Autor Wątek: Dragon 2 - IAT (In-Flight Abort Test) 19.01.2020  (Przeczytany 15724 razy)

0 użytkowników i 2 Gości przegląda ten wątek.

Offline mss

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 5236
  • Space is not only about science, it is a vision,
    • Astronauci i ich loty...
Odp: Dragon 2 - IAT (In-Flight Abort Test) 2020
« Odpowiedź #165 dnia: Styczeń 20, 2020, 22:46 »
Cytuj
She’s back! The #CrewDragon spacecraft that completed the in-flight abort test has arrived back at Cape Canaveral. After splashdown, teams from @SpaceX & the @usairforce 45th Operations Group’s Detachment-3 rehearsed crew recovery ops before bringing the spacecraft back to port.
Intel Core i5-2320 3GHz/8GB RAM/AMD Radeon HD 7700 Series/HD 1 TB/Sony DVD ROM...

Offline maackn

  • Junior
  • **
  • Wiadomości: 74
Odp: Dragon 2 - IAT (In-Flight Abort Test) 2020
« Odpowiedź #166 dnia: Styczeń 20, 2020, 23:36 »
Jakiś taki prawie cały nawet... wyklepią, podszpachlują i jeszcze raz poleci.

Offline mss

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 5236
  • Space is not only about science, it is a vision,
    • Astronauci i ich loty...
Odp: Dragon 2 - IAT (In-Flight Abort Test) 2020
« Odpowiedź #167 dnia: Styczeń 22, 2020, 00:17 »
Ten egzemplarz już więcej nie poleci. Nowy egzemplarz Dragona dla misji DM-2 ma być gotowy pod koniec stycznia i przetransportowany z Kalifornii na Florydę, celem dalszych przygotowań do lotu na orbitę i połączenia z ISS.
Intel Core i5-2320 3GHz/8GB RAM/AMD Radeon HD 7700 Series/HD 1 TB/Sony DVD ROM...

Offline mars76

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 2452
  • MARS - Zmień swoje miejsce zamieszkania!
Odp: Dragon 2 - IAT (In-Flight Abort Test) 2020
« Odpowiedź #168 dnia: Styczeń 22, 2020, 01:39 »
Ten egzemplarz już więcej nie poleci. Nowy egzemplarz Dragona dla misji DM-2 ma być gotowy pod koniec stycznia i przetransportowany z Kalifornii na Florydę, celem dalszych przygotowań do lotu na orbitę i połączenia z ISS.
Może polecieć w wersji cargo

Polskie Forum Astronautyczne

Odp: Dragon 2 - IAT (In-Flight Abort Test) 2020
« Odpowiedź #168 dnia: Styczeń 22, 2020, 01:39 »

Offline alnitak

  • Senior
  • ****
  • Wiadomości: 742
  • LOXem i ropą! ;)
Odp: Dragon 2 - IAT (In-Flight Abort Test) 2020
« Odpowiedź #169 dnia: Styczeń 22, 2020, 01:55 »
Może polecieć w wersji cargo
Już nie.Cargo będzie produkowany osobno

Offline mars76

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 2452
  • MARS - Zmień swoje miejsce zamieszkania!
Odp: Dragon 2 - IAT (In-Flight Abort Test) 2020
« Odpowiedź #170 dnia: Styczeń 22, 2020, 07:35 »
Może polecieć w wersji cargo
Już nie.Cargo będzie produkowany osobno
Skąd masz te wiadomości (możesz linka podać? ), mieli załogowe przerabiać na cargo

Offline Mikkael

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 1858
  • "Per aspera ad astra"
GG 8698011

Offline alnitak

  • Senior
  • ****
  • Wiadomości: 742
  • LOXem i ropą! ;)
Odp: Dragon 2 - IAT (In-Flight Abort Test) 2020
« Odpowiedź #172 dnia: Styczeń 22, 2020, 12:29 »
Skąd masz te wiadomości (możesz linka podać? ), mieli załogowe przerabiać na cargo
Na forum NSF pisali o tym.Podobno za dużo roboty przy przerabianiu kapsuły na cargo i łatwiej wyprodukować nową

