Autor Wątek: Kalendarium historycznych wydarzeń  (Przeczytany 45283 razy)

0 użytkowników i 2 Gości przegląda ten wątek.

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9754
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Kalendarium historycznych wydarzeń
« Odpowiedź #300 dnia: Luty 08, 2019, 07:06 »
Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum@IntrepidMuseum 7 lut 2019

.@NASA's Day of Remembrance honors the 17 astronauts who died in the agency's three tragedies — Apollo 1 in 1967, Challenger in 1986, & Columbia in 2003. Today the #IntrepidMuseum joins the NASA community in remembering those we lost. #NASARemembers
https://twitter.com/IntrepidMuseum/status/1093566314466238464

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9754
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Kalendarium historycznych wydarzeń
« Odpowiedź #301 dnia: Luty 08, 2019, 07:15 »
NASA@NASA  7 lut 2019

Dziś # NASARemembers nasze upadłe pionierów lotów kosmicznych jak @ VP Mike Pence & Administrator @ JimBridenstine wizyty @ ArlingtonNatl cmentarz z członków rodzin naszych utraconych przyjaciół i współpracowników. Aby zapoznać się z listą pomników NASA i pochówków w Arlington, odwiedź:https://go.nasa.gov/2MVOi7F
https://twitter.com/NASA/status/



Vice President Mike Pence@VP 7 lut 2019

Honored to join families & friends of the crew members of Apollo 1, Challenger & Columbia at @NASA’s Day of Remembrance to pay tribute to the heroic men & women who lost their lives leading in America’s journey to the stars. We honor them & we resolve to continue their work.
https://twitter.com/VP/status/1093627583659474944


Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9754
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Kalendarium historycznych wydarzeń
« Odpowiedź #302 dnia: Luty 08, 2019, 07:24 »
Vice President Attends NASA Day of Remembrance
Feb. 7, 2019

Vice President Mike Pence visits the Space Shuttle Challenger Memorial with June Scobee-Rodgers, widow of Challenger Commander Dick Scobee, right, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, left, and Chuck Resnik, brother of Challenger Mission Specialist Judith Resnik, second left, after a wreath laying ceremony that was part of NASA's Day of Remembrance, Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019, at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va. Wreaths were laid in memory of those men and women who lost their lives in the quest for space exploration.

Image Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani
https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/vice-president-attends-nasa-day-of-remembrance

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9754
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Kalendarium historycznych wydarzeń
« Odpowiedź #303 dnia: Luty 08, 2019, 07:53 »
Armstrong Remembers Pilots Who Lost Their Lives Doing What They Love
Feb. 7, 2019
Christian Gelzer, NASA Armstrong Historian

NASA will honor members of the NASA family who lost their lives while furthering the cause of exploration and discovery, including the crews of Apollo 1 and space shuttles Challenger and Columbia, during the agency's annual Day of Remembrance Thursday, Feb. 7.

In addition, NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center in California will recognize the loss of four pilots who died at the controls of a NASA, formally known as National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), aircraft.

“On this solemn day, we want to pay tribute to the pilots who were pursuing the agency’s mission of advancing the technical boundaries of aviation through flight as well as recognize the sacrifice of the families of the deceased,” said David McBride, Armstrong center director.


Howard C. “Tick” Lilly was the first NACA engineering pilot assigned to the Muroc Flight Test Unit, now known as NASA Armstrong. He also was the first pilot who died on a research mission. Credits: NACA / NASA

Howard C. “Tick” Lilly became the first NACA engineering pilot assigned to the Muroc Flight Test Unit, now known as NASA Armstrong. He served as a Naval aviator before joining the NACA’s Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in Virginia in 1942. In 1943 he transferred to the NACA’s Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory in Cleveland (renamed Glenn Research Center) and then to the NACA’s Muroc unit in 1947.

There he flew the Douglas D-558-1 transonic research aircraft and the Bell X-1. Lilly was the fourth person to exceed the speed of sound. He died May 3,1948, when components of the D-558-1’s engine compressor failed, severing control cables, causing the airplane to crash. He was the first NACA pilot to die in the line of duty.


Joseph A. “Joe” Walker piloted such aircraft as the X-15. He died during a mission piloting the F-104.Credits: NASA

Joseph A. “Joe” Walker was a chief research pilot at the NASA Flight Research Center (NASA Armstrong) during the mid-1960s. Walker flew P-38 aircraft for the Army Air Force in North Africa during World War II. He joined the NACA’s Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory in Ohio in 1945 and transferred to the High-Speed Flight Research Station in 1951.

Walker made the first NASA-piloted X-15 flight March 25, 1960, and flew the aircraft 24 times, achieving its highest altitude (354,300 ft.) Aug. 22, 1963. He made the first flight in the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle in 1964 that led to the Lunar Landing Training Vehicle used in Houston to train astronauts to land on the moon. Walker perished June 8, 1966, when his F-104 was caught in the wingtip vortex of the North American XB-70.


Richard E. “Dick” Gray, seen above with the AD-1 oblique wing experimental aircraft, lost his life during a pilot proficiency flight.Credits: NASA

In 1982, Richard E. “Dick” Gray was killed on a pilot proficiency flight while flying for NASA Armstrong. Gray joined NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, in 1978 after completing his service in the U.S. Navy. He flew 48 combat missions in F-4s over Vietnam while assigned to squadron VF-111 aboard the USS Coral Sea in 1972.

After joining Kennedy Space Center in Florida, he flew as chief project pilot on the WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft and served as the prime chase pilot in the T-38 aircraft for video documentation of the landing portion of space shuttle orbital flight tests.

He was fatally injured Nov. 8, 1982, in the crash of a Cessna T-37 aircraft while on a flight to hone his skills flying the airplane.


