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« Odpowiedź #120 dnia: Marzec 27, 2020, 04:08 »
Ostatni AEHF
26.03. o 20:18:00,148 z Cape Canaveral wystrzelona została RN Atlas-5/551, która wyniosła w T+28' 52" na orbitę
o parametrach: hp=190 km, ha=35314 km, i=26,61° satelitę TDO-2 (CubeSat 12U), a w T+5h 38' 08" na orbitę
o parametrach: hp=10890 km, ha=35310 km, i=13,72° ostatniego wojskowego satelitę telekomunikacyjnego AEHF-6.
Zostanie on własnym napędem umieszczony na orbicie geostacjonarnej.
http://lk.astronautilus.pl/n200316.htm#07

                                                     






<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eaa3lADTlTQ" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eaa3lADTlTQ</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eaa3lADTlTQ&feature=emb_title

ULA’s Atlas 5 launches AEHF-6 communications satellite in its first mission for U.S. Space Force
by Sandra Erwin — March 26, 2020


A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket lifted off March 26, 2020, at 4:18 PM EST carrying the AEHF-6 satellite. Credit: ULA

SMC Commander Lt. Gen. Thompson: “The AEHF launch is one of those we consider absolutely mission essential.”

WASHINGTON — A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket lifted off on March 26 at 4:18 PM EST from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, carrying a $1.4 billion Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF-6) communications satellite for the U.S. Space Force.

This was the sixth and final satellite of the AEHF constellation that provides secure, jam-proof voice and data communications for U.S. national leadership, military forces and international partners Canada, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and Australia. All six were manufactured by Lockheed Martin.

The Atlas 5 flew in the 551 configuration with five side-mounted solid rocket boosters.

The launch was set to go at 2:57 PM but there was an unplanned hold called at T-minus 46 seconds. ULA CEO Tory Bruno on Twitter explained the hold was due to a fault in the ground hydraulics accumulator.

“Bad amplifier card on a ground system hydraulic pump controller. Working on a solution,” Bruno tweeted.

ULA engineers were able to fix the problem and get the Atlas 5 off within the two-hour launch window.

Atlas 5 rockets launched the first five AEHF satellites in 2010, 2012, 2013, 2018 and 2019.

This was ULA’s 138th launch, the 83rd of the Atlas 5 rocket since 2002 and the 11th in the 551 configuration. The mission also marked the 500th flight of the Aerojet Rocketdyne RL10 engine that powers the Centaur upper stage. Aerojet also provided the five AJ-60A solid rocket boosters.

Lt. Gen. John Thompson, commander of the U.S. Space Force Space and Missile Systems Center, told SpaceNews in a March 25 interview that it was important for get AEHF-6 launched on schedule despite reduced staff and other challenges related to the coronavirus pandemic.

“The AEHF launch is one of those we consider absolutely mission essential,” said Thompson. “These satellites are hugely important to presidential and national leadership communications in a crisis. They are also essential to warfighters and allies.”

The deployment of the sixth satellite ensures that the AEHF constellation will stay in service beyond 2030, Thompson said.

On its way to AEHF’s final orbit, the upper stage of the Atlas 5 at 4:47 PM released a small rideshare payload named TDO-2. The 12U cubesat carried U.S. government experimental payloads that will test optical calibration and satellite laser-ranging technologies for space domain awareness.

The rideshare satellite, sponsored by the Air Force Research Laboratory, was developed by the Georgia Institute of Technology and integrated by Parsons Corp.