Offline ekoplaneta

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 7035
  • One planet Once chance
Odp: Dragon 2 - IAT (In-Flight Abort Test) 2020
« Odpowiedź #173 dnia: Styczeń 22, 2020, 13:15 »
Mam nadzieję że przez to będzie więcej kapsuł do muzeów.  :)

Offline mss

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 5236
  • Space is not only about science, it is a vision,
    • Astronauci i ich loty...
Odp: Dragon 2 - IAT (In-Flight Abort Test) 2020
« Odpowiedź #174 dnia: Styczeń 24, 2020, 22:18 »
Opublikowano wstępne rezultaty testu IAT:

SpaceX releases preliminary results from Crew Dragon abort test

January 23, 2020 by Stephen Clark

Data from the Jan. 19 in-flight launch escape demonstration of SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft indicate the performance of the capsule’s SuperDraco abort engines was “flawless” as the thrusters boosted the ship away from the top of a Falcon 9 rocket with a peak acceleration of about 3.3Gs, officials said Thursday.

The Jan. 19 test demonstrated the Crew Dragon’s ability to safely carry astronauts away from a launch emergency, such as a rocket failure, and return the crew to a parachute-assisted splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean.

For its final full-scale test before astronauts ride it into space, the Crew Dragon spacecraft lifted off at 10:30 a.m. EST (1530 GMT) on Jan. 19 from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. A Falcon 9 rocket carried the capsule aloft — just as it would on a crewed mission — for the first 85 seconds of the mission.

The Crew Dragon began its launch escape maneuver at 10:31:25 a.m. EST (1531:25 GMT) — initiated by a low setting of an on-board acceleration trigger — when the Falcon 9 was traveling at a velocity around 1,200 mph (536 meters per second), according to SpaceX.

Eight SuperDraco thrusters immediately pressurized and ignited as the Falcon 9 rocket’s first stage engines were commanded to shut down as part of the abort sequence.

The escape engines on the Crew Dragon produced nearly 130,000 pounds of thrust at full power. The SuperDracos performed flawlessly, SpaceX said, accelerating the capsule away from the top of the Falcon 9 at a peak acceleration of 3.3Gs.

The SuperDracos accelerated the spacecraft from about 1,200 mph up to more than 1,500 mph (about 675 meters per second) in approximately seven seconds, according to SpaceX.


While the Crew Dragon boosted itself away from the Falcon 9, the rest of the rocket was expected to break apart from aerodynamic forces. It did just that, disintegrating suddenly in a fireball as the crew capsule safely sped away.

Although the Falcon 9 erupted in a fireball seconds after the Crew Dragon escaped the rocket on the Jan. 19 abort test, the crew capsule is designed to get away from a rocket even if it explodes or breaks apart with little warning, according to Elon Musk, SpaceX’s founder and CEO.

“In principle, the system is designed to withstand an adverse booster explosion … that happens even before the escape event,” Musk said at a press conference after Sunday’s abort test. “So it’s it’s intended to be very robust, in principle. And … it’s less of an explosion than it is fire. It’s a fireball, but it’s more for a fireball than it is an over overpressure event like an explosion.

“And since the spacecraft has a very powerful base heat shield and even the leeward side heat shield, it should be really not significantly affected by a fireball,” Musk said. “So it could quite literally — like something out of Star Wars — fly right out of the fireball. Obviously, we want to avoid doing that but. But it is really meant to be something that can fly out of the fireball.”

Unlike other crew capsules, such as Russia’s Soyuz spacecraft and NASA’s Orion deep space exploration vehicle, the Falcon 9 and Crew Dragon do not have a large abort tower mounted to the top of the rocket. The Soyuz and Orion capsules use solid-fueled “tractor” abort systems that pull the spacecraft away from its launch vehicle in the event of a failure.