Michael J. “Mike” Adams, Major Air Force pilot, stands in front of X-15#1, on Rogers Dry Lake on Edwards Air Force Base in California, after a flight. Adams died when the rocket plane disintegrated following reentry and crashed. Credits: NASA

Air Force pilot Major Michael J. Adams was selected in 1962 for the Experimental Test Pilot School at Edwards Air Force Base in California. He also was one of four Edwards Aerospace research pilots to participate in a series of NASA moon landing practice tests.

Adams joined the joint USAF/NASA X-15 program in July 1966 and flew seven flights. On his last flight Nov. 15, 1967, Adams died when the rocket plane disintegrated following reentry and crashed. An investigation concluded that the distraction of malfunctioning systems, coupled with possible vertigo, led to the accident.

He was flying the 191st flight of the X-15 program, his first suborbital mission. Adams was the 27th American to fly more than 50 miles above the Earth's surface and was awarded astronaut wings posthumously. His accident was the only fatality of the 199-flight program. His name was added to the Astronauts Memorial at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., and a memorial was established at the crash site in 2004.

https://www.nasa.gov/centers/armstrong/features/remembering-afrc-pilots.html

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9754
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Kalendarium historycznych wydarzeń
« Odpowiedź #304 dnia: Luty 08, 2019, 23:20 »
Op-ed | Remembering America’s lost space pioneers
by Mike Pence — February 7, 2019


Vice President Mike Pence visits the Space Shuttle Challenger Memorial with June Scobee-Rodgers, widow of Challenger Commander Dick Scobee, right, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, left, and Chuck Resnik, brother of Challenger Mission Specialist Judith Resnik, second left, after a wreath laying ceremony that was part of NASA's Day of Remembrance ceremony Feb. 7 at Arlington National Cemetery. Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani

Today is the NASA Day of Remembrance, an opportunity for Americans everywhere to reflect on the service of the men and women of NASA who helped lead our nation into the heavens and never came home.

We are inspired by all those who have dedicated their time and talent to exploring the universe, discovering the mysteries of creation, and pushing the boundaries of human potential. But on this occasion, we pay special tribute to the heroic sacrifice of those who have lost their lives throughout our ascent into the stars.

They include some of our nation’s first pioneers in space, the crew of Apollo 1. More than 50 years after the heartbreaking accident that claimed their lives, Gus Grissom, Ed White and Roger Chaffee live on as giants in the history of space exploration. Their sacrifice laid the foundation for the first successful moon landing just two years later, and their legacy has inspired the American people ever since.

We also remember those who perished aboard the Space Shuttle Challenger. The loss of those “seven star voyagers” was a reminder of both the danger that our astronauts encounter and the dauntless courage they demonstrate in its face.

And we recall those lost in the most recent American spaceflight tragedy, the men and women of the Space Shuttle Columbia. Their tragic accident just minutes before landing grieved the nation, but the example of teamwork and dedication they set and the legacy they left behind united our country in shared resolve to continue their work.

Each of these heroes knew the risks. Yet each of them chose to answer the call to serve, going above and beyond what was asked of them and, in the end, making that ultimate sacrifice. So while we mourn their loss, we also honor their memories by continuing the mission for which they gave the last full measure of devotion, and by working harder, building bigger, and venturing further than ever before.

The men and women of NASA, and all who work in America’s space industry, have no greater ally than President Donald Trump. As he’s said, we are “reclaiming America’s heritage as the world’s greatest space-faring nation.” And from day one, we’ve taken decisive action to make good on that promise.

In our first year, after laying dormant for nearly a quarter-century, the President relaunched the National Space Council to coordinate our nation’s space activities and bring the full force of our national interest to bear on space-related decisions. And it’s my great honor to serve as the Council’s Chairman.

Not long afterwards, the President signed Space Policy Directive-1. This directs NASA to send American astronauts back to the moon to establish the capacity to put American boots on the face of Mars.

We’ve also recognized that the red tape of today hinders the success of tomorrow, so we’re empowering America’s commercial space industry by transforming the licensing and regulatory systems that oversee launch, re-entry, and space operations. By unleashing our private partners, we will discover new opportunities, develop new technologies and achieve greater success than ever before.

But we know that security is the foundation of prosperity, and as President Trump has stated clearly, space is “a war-fighting domain, just like the land, air, and sea.” So to meet the emerging threats on this new battlefield, we have begun to establish a sixth branch of our military: the United States Space Force. In space, as on Earth, we will always seek peace. But history proves that peace only comes through strength, and the Space Force will be our strength in space.

Our goals for the future are only possible because of the sacrifice of those who have gone before. So 50 years after the world marveled as three brave young astronauts flew a quarter of a million miles and planted our flag on the face of the moon, we must recommit ourselves to upholding their legacy and restoring American leadership in space.

And we will honor the service and sacrifice of all those who have given their lives for the sake of that cause by embracing the challenges that lie ahead and building a brighter future for all.

 Mike Pence is Vice President of the United States of America.

https://spacenews.com/op-ed-remembering-americas-lost-space-pioneers/

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9754
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Kalendarium historycznych wydarzeń
« Odpowiedź #305 dnia: Luty 08, 2019, 23:21 »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O1S35OrLwTg" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O1S35OrLwTg</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O1S35OrLwTg

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9754
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Kalendarium historycznych wydarzeń
« Odpowiedź #306 dnia: Luty 15, 2019, 21:15 »
Gemini 8 – ważny etap “wyścigu na Księżyc”
BY KRZYSZTOF KANAWKA ON 15 LUTEGO 2019


Gemini 8 po zakończeniu misji / Credits - NASA

W marcu 1966 roku odbyła się misja załogowa Gemini 8. Jej nieoczekiwany przebieg był ważnym etapem w “wyścigu na Księżyc”.

