Blogger
Blogger
The SpaceX Dragon separates from the International Space Station
A camera on the tip of the Canadarm2 robotic arm views the SpaceX Dragon as it separates from the International Space Station.

The SpaceX Dragon spacecraft splashed down at 10:42 a.m. in the Pacific Ocean about 271 miles southwest of Long Beach, California, marking the end of the company’s 19th contracted cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station for NASA.

A key component being returned aboard Dragon is a faulty battery charge-discharge unit (BCDU), which failed to activate following the Oct. 11 installation of new lithium-ion batteries on the space station’s truss. The BCDU was removed and replaced during a spacewalk Oct. 18 by Expedition 61 flight engineers Christina Koch and Jessica Meir of NASA. The unit are being returned to teams on Earth for an evaluation and repair.
« Ostatnia zmiana: Styczeń 07, 2020, 20:44 wysłana przez mss »
Intel Core i5-2320 3GHz/8GB RAM/AMD Radeon HD 7700 Series/HD 1 TB/Sony DVD ROM...

Offline mss

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 5629
  • Space is not only about science, it is a vision,
    • Astronauci i ich loty...
Odp: Falcon 9 | CRS-19 | 5.12.2019
« Odpowiedź #44 dnia: Styczeń 08, 2020, 23:22 »
Ciekawe fotki Dragona-19 w czasie transportu z wodowania:

Cytuj
Back from space! CRS-19 Dragon capsule has docked at Port of LA aboard NRC Quest. 🚀 #SpaceX #crs19 #nasa





źródło: https://twitter.com/w00ki33/status/1215019369287147521
Intel Core i5-2320 3GHz/8GB RAM/AMD Radeon HD 7700 Series/HD 1 TB/Sony DVD ROM...

Polskie Forum Astronautyczne

Odp: Falcon 9 | CRS-19 | 5.12.2019
« Odpowiedź #44 dnia: Styczeń 08, 2020, 23:22 »