The Crew Dragon uses SuperDraco engines fed by hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide propellants to push the capsule away from a failing rocket.

Musk said the Jan. 19 abort test appeared “picture-perfect” at first glance.

SpaceX said the telemetry signal from the Falcon 9 rocket halted around 11 seconds after the escape burn, suggesting a “comfortable” distance of about 4,900 feet (1.5 kilometers) between the Crew Dragon and the Falcon 9 fireball.

The Crew Dragon reached a top speed on the abort test of about Mach 2.3, and a maximum altitude of more than 131,000 feet (40 kilometers).

The capsule jettisoned its unpressurized trunk section, which fell to the Atlantic Ocean, before deploying parachutes to slow itself for splashdown.

The drogue chutes deployed at an altitude of about 19,000 feet (5.8 kilometers), and the Crew Dragon’s four main chutes unfurled around 6,500 feet (2 kilometers) above the ocean.

The capsule splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean around 26 miles (42 kilometers) east of the launch site at 10:38:54 a.m. EST (1538:54 GMT), just under nine minutes after liftoff, according to data released by SpaceX.

Recovery teams picked up the capsule from the sea and hoisted it on the deck of SpaceX’s Crew Dragon retrieval ship — named Go Searcher — for the trip back to Port Canaveral. The spaceship returned to port less than nine hours after launch, demonstrating SpaceX teams can quickly return the capsule to land after a splashdown close to shore.

With the Crew Dragon in-flight escape test complete, engineers will analyze additional data over the coming weeks to verify everything functioned as designed. Assuming no showstoppers, the abort demonstration was the final planned test flight of a full-scale Dragon capsule before NASA clears the commercial crew ferry ship to carry astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken to the International Space Station.

At least two more drop tests to test the Crew Dragon’s parachutes are planned beginning in mid-February.

The parachutes and launch abort propulsion system have been the primary drivers of Crew Dragon schedule delays over the last year. SpaceX encountered chute failures during the capsule’s development, and an explosion destroyed a Crew Dragon spacecraft during an attempted ground test-firing of its SuperDraco thrusters last year.

While data reviews are underway, NASA is evaluating whether to extend the duration of the Crew Dragon’s first piloted test flight from a week-long mission to the space station to a longer stay that could have Hurley and Behnken live and work aboard the orbiting outpost for months.

Officials said they will factor in the astronauts’ training schedules — which may be lengthened if they’re approved for an extended stay at the space station — and the schedule of other crew rotation missions to the orbiting research lab before setting a target launch date for Hurley and Behnken.

NASA and SpaceX said after the Jan. 19 abort test that the first Crew Dragon launch with astronauts could occur in the second quarter of this year, between the beginning of April and the end of June.

SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft and Boeing’s Starliner crew capsule are in the final stages of testing before NASA approves the vehicles to carry astronauts. NASA has multibillion-dollar contracts with both companies to develop the human-rated spaceships.

Both capsules are designed to end NASA’s sole reliance on Russian Soyuz spacecraft for crew rotation missions to the space station, an operating scheme NASA has been in since the retirement of the space shuttle in 2011.


źródło: https://spaceflightnow.com/2020/01/23/spacex-releases-preliminary-results-from-crew-dragon-abort-test/
« Ostatnia zmiana: Styczeń 24, 2020, 22:20 wysłana przez mss »
Intel Core i5-2320 3GHz/8GB RAM/AMD Radeon HD 7700 Series/HD 1 TB/Sony DVD ROM...