W tym roku będziemy świętować pięćdziesięciolecie pierwszego lądowania człowieka na Księżycu. Zanim jednak Neil Armstrong postawił stopę na Srebrnym Globie, odbyło się kilka misji, które miały duże znaczenie dla sukcesu programu Apollo. Jedną z tych misji był lot Gemini 8 – pierwszy lot orbitalny Neila Armstronga.

Misja Gemini 8 była planowana na trzy dni. Najważniejszym elementem tego lotu była seria połączeń z bezzałogowym pojazdem Agena. Pojazd Agena został zbudowany, by przetestować działania takie jak wspólne działania na orbicie, cumowanie dwóch pojazdów oraz zmiany orbit. Te wszystkie działania musiały być opanowane w dobrym stopniu jeszcze przed rozpoczęciem programu Apollo.


Załoga Gemini 8 – David Scott i Neil Armstrong / Credits – NASA

Gemini 8 – z załogą w składzie Neil Armstrong i David Scott – wystartował 16 marca 1966 o godzinie 16:41 UTC. Sześć godzin i 33 minuty później Gemini 8 przycumował do Ageny. Było to pierwsze udane cumowanie w przestrzeni kosmicznej – ważny krok w “wyścigu na Księżyc”, gdyż każda misja księżycowa wymagała serii cumowań różnych pojazdów.

Zaledwie 27 minut później pojawił się poważny problem, który wymógł przerwanie misji. W systemie manewrowym pojazdu Gemini pojawił się problem, który spowodował zużycie pokładowego paliwa oraz coraz szybszy ruch zestawu Gemini-Agena.

Początkowo kontrola misji zakładała, że problem pojawił się w Agenie, zatem postanowiono rozłączyć oba obiekty. Jak się szybko okazało – problem był po stronie kapsuły Gemini, która po odcumowaniu zaczęła obracać się coraz szybciej. Jedynie dzięki szybkim reakcjom astronautów udało się zapobiec całkowitej kontroli nad kapsułą. Następnie zapadła decyzja o przerwaniu misji i po zaledwie 10 godzinach i 41 minutach od startu Gemini 8 wodował w Pacyfiku. Załoga została podjęta przez okręt amerykańskiej Marynarki Wojennej.

Poniższe nagranie prezentuje raport NASA z misji Gemini 8.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eb_6UhAHCow" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eb_6UhAHCow</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eb_6UhAHCow

Misja Gemini 8 – raport NASA – nagranie z 1966 roku / Credits – NASA

Co ciekawe, nie udało się w pełni wyjaśnić przyczyn awarii w systemie manewrowym Gemini 8. Późniejsze kapsuły Gemini miały zmodyfikowany układ elektryczny, co zapobiegło podobnym awariom. Zmieniono także procedury testów naziemnych przed startem – w późniejszych misjach praktyką stało się poszerzone testowanie sprzętu.

Misja Gemini 8 była przykładem trudności, z jakimi zmagały się pierwsze loty załogowe. Większość technologii i procedur wówczas nie było opracowanych, a margines błędu był bardzo niewielki. Z pewnością jednak doświadczenia Gemini 8 pozwoliły na poprawienie procedur cumowania na orbicie oraz funkcjonowania dwóch pojazdów – zarówno oddzielnie, jak i wspólnie.

Warto jednak tu dodać, że doświadczenia wyniesione z Gemini 8 nie zapobiegły kolejnym awariom, a nawet katastrofom. Mniej niż rok później, 27 stycznia 1967 roku, doszło do tragicznego pożaru Apollo 1. W kwietniu 1970 roku doszło zaś do poważnej awarii w trakcie misji Apollo 13. Pierwsze loty załogowe były zawsze wyprawą w nieznane – nawet podczas naziemnych testów.

Neil Armstrong, uczestnik misji Gemini 8 oraz pierwszy człowiek na Księżycu, zmarł 25 sierpnia 2012 roku.

(NASA)
https://kosmonauta.net/2019/02/gemini-8-wazny-etap-wyscigu-na-ksiezyc/

Artykuły astronautyczne

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9754
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Kalendarium historycznych wydarzeń
« Odpowiedź #307 dnia: Luty 20, 2019, 11:30 »
W tym miesiącu minęło 25 lat od pierwszego wspólnego lotu amerykańsko- rosyjskiego od czasu wyprawy Sojuz- Apollo z 1975 r. Misją STS-60
Discovery
dowodził Charles Bolden będący jednym  z 14. Afroamerykańskich astronautów, których NASA wysłałą na orbitę.

Black History Month: Looking Back, Looking Forward at the Contributions of African-American Astronauts
By Ben Evans, on February 17th, 2019


Charlie Bolden, pictured at the commander’s station on STS-60 in February 1994. This flight, 25 years ago, saw the first joint U.S.-Russian participation in manned space exploration since the Apollo-Soyuz era. Bolden went on to become NASA’s first African-American administrator. Photo Credit: NASA

Twenty-five years ago, this month, an African-American astronaut commanded one of the most pivotal missions in U.S. spaceflight history. Charlie Bolden—veteran of three previous flights, including the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)—led the crew of shuttle Discovery on an eight-day mission whose primary objective was scientific research and satellite deployment and retrieval. In this sense, STS-60 closely mirrored many previous flights of the shuttle era.

But for Bolden, who would go on to become the first African-American administrator of NASA (under the leadership of the first African-American President), it marked a milestone, for it included both Russian and U.S. crew members for the first time since the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP). In commanding STS-60, Bolden was not only forging a path to future co-operation with Russia, but was also continuing a long line of contributions made by African-American astronauts in space. (...)

Throughout February, as the United States observes Black History Month, we are reminded not only of Bolden’s accomplishment, but of all 14 African-Americans who spent time in space between August 1983 and March 2011. And we are reminded of those who will follow in their footsteps, including Victor Glover, currently training for the first dedicated crew-exchange mission aboard SpaceX’s Crew Dragon, later this year.