The Centaur upper stage will deploy AEHF-6 after a five-hour coast.

https://spacenews.com/ulas-atlas-5-launches-aehf-6-communications-satellite-in-its-first-mission-for-u-s-space-force/

Atlas V Primed for First U.S. Space Force Launch Thursday with AEHF-6
By Ben Evans, on March 24th, 2020


The sixth and final USAF Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF-6) satellite, encapsulated within its Payload Fairing, is transported to the Vertical Integration Facility (VIF) at Space Launch Complex (SLC)-41 for stacking atop its Atlas V rocket. Photos: ULA


The Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) is a series of spacecraft operated by the U.S. Space Force to provide civilian leaders with unrivaled communications with military assets around the world. Photo Credit: ULA/Twitter
https://www.americaspace.com/2020/03/24/atlas-v-primed-for-first-u-s-space-force-launch-thursday-with-aehf-6/

Atlas V Launches AEHF-6 Military SATCOM from Cape Canaveral
By Ben Evans, on March 26th, 2020


The first mission under the newly formed U.S. Space Force took flight today from Cape Canaveral, FL, as a ULA Atlas V rocket launched the AEHF-6 SATCOM. Photo: ULA

(...) As outlined in AmericaSpace’s preview feature, the multi-month campaign to launch AEHF-6 has taken place on several fronts. In early January, the Atlas V Common Core Booster (CCB) and Centaur upper stage were delivered by ULA’s RocketShip vessel from Decatur, Ala., to the Cape, whereupon both went their separate ways for pre-flight processing. The Centaur was moved directly to the VIF at SLC-41, whilst the Atlas V itself headed initially to the holding bay of the Atlas Spacecraft Operations Center (ASOC). On 19 February, both of these huge rocket components came together in the VIF for the Launch Vehicle On Stand (LVOS) milestone and by month’s end all five solid-fueled boosters had been installed around the CCB base. Finally, on 12 March, the bullet-shaped Short Payload Fairing (SPF), housing the AEHF-6 cargo, was mounted atop the stack.

Hopes to fly as soon as 19 March were postponed by a few days, thanks to the need to swap out a troublesome valve which had exhibited off-nominal readings. Additional time to complete testing of the replacement valve obliged ULA to settle on 26 March as the earliest available launch date. And despite the steady worldwide march of the COVID-19 coronavirus, ULA CEO Tory Bruno expressed no reservations about the performance capability of the Atlas V. “Mighty Atlas will be socially distancing from you at around 20,000 mph (32,000 km/h),” he tweeted Wednesday, “but you can still see him from your backyard if you live in Florida or the Georgia/Carolina coast.”

With a predicted 80-percent likelihood of acceptable weather, Thursday promised to be an ideal day to fly. “High pressure remains in control through the weekend, resulting in mainly dry conditions and unusually warm temperatures,” noted the 45th Weather Squadron at Patrick Air Force Base in its L-1 briefing on Wednesday. “The primary concern for both Thursday and Friday remains the Cumulus Cloud Rule.” However, it was stressed that the likelihood of acceptable conditions would improve to 90-percent favourable in the event of a 24-hour scrub to Friday. Shortly after arrival at the pad, technicians and engineers began loading RP-1—a highly refined form of rocket-grade kerosene—into the Atlas V’s tanks, with cryogenic tanking of liquid oxygen and hydrogen slated to begin in the final hours prior to Thursday’s launch.

Atlas 5 launch caps deployment of ultra-secure military communications network
March 26, 2020 Stephen Clark


An Atlas 5 rocket fired off pad 41 at Cape Canaveral at 4:18 p.m. EDT (2018 GMT) Thursday. Credit: United Launch Alliance

The sixth and final satellite in the U.S. military’s most secure satellite communications fleet lifted off from Cape Canaveral Thursday aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, extending the network’s expected lifetime beyond 2030. (...)

Thursday’s mission marked the 500th production RL10 engine to be flown. RL10 engines, which burn liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants, have flown on Atlas, Saturn and Titan rockets, sending spacecraft toward every planet in the solar system.

After the Centaur’s second burn — around a half-hour after liftoff — the rocket released a small suitcase-sized CubeSat secondary payload named TDO 2.

Sponsored by the Air Force Research Laboratory and produced at the Georgia Institute of Technology, the TDO 2 spacecraft is based on a 12U CubeSat design. Its mission will support “space domain awareness” through optical calibration and satellite laser ranging, according to the U.S. Space Force’s Space and Missile Systems Center.