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 13379
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Dragon 2 - IAT (In-Flight Abort Test) 19.01.2020
« Odpowiedź #175 dnia: Styczeń 25, 2020, 07:19 »
Ostatni test Dragona
  19.01. o 15:30 z KSC wystrzelona została RN Falcon-9, która wyniosła na trajektorię balistyczną statek Crew Dragon,
celem przeprowadzenia testu IAT (In-Flight Abort Test), przerwania startu w fazie MaxQ. To ostatni test statku przed
rozpoczęciem lotów załogowych.
http://lk.astronautilus.pl/n200116.htm#03

Udany test ucieczkowy kapsuły Dragon 2
BY KRZYSZTOF KANAWKA ON 19 STYCZNIA 2020


Ucieczka kapsuły Dragon 2 od rakiety Falcon 9 / Credits - SpaceX

Dziewiętnastego stycznia firma SpaceX przeprowadziła udany test ucieczki kapsuły Dragon 2 od rakiety nośnej w trakcie startu.

Jednym z krytycznych elementów bezpieczeństwa lotu załogowego jest możliwość ucieczki pojazdu w trakcie startu. Gdyby w trakcie lotu doszło do awarii rakiety nośnej pojazd musi bardzo szybko się od niej oddzielić, ratując załogę przed kryzysową sytuacją. W przypadku dwóch budowanych i testowanych obecnie kapsuł nowej generacji – Dragon 2 i CST-100 Starliner – NASA ustanowiła wysokie wymagania bezpieczeństwa.

Firma SpaceX przeprowadziła 19 stycznia 2020 roku test ucieczki kapsuły Dragon 2 podczas startu rakiety Falcon 9. Test został przeprowadzony w rejonie maksymalnych obciążeń aerodynamicznych (“max Q”), najbardziej krytycznym (i niebezpiecznym) etapie wznoszenia rakiety. Start nastąpił o godzinie 16:30 CET, a mniej niż 90 sekund po starcie doszło do separacji kapsuły Dragon 2. Oddzielenie i ucieczka kapsuły Dragon 2 przebiegła prawidłowo.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ARIZnaMXTEU" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ARIZnaMXTEU</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ARIZnaMXTEU&feature=emb_title

Zapis testu ucieczki kapsuły Dragon 2 / Credits – NASA

Tak jak się spodziewano, tuż po separacji od rakiety, doszło do eksplozji Falcona 9. W tym teście zarówno pierwszy jak i drugi stopień rakiety były w pełni zatankowane (w drugim stopniu brakowało jedynie silnika).


Eksplozja Falcona 9 po ucieczce Dragona 2 / Credits – SpaceX

Około 9 minut po starcie doszło do udanego wodowania kapsuły Dragon 2. Odzyskanie kapsuły będzie trwać kilkadziesiąt minut, ale w regionie wodowania przebywał zespół ratunkowy. W tym teście prace poszczególnych zespołów postępowały w taki sposób, jakiego można się spodziewać podczas startu z astronautami na pokładzie kapsuły.

Udany test ucieczki Dragona 2 otwiera drogę do pierwszej misji załogowej. Ta misja orbitalna do Międzynarodowej Stacji Kosmicznej (ISS) może nastąpić w ciągu kilku najbliższych miesięcy.

Po teście NASA zorganizowała konferencję prasową z udziałem Elona Muska. Na konferencji potwierdzono, że test prawdopodobnie przebiegł prawidłowo. Maksymalne przeciążenie podczas ucieczki wyniosło 3,5 g, zaś podczas opadania – ok 2,5 g. Są to stosunkowo niskie wartości, znacznie niższe niż podczas nieudanego startu Sojuza MS-10 (październik 2018). Ponadto, Elon Musk poinformował, że sprzęt do pierwszej misji załogowej będzie gotowy pod koniec lutego 2020.