And, of course, we are reminded of those who strived for space, but never made it home: Challenger’s Ron McNair, Columbia’s Mike Anderson and Manned Orbiting Laboratory (MOL) astronaut Bob Lawrence, who—had the hands of fate turned with greater kindness—might have become the first African-American to fly into space and maybe even the first black Space Shuttle commander.

https://www.americaspace.com/2019/02/17/black-history-month-looking-back-looking-forward-at-the-contributions-of-african-american-astronauts/
http://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=1306.msg128780#msg128780
« Ostatnia zmiana: Luty 20, 2019, 11:57 wysłana przez Orionid »

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9754
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Kalendarium historycznych wydarzeń
« Odpowiedź #308 dnia: Luty 20, 2019, 12:47 »
35 lat minęło od rozpoczęcia rekordowej wówczas wyprawy kosmonautów na pokładzie Sojuza T-10.

Успех «Союза Т-10»
08 февраля 2019



35 лет назад, 8 февраля 1984 года, был выведен на орбиту пилотируемый космический корабль «Союз Т-10» с экипажем в составе Леонида Кизима (командир), Владимира Соловьёва (бортинженер) и Олега Атькова (космонавт-исследователь). Это была третья основная экспедиция орбитальной научной станции «Салют-7», которая с ноября 1983 года находилась в автоматическом режиме полёта. Впервые спустя 13 лет на станцию отправился основной экипаж из трёх человек.



Стоит отметить, что успешному запуску корабля «Союз Т-10» предшествовало несколько неудач. Третьей основной экспедицией на «Салют-7» должен был стать экипаж в составе командира корабля Владимира Титова и бортинженера Геннадия Стрекалова. Но за 48 секунд до старта «Союза Т-10-1» произошло возгорание топлива ракеты-носителя. С помощью системы аварийного спасения спускаемый аппарат с экипажем был отделён от ракеты и благополучно приземлился на парашюте на безопасном расстоянии. В истории космонавтики это был единственный случай, когда отстрел спасательной капсулы с космонавтами произошёл на стартовом столе. Жертв во время аварии не было, но космонавты испытали сильные перегрузки, к счастью, без последствий для здоровья.

До происшествия с «Союзом Т-10-1» Владимир Титов и Александр Серебров в составе экипажа «Союз Т-8» уже пытались произвести стыковку со станцией «Салют-7», однако помешала техническая неисправность: в момент сброса головного обтекателя ракеты-носителя, была повреждена антенна автоматической системы сближения «Игла».



Каждый полёт в космос – проверка на прочность не только техники, но и человеческих ресурсов. Главное, что удалось остановить серию неудач в советской космической отрасли, и 9 февраля 1984 года «Союз Т-10» успешно состыковался с орбитальной научной станцией «Салют-7», на борту которой экипаж провёл ряд важных научно-технических и медико-биологических исследований и экспериментов.

Во время пребывания на станции «Салют-7» третьей основной экспедиции были приняты две экспедиции посещения – на кораблях «Союз Т-11» и «Союз Т-12», проводились стыковка и перестыковка с пятью транспортными кораблями. Впервые на борту орбитальной станции работали одновременно шесть космонавтов. Врач-кардиолог Олег Атьков проводил регулярные медицинские обследования коллег по экипажу.

Леонид Кизим и Владимир Соловьёв во время одного полёта совершили шесть выходов в открытый космос. Суммарное время пребывания в открытом космосе составило 22 часа 50 минут. Проведён ремонт объединённой двигательной установки станции и установлены ещё две дополнительные солнечные батареи. В ходе экспедиции посещения в открытом космосе впервые работала женщина-космонавт Светлана Савицкая (вместе с Владимиром Джанибековым).



Космонавты Леонид Кизим, Владимир Соловьёв и Олег Атьков вернулись на Землю 2 октября 1984 года. Продолжительность их полёта составила 236 суток 22 часа 49 минут, что являлось рекордом по тем временам.

http://www.gctc.ru/main.php?id=4502

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9754
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Kalendarium historycznych wydarzeń
« Odpowiedź #309 dnia: Luty 26, 2019, 07:00 »
40 lat temu 25 lutego 1979 roku rozpoczęła się , rekordowa wtedy,  175-dniowa misja  z udziałem Władimira Lachowa i Walerego Riumina. Mieli zaplanowane spotkania z dwoma międzynarodowymi załogami, które nie doszły do skutku. Z powodu niemożności dokowania Sojuza 33, Sojuz-32 wrócił w trybie bezzałogowym na Ziemię, a Sojuz 34 wystartował bez załogi na pokładzie, jako pojazd powrotny załogi. W historii astronautyki jedyny raz doszło do sytuacji, kiedy pojazdy załogowe tylko w jednym kierunku odbyły loty kosmiczne z załogą.
W 1979 roku była to jedyna załoga przebywająca na pokładzie Saluta-6 i jednocześnie najbardziej samotna spośród długich wypraw w latach 70. i 80. XX wieku. Namiastką kontaktów z ludżmi był, po raz pierwszy dostarczony wtedy na stację orbitalną Salut 6 przez Progressa-5,  telewizor umożliwiający dwustronny wizualny kontakt  z Ziemią.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0fHe9rQiw5k" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0fHe9rQiw5k</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0fHe9rQiw5k

Юбилей легендарного полёта Владимира Ляхова и Валерия Рюмина
25 февраля 2019

25 февраля 1979 года, ровно сорок лет назад, 25 февраля 1979 года, ровно сорок лет назад, Владимир Ляхов и Валерий Рюмин на космическом корабле (КК) «Союз-32» начали свой легендарный полёт.Владимир Ляхов и Валерий Рюмин на космическом корабле (КК) «Союз-32» начали свой легендарный полёт.