After deploying the TDO 2 payload, the Centaur coasted for five hours before reigniting the RL10 engine for a third time to reshape the rocket’s orbit. The final RL10 burn occurred at an altitude of around 22,000 miles (35,000 kilometers).

The planned 88-second burn raised the orbit’s perigee, or low point, and reduced its inclination. The maneuver placed the AEHF 6 spacecraft closer to its operating orbit, reducing the satellite’s expected fuel usage and extending its usable lifetime.

At 9:59 p.m. EDT (0159 GMT), the Centaur stage released the AEHF 6 spacecraft. Minutes later, satellite-builder Lockheed Martin confirmed ground teams were receiving signals from the new satellite.

“We are thrilled to accomplish this important milestone on the last AEHF satellite,” said Col. John Dukes, senior materiel leader for the geosynchronous orbit division of SMC’s production corps. “The combined integrated team worked diligently to ensure the success of this mission. The satellite is operating as expected and is ready to undergo orbit raising and on-orbit testing for the next several months after which it will provide mission critical capabilities to our warfighters.”



The AEHF 6 satellite was encapsulated inside the Atlas 5 rocket’s payload fairing in February ahead of Thursday’s launch. Credit: United Launch Alliance

The successful launch Thursday marked the first deployment of a U.S. Space Force payload since the formal establishment of the new military service in December. The AEHF satellites were previously managed the Air Force, and the first five launched on Atlas 5 rockets from Cape Canaveral beginning in August 2010.

The Space Force remains part of the Air Force, but the new service took over units formerly under the authority of Air Force Space Command.

“Congratulations to the U.S. Space Force on liftoff of your first mission,” said Tory Bruno, ULA’s president and CEO, in a statement. “We are proud to be your partner for this historic mission and honored to have launched the entire Lockheed Martin produced AEHF constellation on Atlas 5 rockets. We understand the critical importance of delivering protected communications to strategic command and tactical warfighters operating on ground, sea and air.”

U.S. military satellite tracking data indicated the AEHF 6 spacecraft separated from the Centaur upper stage in an elliptical transfer orbit ranging between 6,767 miles (10,891 kilometers) and 21,492 miles (35,313 kilometers), with an inclination of 13.7 degrees to the equator.

Those orbit figures were very close to pre-launch predictions. The RL10’s final burn before deploying the AEHF 6 satellite was programmed to continue until sensors detected a low propellant level on the Centaur stage, ensuring the payload reached the best orbit possible.

The AEHF 6 satellite will use its own engine and plasma thrusters to maneuver into a circular geostationary orbit more than 22,000 miles over the equator, where the craft’s speed will match the rate of Earth’s rotation. That will allow AEHF 6 to remain over the same part of the world 24 hours per day.

Military officials have not disclosed the geographic coverage area for AEHF 6.

Designed to operate at least 14 years, the AEHF satellites are follow-ons to the Air Force’s Milstar satellite network.

Each of the AEHF satellites, which are spread around the world to enable global coverage, provides more capacity than the entire five-satellite Milstar constellation, which launched in the 1990s and 2000s. The AEHF satellites are cross-linked with one another, allowing the network to beam signals around the world without going through a ground station.

AEHF 6 will go straight into operations once it passes post-launch tests, Space Force officials said.

The AEHF satellites provide connectivity at different specified data rates between 75 bits per second to 8 megabits per second. Those data rates are slow by modern standards, but what distinguishes the AEHF satellites is their ability to resist jamming and continue operating, even in the event of nuclear war.

Each satellite also carries gimbaled dish antennas to reach users on-the-move, phased array antennas with beams can be steered electronically rather than mechanically, and nulling antennas to provide “extremely high anti-jam capability to in-theater users,” according to Northrop Grumman, supplier of the AEHF communications payload.