(Tw, S-X, PFA)
https://kosmonauta.net/2020/01/udany-test-ucieczkowy-kapsuly-dragon-2/#prettyPhoto

Crew Dragon po próbie ewakuacji w locie. Ostatnia prosta do misji załogowej [WIDEO]
20 stycznia 2020, 14:22

W niedzielę 19 stycznia doszło do testowego awaryjnego zrzutu eksperymentalnej kapsuły załogowej Crew Dragon. Nowy pojazd SpaceX przeszedł próbę ewakuacji z pozytywnym rezultatem... i w widowiskowym stylu. Start - z dwoma manekinami na pokładzie - stanowił kluczowy kamień milowy programu, bezpośrednio poprzedzający zapowiadane od dawna pierwsze podejście do lotu z prawdziwą załogą na pokładzie.

Ważna próba awaryjnego zrzutu kapsuły Crew Dragon rozpoczęła się odpaleniem "jednorazowej" wersji rakiety Falcon 9 w niedzielę 19 stycznia 2020 roku o godz. 16:30 czasu polskiego (CET). Początkowo test był planowany na sobotę, ale przełożono go o jeden dzień z powodu niesprzyjających warunków pogodowych, m.in. silnego wiatru.

Jedyny dostępny w tym momencie egzemplarz statku Crew Dragon (po stracie pierwszego lotnego prototypu w kwietniu 2019 roku) wystartował z Przylądka Canaveral na Florydzie. Po niecałych dwóch minutach lotu, na wysokości 19 km nad Ziemią, od systemu nośnego oddzieliła się kapsuła pasażerska z dwoma manekinami w swoim wnętrzu. Wykorzystała do tego zestaw swoich własnych silników SuperDraco. Krótko potem, po osiągnięciu bezpiecznego dystansu przez statek załogowy, główny stopień rakiety uległ samozniszczeniu w efektownej eksplozji. Jego szczątki opadły następnie do Atlantyku.

Kapsuła natomiast kontynuowała samodzielnie wznoszenie aż na wysokość 44 km, po czym zaczęła kierować się w stronę Ziemi i na spadochronach opadła także do oceanu - ok. 32 km od wybrzeży Florydy. Cały test trwał 9 minut.

Próba była z założenia finalnym etapem serii testów bezpieczeństwa sprzętu firmy SpaceX, które miały na celu otrzymanie certyfikacji NASA na regularne transportowanie ludzi na Międzynarodową Stację Kosmiczną (ISS). Pierwszymi astronautami, którzy zasiądą w statku kosmicznym Elona Muska, mają być Bob Behnken i Doug Hurley. Ich lot powinien odbyć się jeszcze w tym roku.

Wraz z definitywnym wycofaniem w 2011 roku ze służby amerykańskich wahadłowców Państwowa Agencja Aeronautyki i Przestrzeni Kosmicznej (NASA) została pozbawiona własnych środków transportowania astronautów i zaopatrzenia na Międzynarodową Stację Kosmiczną (ISS). Wymiana członków załogi stacji realizowana jest obecnie wyłącznie za pomocą rosyjskich statków Sojuz.

Aby zmienić ten stan rzeczy, władze USA i kierownictwo NASA postanowiły zwrócić się do amerykańskich spółek prywatnych, zamiast podejmować kosztowny własny program budowy nowych pojazdów do współpracy z ISS. Dzięki temu Boeing udostępni NASA swe załogowe statki Starliner, wynoszone w kosmos przez rakiety Atlas, a w przypadku SpaceX będą to statki Dragon w wersji załogowej (Crew Dragon) i jego rakiety nośne Falcon-9.

Statki Starliner i Dragon nadają się do wielokrotnego użycia, co dotyczy również pierwszego stopnia rakiety Falcon-9. Towarowa wersja Dragona wykonała już kilkanaście lotów zaopatrzeniowych na ISS.