Это была первая «космическая Одиссея» для Владимира Афанасьевича и второй старт для Валерия Викторовича. Первый, 7 октября 1977 года, в качестве бортинженера КК «Союз-25», прошёл для Рюмина неудачно. Программа 96-суточного полёта была не выполнена, так как стыковку с орбитальной станцией не удалось осуществить ни в автоматическом, ни в ручном режимах. Экипаж вернулся на Землю досрочно 11 октября 1977 года.



26 февраля 1979 года КК «Союз-32» с В.А. Ляховым и В.В. Рюминым на борту успешно пристыковался к орбитальной станции (ОС) «Салют-6». Космонавты приступили к выполнению программы полёта. Начались ремонтные работы, пришлось даже поработать паяльником (впервые это произошло в космосе 8 марта). Параллельно с ремонтными работами космонавты выполняли обширную программу научных исследований. Валерий Викторович и Владимир Афанасьевич даже посадили овощи и землянику.

14 марта прибыл грузовой корабль «Прогресс-5» и среди прочего привёз телевизор (диагональ 28 см). Впервые была создана двусторонняя телевизионная связь «Земля-станция-Земля». Теперь космонавты могли не только слышать, но и видеть тех, кто приходил в ЦУП – их семьи и даже Леонида Утёсова, который был на сеансе связи с космонавтами.

Намеченные экспедиции посещения станции двумя международными экипажами с космонавтами Болгарии и Венгрии не состоялись. В.В. Рюмин и В.А. Ляхов работали на орбите за себя и «за того парня», выполняя также эксперименты, запланированные международным экипажем.




13 июня «Союз-32» был отстыкован и в автоматическом режиме вернулся на Землю, доставив специалистам результаты экспериментов за 109 суток полёта.

30 июня 1979 года очередной грузовой корабль «Прогресс-7» доставил на борт радиотелескоп КРТ-10. На стыковочном узле Владимир Ляхов и Валерий Рюмин установили устройство выдвижения зеркала телескопа, и 18 июля при отходе «Прогресса-7» оно раскрылось. До 9 августа экипаж успешно занимался радиоастрономией, потом стали собираться домой. Оставалось только освободить «хвостовой» стыковочный узел, отстрелив антенну телескопа. Антенна дёрнулась, но не отошла от станции, зацепившись за внешние элементы конструкции «Салюта-6».

Космонавты отложили посадку и стали готовиться к незапланированному выходу в открытый космос. На 171-е сутки полёта они вышли в открытый космос. Валерий Рюмин специальными кусачками перекусил зацепившиеся тросики. Владимир Ляхов его страховал. Потом с помощью полутораметровой палки инженер оттолкнул злополучную антенну.




Длительность выхода составила 1 час 23 минуты. На обратном пути космонавты сняли с поверхности образцы материалов, экспонировавшихся два года в открытом космосе, а В.В. Рюмин даже не забыл салфеткой собрать пыль с иллюминатора. На следующий день Валерий Рюмин отметил на орбите свой 40-летний юбилей.

15 августа 1977 года «Союз-34» на борту с Владимиром Афанасьевичем Ляховым и Валерием Викторовичем Рюминым благополучно вернулся на Землю. На тот период это был самый длительный полёт, продолжительность которого составила 175 суток.

Указом Президиума Верховного Совета СССР от 19 августа 1979 года за мужество и героизм, проявленные в полёте, Валерию Рюмину и Владимиру Ляхову были присвоены звания Героев Советского Союза с вручением ордена Ленина и медали «Золотая Звезда».




http://www.gctc.ru/main.php?id=4532

















http://www.spacefacts.de/english/bio_cosm.htm
« Ostatnia zmiana: Luty 26, 2019, 18:28 wysłana przez Orionid »

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9754
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Kalendarium historycznych wydarzeń
« Odpowiedź #310 dnia: Marzec 01, 2019, 21:37 »
20 lat temu, 20 lutego 1999 w 13 rocznicę, wg czasu moskiewskiego,  wyniesienia na orbitę stacji kosmicznej Mir oraz w 37 rocznicę pierwszego załogowego lotu orbitalnego Amerykanina,  rozpoczął swój kilkudniowy lot kosmiczny pierwszy słowacki kosmonauta Ivan Bella, startując na orbitę m. in. z Siergiejem Awdiejewem , który przed 20 laty został rekordzistą pod względem skumulowanego czasu lotu. Słowak wrócił na Ziemię z Giennadijem Padałką, dla którego był to wtedy pierwszy pobyt w kosmosie, a od 2015 roku to on właśnie jest rekordzistą pod względem nalotu.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p3c4Av_pwec" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p3c4Av_pwec</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p3c4Av_pwec

Военный экипаж «Союза ТМ-29»
28 февраля 2019



Двадцать лет назад, 28 февраля 1999 года, первый словацкий космонавт Иван Белла вместе с российским космонавтом Геннадием Падалкой благополучно вернулся на Землю на космическом корабле «Союз ТМ-28». Продолжительность полёта Ивана Беллы составила 7 суток 21 час 56 минут, но за этот короткий срок была выполнена вся словацкая программа «Штефаник».



20 февраля 1999 года, в день 13-летия запуска базового блока станции «Мир», успешно стартовал «Союз ТМ-29» с интернациональным экипажем на борту (позывной «Дербент»). Командиром корабля был опытный российский космонавт Виктор Афанасьев, совершивший уже два длительных полёта на станцию; бортинженером – французский астронавт Жан-Пьер Эньере, для которого это была вторая экспедиция на орбитальную станцию (ОС) «Мир», а космонавтом-исследователем – Иван Белла, благодаря которому Словакия стала 29-й страной, отправившей своего гражданина в космос. Впервые на «Мир» полетели трое военных. И первый раз из трёх человек экипажа был всего один россиянин.