“AEHF, if we were to have to operate in (the highest bandwidth) mode, will enable the President of the United States, national leaders and four international allies to be able to communicate in voice-recognizable communication, even through any event,” Dukes said.

The governments of Australia, Canada, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom have joined the AEHF program.

“Across the globe, we have numerous Army, Navy, Air Force, and joint international partner terminals with the AEHF constellation online,” Dukes said. “We have enough bandwidth to service all the terminals in our concept of operations. So by upgrading from the Milstar to the AEHF constellation, we’re able to provide that capability from now to beyond 2030.”

Thursday’s launch went ahead amid the coronavirus pandemic, which has forced delays in many upcoming launches.

But the launch of the AEHF 6 satellite was deemed critical by military leaders.

“There are critical things or mission-essential things that the U.S. Department of Defense does every day, regardless of what the current global situation is,” said Lt. Gen. John “JT” Thompson, commander of the Space and Missile Systems Center at Los Angeles Air Force Base. “So even in the face of a global pandemic like the COVID-19 crisis, we must continue to perform mission-essential tasks.

“One of those mission-essential tasks, one of those things that we have to do for the warfighter and for the United States of America is launch AEHF 6,” Thompson said. “It is designated mission-essential, and it’s because the AEHF constellation supports the President of the United States, other national leaders and the joint forces with critical strategic communications around the planet.

“This particular launch extends that capability out into the timeframe beyond 2030,” Thompson said.

ULA says its next Atlas 5 launch is scheduled for May, when the next flight of the military’s X-37B spaceplane is scheduled for takeoff from Cape Canaveral.

https://spaceflightnow.com/2020/03/26/atlas-5-rocket-launch-caps-deployment-of-ultra-secure-military-communications-network/

Photos: Atlas 5 rocket rolls out to launch pad at Cape Canaveral
March 25, 2020 Stephen Clark




Credit: United Launch Alliance
https://spaceflightnow.com/2020/03/25/photos-atlas-5-rocket-rolls-out-to-launch-pad-at-cape-canaveral/

Here are some statistics on this morning's mission:

665th launch for Atlas program since 1957
367th Atlas launch from Cape Canaveral
254th mission of a Centaur upper stage
231st use of Centaur by an Atlas rocket
500th production RL10 engine to be launched
31st RL10C-1 engine launched
89th flight of an RD-180 main engine
119th-123rd AJ-60 solid rocket boosters flown
83rd launch of an Atlas 5 since 2002
31st U.S. Air Force/Space Force use of an Atlas 5
68th launch of an Atlas 5 from Cape Canaveral
2nd Atlas 5 launch of 2020
123rd Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle flight
138th United Launch Alliance flight overall
75th Atlas 5 under United Launch Alliance
98th United Launch Alliance flight from Cape Canaveral
53rd ULA launch for U.S. Air Force/Space Force
28th 500-series flight of the Atlas 5
11th Atlas 5 to fly in the 551 configuration
95th launch from Complex 41
68th Atlas 5 to use Complex 41
7th orbital launch overall from Cape Canaveral in 2020
https://spaceflightnow.com/2020/03/25/atlas-5-aehf-6-mission-status-center/
https://spaceflightnow.com/2020/03/26/atlas-5-launch-timeline-for-the-aehf-6-mission/

Final AEHF satellite mated to Atlas 5 launcher at Cape Canaveral
March 12, 2020 Stephen Clark


The first stage for the next Atlas 5 rocket launch was raised on ULA’s mobile launch platform Feb. 19. Credit: United Launch Alliance
https://spaceflightnow.com/2020/03/12/final-aehf-satellite-mated-to-atlas-5-launcher-at-cape-canaveral/

Military officials committed to keeping Cape Canaveral open for launches
March 24, 2020 Stephen Clark

The military-run Eastern Range at Cape Canaveral remains ready to support upcoming launches — including an Atlas 5 flight Thursday — amid the coronavirus pandemic, officials said Tuesday.