Opracowanie: PAP/MK
https://www.space24.pl/crew-dragon-po-probie-ewakuacji-w-locie-ostatnia-prosta-do-misji-zalogowej-wideo

https://spacex.com.pl/wiadomosci/test-systemu-ewakuacji-zalogowej-kapsuly-dragon-w-czasie-lotu
https://www.urania.edu.pl/wiadomosci/udany-test-systemu-ucieczkowego-statku-crew-dragon

NASA, SpaceX Target Jan 18 for Major In-Flight Abort Test of Crew Dragon
By Mike Killian, on January 11th, 2020

(...) Fortunately they survived, but things easily could have turned out the opposite. Even a proven system like Soyuz can’t escape the inevitable. Things will go wrong, and the upcoming Crew Dragon In-Flight Abort Test will ensure future Dragon crews can safely escape an in-flight emergency. (...)
https://www.americaspace.com/2020/01/11/nasa-spacex-target-jan-18-for-major-in-flight-abort-test-of-crew-dragon/

Weather Forces SpaceX to Push In-Flight Abort to NET Sunday
By Ben Evans, on January 17th, 2020


While crew members won’t be aboard Crew Dragon for the SpaceX In-Flight Abort Test, astronauts Bob Behnken & Doug Hurley rehearsed what they’ll experience during their missions. Photo: NASA
https://www.americaspace.com/2020/01/17/spacex-ready-for-final-major-test-before-flying-astronauts-with-crew-dragon-in-flight-abort-sat-morning/

Photos: Crew Dragon returns to port after in-flight abort test
January 20, 2020 Stephen Clark


The Crew Dragon spacecraft arrives at Port Canaveral on Jan. 19, 2020, after SpaceX’s in-flight abort test. Credit: Stephen Clark / Spaceflight Now
https://spaceflightnow.com/2020/01/20/photos-crew-dragon-returns-to-port-after-in-flight-abort-test/

SpaceX Flies In-Flight Abort Test for NASA, Paves Way to Crewed Flights This Year
By Ben Evans, on January 19th, 2020

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gE8bThWFegc" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gE8bThWFegc</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gE8bThWFegc&feature=emb_title

Video credit: SpaceX





Astronauts Bob Behnken & Doug Hurley talk with media after watching Crew Dragon’s in-flight abort test. They will be the first frew to fly the spacecraft later this year on the ‘Demo-2’ mission to and from the ISS. Photo: Mike Killian / AmericaSpace.com
https://www.americaspace.com/2020/01/19/spacex-flies-in-flight-abort-test-for-nasa-paves-way-to-crewed-flights-this-year/

U.S. Space Launch Manifest
https://www.americaspace.com/launch-schedule/

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2020/01/spacex-crew-dragon-in-flight-abort-test/

https://blogs.nasa.gov/commercialcrew/2020/01/19/nasa-spacex-complete-final-major-flight-test-of-crew-spacecraft/

https://www.kennedyspacecenter.com/launches-and-events/events-calendar/2020/january/rocket-launch-spacex-falcon-9-ccp-in-flight-abort-test

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/19/science/spacex-launch-dragon.html

https://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=3851.msg140742#msg140742

Artykuły astronautyczne
« Ostatnia zmiana: Czerwiec 04, 2020, 16:34 wysłana przez Orionid »

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 13379
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Dragon 2 - IAT (In-Flight Abort Test) 19.01.2020
« Odpowiedź #176 dnia: Luty 04, 2020, 08:33 »
Test ucieczki Dragon 2 – nagrania
BY KRZYSZTOF KANAWKA ON 4 LUTEGO 2020

(...) Poniżej prezentujemy kilka ciekawych nagrań z tego testu. Oprócz samej ucieczki Dragona 2 największe zainteresowanie wywołała eksplozja pierwszego stopnia Falcona 9.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ARIZnaMXTEU" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ARIZnaMXTEU</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ARIZnaMXTEU&feature=emb_title

Zapis testu / Credits – NASA

(...)
https://kosmonauta.net/2020/02/test-ucieczki-dragon-2-nagrania/

Polskie Forum Astronautyczne

Odp: Dragon 2 - IAT (In-Flight Abort Test) 19.01.2020
« Odpowiedź #176 dnia: Luty 04, 2020, 08:33 »