22 февраля 1999 года «Союз ТМ-29» состыковался с ОС «Мир», на которой работал экипаж ЭО-26 Геннадий Падалка и Сергей Авдеев. В российско-словацкую программу исследований входил, в частности, эксперимент «Эндотест» для Института медико-биологических проблем РАН и Словацкой академии наук. Его целью являлось определение нейроэндокринных и других физических функций космонавта при различных видах нагрузки с целью выяснения стрессогенного действия микрогравитации на организм человека.



Ещё одним интересным экспериментом стало выведение птенцов японского перепела. «Дербенты» взяли с собой на «Мир» шесть десятков яиц, уже инкубированных на Земле 13-14 суток. На станции их заложили в инкубатор в модуле «Кристалл». 23 февраля 1999 года на орбите вылупились первые птенцы, которые к вечеру вели себя очень активно. На следующий день на «Мире» уже была целая стая «пернатых космонавтов» – 37 птенцов, десять из которых начали готовить к приземлению в специальной камере возврата.



25 февраля в Главном зале ЦУПа собрались журналисты, чтобы пообщаться с экипажами 26-й и 27-й экспедиций на «Мир». Делясь впечатлениями от нахождения на станции, Иван Белла заметил, что условия для жизни отличные: «человек может выбрать себе место, где ему удобно, все системы жизнеобеспечения работают хорошо, никаких проблем здесь нет». На вопрос: не трудно ли ему выполнять такую насыщенную научную программу, пребывая на «Мире» всего шесть суток, в период острой адаптации организма к невесомости, Иван Белла честно ответил, что сначала было трудно. Как правило, до обеда он «чувствовал себя хорошо, но во второй половине дня период адаптации чуть-чуть проявлялся. Однако с каждым днём становилось всё лучше, и сегодня в три часа дня уже нормально себя чувствую, это значит, что период адаптации прошёл, и я могу полноценно работать».



Рано утром 28 февраля 1999 года Геннадий Падалка и Иван Белла вернулись на Землю. Увы, семь птенцов погибли при спуске от холода: температура в спускаемом аппарате была всего 10-11 °C, а камера возврата была не обогреваемой. Но три перепелёнка выжили. Сразу по возвращении был снят фильм об их поведении в условиях земной гравитации.

Указом президента России Бориса Ельцина Иван Белла был награждён российским Орденом Мужества за «мужество и самоотверженность, проявленные при осуществлении полёта на космическом транспортном корабле «Союз-ТМ» и орбитальном научно-исследовательском комплексе «Мир»».

А Виктор Афанасьев, Жан-Пьер Эньере и Сергей Авдеев остались «нести вахту» на орбитальной станции. Им необходимо было выполнить ещё много работы, в том числе по внекорабельной деятельности. В частности, В.М. Афанасьеву и С.В. Авдееву удалось установить и раскрыть в открытом космосе 6-метровую трансформируемую крупногабаритную антенну «Рефлектор», особенностью которой была повышенная жёсткость конструкции, необходимая для цифрового теле- и радиовещания, подвижной связи и навигации.

Экипаж 27-й экспедиции на «Мир» вернулся на Землю 28 августа 1999 года, причём Сергей Авдеев находился на станции с 13 августа 1998 года! Продолжительность полёта В.М. Афанасьева и Ж.-П. Эньере составила 188 суток 20 часов 16 минут, а С.В. Авдеева – 379 суток 14 часов 51 минуту. Общая продолжительность пребывания в космосе Сергея Васильевича составила 747 суток 14 часов 14 минут (за три полёта). До 2005 года это был мировой рекорд.




Стоит отметить, что с возвращением экипажа 27-й экспедиции на Землю была завершена десятилетняя беспрерывная эксплуатация станции «Мир» в пилотируемом режиме.

http://www.gctc.ru/main.php?id=4540

http://www.spacefacts.de/english/bio_inte.htm
http://www.spacefacts.de/english/bio_inte.htm

Wątek poświęcony słowackiemu kosmonaucie: http://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=3544.msg129129#msg129129
« Ostatnia zmiana: Marzec 01, 2019, 22:34 wysłana przez Orionid »

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9754
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Kalendarium historycznych wydarzeń
« Odpowiedź #311 dnia: Marzec 08, 2019, 21:14 »
40 lat temu miał miejsce rollout wahadłowca z Palmdale do  bazy Edwards w Kalifornii.

Mar. 8, 1979 - The unveiling/rollout and overland transport of Space Shuttle Columbia from Palmdale to Edwards AFB



Remembering The Space Shuttle Columbia
mww  February 19, 2018

Columbia (OV-102), the first of NASA’s orbiter fleet, was delivered to Kennedy Space Center in March 1979. (...)

Construction Milestones

July 26, 1972   Contract Award
March 25, 1975   Start long lead fabrication aft fuselage
November 17, 1975   Start long-lead fabrication of crew module
June 28, 1976   Start assembly of crew module
September 13, 1976   Start structural assembly of aft-fuselage
December 13, 1976   Start assembly upper forward fuselage
January 3, 1977   Start assembly vertical stabilizer
August 26, 1977   Wings arrive at Palmdale from Grumman
October 28, 1977   Lower forward fuselage on dock, Palmdale
November 7, 1977   Start of Final Assembly
February 24, 1978   Body flap on dock, Palmdale
April 28, 1978   Forward payload bay doors on dock, Palmdale
May 26,1978   Upper forward fuselage mate
July 7, 1978   Complete mate forward and aft payload bay doors
September 11, 1978   Complete forward RCS
February 3, 1979   Complete combined systems test, Palmdale
February 16, 1979   Airlock on dock, Palmdale
March 5, 1979   Complete postcheckout
March 8, 1979   Closeout inspection, Final Acceptance Palmdale
March 8, 1979   Rollout from Palmdale to Dryden (38 miles)
March 12, 1979   Overland transport from Palmdale to Edwards
March 20, 1979   SCA Ferry Flight from DFRF to Bigs AFB, Texas
March 22, 1979   SCA Ferry flight from Bigs AFB to Kelly AFB, Texas
March 24, 1979   SCA Ferry flight from Kelly AFB to Eglin AFB, Florida
March 24, 1979   SCA Ferry flight from Eglin, AFB to KSC
November 3, 1979   Auxiliary Power Unit hot fire tests, OPF KSC
December 16, 1979   Orbiter integrated test start, KSC
January 14, 1980   Orbiter integrated test complete, KSC
February 20, 1981   Flight Readiness Firing
April 12, 1981   First Flight (STS-1)
(...)
https://myworldweb.com/remembering-space-shuttle-columbia/