The next launch scheduled from Cape Canaveral is set to take off Thursday, when a United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket carries a U.S. Space Force communications satellite into orbit. Preparations for that mission are on schedule, officials said Tuesday. (...)
https://spaceflightnow.com/2020/03/24/military-officials-committed-to-keeping-cape-canaveral-open-for-launches/

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2020/03/atlas-v-launch-space-forces-aehf-6/

AEHF 6 (USA 295) https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/aehf-1.htm
TDO 2 https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/tdo.htm
« Ostatnia zmiana: Marzec 29, 2020, 03:24 wysłana przez Orionid »

Offline kanarkusmaximus

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« Odpowiedź #121 dnia: Marzec 27, 2020, 09:53 »
Jak na obecne problemy na całym świecie (z których wychodzą Chiny) - tyle startów w marcu to całkiem niezły wynik!

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« Odpowiedź #122 dnia: Marzec 28, 2020, 12:29 »
Starty kosmiczne w 2020  cz 1

Starty wg miesięcy:

I  7 (Chiny 3, SpaceX 2, Rocket Lab 1, Europa 1)
II 8+1 (15+1)  (Chiny 1, SpaceX 1, ULA 1, NG 1, Rosja 2, Europa 1, Japonia 1, Iran 1)
III 7+1 (22+1)  (Chiny 2+1, SpaceX 2, ULA 1, Rosja 2)

W skrócie:

Chiny                                             6 + 1                                                   
USA                                               8 (SpaceX 5, ULA 2, NG 1)                                                               
Nowa Zelandia (Rocket Lab)             1           
Rosja                                             4+0 z Kourou                                                   
Europa (bez europejskich Sojuzów)   2           
Japonia                                          1                                                 
Indie                                              0
Iran                                               1

Chiny

07.01.    CZ-3B/G2      Xichang
             TJS-5 GEO
15.01.    CZ-2D      Taiyuan LC9
             Jilin-1 Kuanfu-01
             ÑuSat-7 (37 kg)
             ÑuSat-8 (37 kg)
             Tianqi 5 (8 kg ?)
16.01.    KZ-1A      Jiuquan
             Yinhe-1 (227 kg)
19.02.    CZ-2D      Xichang LC3
              XJS C
              XJS D
              XJS E
              XJS F
09.03.    CZ-3B/G2      Xichang LC2
             Beidou-3 G2Q (4600 kg) GEO
16.03.   CZ-7A      Wenchang LC201
            XJY-6

24.03.   CZ-2C      Xichang
            Yaogan 30-06-01 (CX 5-16)
            Yaogan 30-06-02 (CX 5-17)
            Yaogan 30-06-03 (CX 5-18)
             