Space Shuttle Columbia: A New Beginning and Vision
written by Chris Gebhardt February 1, 2011



(...) These segments were successfully mated together by July 7, and by September 11 her forward RCS (Reaction Control System) pod was completed.

On February 3, 1979, technicians completed combined systems testing on Columbia and proceeded on to completion of airlock door installation by February 16 as well as vehicle post-checkout completion by March 5.

From there, crews conducted closeout inspection and procedures for final acceptance at Palmdale by March 8.

On this same day, Columbia rolled out of her Palmdale construction facility and was transported overland to Dryden for her official unveiling ceremony and mating to the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) for the start of the ferry flight to Kennedy on March 9.


Final assembly of Columbia began on November 7, 1977. Her Body Flap arrived at Palmdale three months later on February 24, 1978, as did her Payload Bay door segments on April 28. (...)
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2011/02/space-shuttle-columbia-a-new-beginning-and-vision/
http://www.collectspace.com/ubb/Forum30/HTML/000734.html

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9754
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Kalendarium historycznych wydarzeń
« Odpowiedź #312 dnia: Marzec 18, 2019, 23:55 »
54 lata temu 18 marca 1965 Aleksiej Leonow odbył pierwszy w historii spacer kosmiczny.

Первый выход человека в открытое космическое пространство
18 марта 2019



(...) 18 марта 1965 года в 10 часов по московскому времени с космодрома Байконур стартовал космический корабль «Восход-2» с экипажем в составе Павла Ивановича Беляева и Алексея Архиповича Леонова. В 11 часов 35 минут А.А. Леонов первым в мире покинул шлюзовую камеру корабля и сделал шаг навстречу космосу. В открытом космическом пространстве он провёл 12 минут 9 секунд. Первый выход в открытый космос был не только важным научно-техническим достижением своего времени, но и событием, которое открыло новый этап в освоении космоса человеком – именно с шага А.А. Леонова за пределы «Восхода-2» началась история внекорабельной деятельности, которая является важной составляющей работы  космонавтов и астронавтов. (...)
http://www.gctc.ru/main.php?id=2964

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSYWa234l1I" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSYWa234l1I</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSYWa234l1I

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6EQwsYUMcQ4" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6EQwsYUMcQ4</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6EQwsYUMcQ4
« Ostatnia zmiana: Marzec 19, 2019, 00:00 wysłana przez Orionid »

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9754
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Kalendarium historycznych wydarzeń
« Odpowiedź #313 dnia: Marzec 26, 2019, 09:41 »
W tym miesiącu mija 25 rocznica lotu STS-62 Columbia.
W czasie misji prowadzono wtedy najbardziej zaawansowane badania w warunkach mikrograwitacji. Podstawowym zadaniem załogi było testowanie rozwiązań inzynieryjnych związanych z budową przyszłej stacji kosmicznej.

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/archives/sts-62.html
http://www.spacefacts.de/mission/english/sts-62.htm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-62

'Cutting Edge': Remembering STS-62, 25 Years On
By Ben Evans, on March 10th, 2019


Tropical Storm Owen vividly backdrops Columbia’s silhouetted payload bay, aft bulkhead and vertical stabilizer during STS-62. Photo Credit: NASA, via Joachim Becker/SpaceFacts.de

A quarter-century ago, this week, five astronauts aboard shuttle Columbia sailed through a mission which their launch announcer had earlier described as “the cutting edge of microgravity research”. STS-62 Commander John Casper, Pilot Andy Allen and Mission Specialists Pierre Thuot, Sam Gemar and Marsha Ivins spent 14 days in March 1994 overseeing a virtual miniature space station—with materials and space technology research, medical and biological experiments, solar physics instrumentation and robotics—in the shuttle’s cavernous payload bay and middeck. And for Ivins in particular, it would offer an early glimpse of the technology that she would one day use to install the U.S. Destiny lab onto the International Space Station (ISS).


The STS-62 crew departs the Operations & Checkout (O&C) Building on the morning of 4 March 1994. From left are Marsha Ivins, Andy Allen, Sam Gemar, John Casper and Pierre Thuot. Photo Credit: NASA, via Joachim Becker/SpaceFacts.de

“Flawless, all the way up,” was Allen’s description of the climb to orbit by NASA’s oldest shuttle, which rocketed away from Pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida at 8:53 a.m. EST on 4 March 1994. That flawless nature was undoubtedly aided by the fact that he and Casper wore new water-cooled undergarments under their pressure suits, which Casper later said made them feel “as cool as a chilled martini at sunset”.

But the weeks preceding STS-62 had been equally smooth, with a launch scrub on 3 March caused only by an overly cautious reaction to a potentially poor weather forecast.


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MP6LynoxpXo" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MP6LynoxpXo</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MP6LynoxpXo

Video Credit: National Space Society

Yet for Allen, as he later recalled in a Smithsonian interview, the worst thing about launching for space was saying goodbye to his children. “My process in the quarantine period before launch was to get my will all squared away and write notes and letters to my kids,” he said. During the suiting-up process in the Operations & Checkout (O&C) Building, Allen was captured by NASA TV cameras writing a message to his daughters, Jessica and Meredith.