USA

SpaceX

07.01.    Falcon-9R      Canaveral SLC-40
             Starlink v1.0 2-1 (Starlink 1066) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-2 (Starlink 1069) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-3 (Starlink 1070) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-4 (Starlink 1071) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-5 (Starlink 1072) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-6 (Starlink 1073) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-7 (Starlink 1074) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-8 (Starlink 1075) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-9 (Starlink 1076) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-10 (Starlink 1077) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-11 (Starlink 1078) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-12 (Starlink 1079) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-13 (Starlink 1080) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-14 (Starlink 1081) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-15 (Starlink 1082) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-16 (Starlink 1083) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-17 (Starlink 1084) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-18 (Starlink 1085) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-19 (Starlink 1086) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-20 (Starlink 1087) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-21 (Starlink 1088) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-22 (Starlink 1089) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-23 (Starlink 1090) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-24 (Starlink 1091) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-25 (Starlink 1092) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-26 (Starlink 1093) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-27 (Starlink 1094) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-28 (Starlink 1095) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-29 (Starlink 1096) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-30 (Starlink 1097) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-31 (Starlink 1098) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-32 (Starlink 1099) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-33 (Starlink 1100) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-34 (Starlink 1101) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-35 (Starlink 1102) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-36 (Starlink 1103) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-37 (Starlink 1104) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-38 (Starlink 1106) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-39 (Starlink 1107) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-40 (Starlink 1108) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-41 (Starlink 1109) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-42 (Starlink 1110) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-43 (Starlink 1111) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-44 (Starlink 1112) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-45 (Starlink 1113) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-46 (Starlink 1114) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-47 (Starlink 1115) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-48 (Starlink 1116) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-49 (Starlink 1117) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-50 (Starlink 1118) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-51 (Starlink 1119) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-52 (Starlink 1121) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-53 (Starlink 1122) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-54 (Starlink 1123) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-55 (Starlink 1124) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-56 (Starlink 1125) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-57 (Starlink 1126) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-58 (Starlink 1128) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-59 (Starlink 1130, Darksat) (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 2-60 (Starlink 1144) (~260 kg)
29.01.    Falcon-9R      Canaveral SLC-40
             Starlink v1.0 3-1 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-2 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-3 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-4 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-5 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-6 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-7 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-8 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-9 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-10 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-11 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-12 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-13 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-14 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-15 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-16 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-17 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-18 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-19 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-20 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-21 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-22 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-23 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-24 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-25 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-26 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-27 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-28 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-29 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-30 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-31 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-32 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-33 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-34 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-35 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-36 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-37 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-38 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-39 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-40 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-41 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-42 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-43 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-44 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-45 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-46 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-47 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-48 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-49 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-50 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-51 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-52 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-53 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-54 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-55 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-56 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-57 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-58 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-59 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 3-60 (~260 kg)

17.02.    Falcon-9R       Canaveral SLC-40
             Starlink v1.0 4-1 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-2 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-3 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-4 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-5 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-6 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-7 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-8 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-9 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-10 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-11 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-12 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-13 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-14 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-15 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-16 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-17 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-18 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-19 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-20 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-21 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-22 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-23 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-24 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-25 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-26 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-27 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-28 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-29 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-30 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-31 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-32 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-33 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-34 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-35 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-36 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-37 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-38 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-39 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-40 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-41 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-42 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-43 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-44 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-45 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-46 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-47 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-48 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-49 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-50 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-51 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-52 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-53 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-54 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-55 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-56 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-57 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-58 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-59 (~260 kg)
             Starlink v1.0 4-60 (~260 kg)   
07.03.   Falcon-9R      Canaveral SLC-40
            Dragon CRS-20 (SpX 20, Dragon C112-F3)
            Bartolomeo (CEPHFISS) ⇑
            iSIM ⇑
            Lynk 4 ⇑
            G-Satellite ↑
            Quetzal 1 (Guatesat 1) ↑ (1 kg)
18.03.   Falcon-9R      KSC LC-39A
            Starlink v1.0 5-1 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-2 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-3 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-4 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-5 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-6 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-7 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-8 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-9 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-10 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-11 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-12 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-13 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-14 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-15 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-16 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-17 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-18 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-19 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-20 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-21 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-22 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-23 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-24 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-25 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-26 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-27 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-28 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-29 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-30 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-31 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-32 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-33 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-34 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-35 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-36 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-37 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-38 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-39 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-40 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-41 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-42 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-43 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-44 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-45 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-46 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-47 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-48 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-49 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-50 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-51 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-52 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-53 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-54 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-55 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-56 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-57 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-58 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-59 (~260 kg)
            Starlink v1.0 5-60 (~260 kg)

ULA

10.02.    Atlas-5/411      Canaveral SLC-41
             SolO (1800 kg) orbita heliocentryczna
26.03.   Atlas-5/551      Canaveral SLC-41
            AEHF 6 (USA 298) (6168 kg) GEO
            TDO-2


Northrop Grumman

15.02.    Antares-230+      Wallops LP-0A
             Cygnus NG-13     

Nowa Zelandia
Rocket Lab (amerykańska spółka z nowozelandzką spółką zależną)

31.01.    Electron/Curie      Onenui LC1
             NRO L-151

Online Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 11781
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Starty rakiet (I kwartał 2020 roku)
« Odpowiedź #123 dnia: Marzec 28, 2020, 12:32 »
Starty kosmiczne w 2020  cz 2

Rosja

06.02.    Sojuz-2.1b/Fregat-M      Bajkonur 31/PU-6
             OneWeb L2 1 (OneWeb 0013) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 2 (OneWeb 0017) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 3 (OneWeb 0020) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 4 (OneWeb 0021) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 5 (OneWeb 0022) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 6 (OneWeb 0023) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 7 (OneWeb 0024) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 8 (OneWeb 0025) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 9 (OneWeb 0026) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 10 (OneWeb 0028) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 11 (OneWeb 0032) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 12 (OneWeb 0033) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 13 (OneWeb 0035) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 14 (OneWeb 0036) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 15 (OneWeb 0038) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 16 (OneWeb 0039) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 17 (OneWeb 0040) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 18 (OneWeb 0041) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 19 (OneWeb 0043) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 20 (OneWeb 0044) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 21 (OneWeb 0045) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 22 (OneWeb 0047) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 23 (OneWeb 0048) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 24 (OneWeb 0049) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 25 (OneWeb 0051) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 26 (OneWeb 0052) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 27 (OneWeb 0053) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 28 (OneWeb 0054) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 29 (OneWeb 0056) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 30 (OneWeb 0057) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 31 (OneWeb 0058) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 32 (OneWeb 0059) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 33 (OneWeb 0062) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L2 34 (OneWeb 0065) (147 kg)
20.02.    Sojuz-2.1a/Fregat       Plesieck 43/PU-3
             Kosmos 2545 (Meridian-M 9) (> 2000 kg)
16.03.   Sojuz-2.1b/Fregat      Plesieck 43/PU-4
            Kosmos 2545 (Uragan-M #51, GLONASS-M №760) (1415 kg)
21.03.   Sojuz-2.1b/Fregat-M      Bajkonur 31/PU-6
             OneWeb L3 1 (OneWeb 0013) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 2 (OneWeb 0017) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 3 (OneWeb 0020) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 4 (OneWeb 0021) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 5 (OneWeb 0022) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 6 (OneWeb 0023) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 7 (OneWeb 0024) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 8 (OneWeb 0025) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 9 (OneWeb 0026) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 10 (OneWeb 0028) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 11 (OneWeb 0032) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 12 (OneWeb 0033) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 13 (OneWeb 0035) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 14 (OneWeb 0036) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 15 (OneWeb 0038) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 16 (OneWeb 0039) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 17 (OneWeb 0040) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 18 (OneWeb 0041) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 19 (OneWeb 0043) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 20 (OneWeb 0044) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 21 (OneWeb 0045) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 22 (OneWeb 0047) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 23 (OneWeb 0048) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 24 (OneWeb 0049) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 25 (OneWeb 0051) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 26 (OneWeb 0052) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 27 (OneWeb 0053) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 28 (OneWeb 0054) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 29 (OneWeb 0056) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 30 (OneWeb 0057) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 31 (OneWeb 0058) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 32 (OneWeb 0059) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 33 (OneWeb 0062) (147 kg)
             OneWeb L3 34 (OneWeb 0065) (147 kg)

Rosja  (Arianespace)

Europa

16.01.   KZ-1A      Jiuquan
             Eutelsat Konnect (3619 kg) GEO
             GSAT-30 (3357 kg) GEO
18.02.    Ariane-5ECA+      Kourou ELA-3
             JCSat-17 (5857 kg) GEO
             GEO-KOMPSAT-2B (3379 kg) GEO

Japonia

09.02.    H-2A (202)      Tanegashima Y/LP-2
             IGS Optical-7           


Indie


Iran

09.02.    Simorgh    Semnan LC2
             Zafar-1
(113 kg)

2017
2018
2019