“Having been in the Marine Corps, and been on aircraft carriers and had gazillions of close calls as a fighter pilot, nothing is as stretched-out as getting ready for a spaceflight,” he recalled to the Smithsonian interviewer. “Partly, it was because my kids…were at an age where they understood what was going on. Daddy might blow up and he might not come back.”



Columbia roars into orbit on 4 March 1994. Photo Credit: NASA, via Joachim Becker/SpaceFacts.de

When Columbia was safely established in orbit, with an inclination of 39 degrees—affording the crew a spectacular perspective on most of the inhabited Earth—the payload bay doors were opened to reveal the second U.S. Microgravity Payload, laden with materials solidification processing furnaces, an accelerometer, an experiment to grow ultra-pure dendrites and an investigation into the behavior of xenon as it neared its “critical point”, where its physical characteristics hovered between liquid and gas.

Many of the payloads had flown before and, significantly, were utilizing “telescience”, with remote commanding from ground-based operators, as was expected to be possible during future space station operations. Throughout STS-62’s two weeks aloft, hundreds of commands were transmitted from the ground to the shuttle, adjusting experiment settings and tweaking various parameters to make changes as new and unexpected data emerged.



The USMP-2 payload is lowered into Columbia’s payload bay ahead of STS-62, with OAST-2 already in place. Photo Credit: NASA, via Joachim Becker/SpaceFacts.de

Alongside the microgravity research, another package of experiments provided by NASA’s Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology focused on evaluations of new solar cells and energy-storage hardware, as well as investigating the influence of atomic oxygen and plasma upon the shuttle surfaces. The experiments required Casper and Allen to lower Columbia’s altitude to enhance their data-collecting capabilities.

If preparing for the space station was a major goal for STS-62, then the work continued inside the shuttle’s cabin. Squirreled away in the middeck was a set of miniaturized station modules and girder-like trusses—the Middeck 0-Gravity Dynamics Experiment, tended by Gemar—which sought to understand the dynamics of large deployable structures. All told, more than nine gigabits of data were gathered from this experiment alone and, by the end of STS-62, more than 10,000 images had been acquired by a battery of cameras.



Marsha Ivins at work during STS-62. Photo Credit: NASA, via Joachim Becker/SpaceFacts.de

Outside the shuttle, a nifty extension to the 50-foot-long (15-meter) Remote Manipulator System (RMS), known as the Dexterous End Effector (DEE), demonstrated a set of powerful, U-shaped electromagnets to generate an attraction force of 3,200 pounds (1,450 kg). This was an alternative to the traditional RMS method of grappling its payloads by means of a wire “snare”, which closed around a capture pin on its target. From the astronauts’ perspective, DEE afforded them a sense of “touch” with the arm and yielded vital benefits when working on the development of smaller, more compact grapple fixtures for new spacecraft. Ivins considered it a useful analog for space station construction and, a few years hence, she would utilize the RMS to install the U.S. Destiny lab onto the nascent ISS.

Living and working in a volume the size of a smaller camper van for two weeks was surprisingly comfortable, with Allen anchoring his sleeping bag on the flight deck, Casper and Gemar securing theirs against the starboard wall of the middeck, Thuot tying himself to the middeck ceiling and Ivins jamming herself into the airlock to rest. The only obstacle, the male members of the crew later recalled, was remembering to get out of Ivins’ way whenever she was cleaning her flowing hair…



Columbia’s payloads in action during STS-62. Photo Credit: NASA, via Joachim Becker/SpaceFacts.de

Early on 18 March, as planned, Columbia returned smoothly to Earth, touching down on the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the Cape, an hour shy of the duration record set a few months earlier by the astronauts of STS-58. “It would have been nice to get the record,” Casper admitted later, but acquiesced that “I think we did a lot of good things”. Touching down on the Runway 33 “end” of the SLF, the crew waited until shortly before derotating the nose at 175 knots before Allen punched out the drag chute.

However, in an ominous harbinger of the future, a “debris liberation” was noted when four fragments fell from the shuttle’s underside as her landing gear deployed. No evidence was found of superheated plasma having entered Columbia’s wheel-well and the thermal protection system performed as advertised, but nine years later—during the presidential inquiry into the STS-107 tragedy—Adm. Harold Gehman’s investigative board would focus closely on the closing minutes of STS-62. So serious was the incident that NASA engineers spent two days scouring Runway 33 for additional debris and, certainly, it offered a worrying reminder that even in its halcyon days, the shuttle was never a truly safe machine.


https://www.americaspace.com/2019/03/10/cutting-edge-remembering-sts-62-25-years-on/
« Ostatnia zmiana: Marzec 26, 2019, 18:37 wysłana przez Orionid »

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9754
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Kalendarium historycznych wydarzeń
« Odpowiedź #314 dnia: Marzec 26, 2019, 09:42 »
W tym miesiącu minęło 30 lat od wyprawy STS-29 Discovery.
Głównym zadaniem  misji było umieszczenie na orbicie  satelity  TDRS-D (Tracking and Data Relay Satellite) , który po uruchomieniu został przemianowany na  TDRS-4.

http://www.spacefacts.de/english/bio_ast.htm
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/archives/sts-29.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-29

[AmericaSpace] Remembering Shuttle Discovery's STS-29 Mission, 30 Years On

Remembering Shuttle Discovery's STS-29 Mission, 30 Years On
By Ben Evans, on March 17th, 2019


Discovery rockets into orbit on STS-29 in March 1989, three decades ago, this month. Photo Credit: NASA

Flying in space, remembered astronaut John Blaha—who made the first of his five missions, 30 years ago, this month—vanished in the flicker of an eye. On 13 March 1989, Blaha and his four crewmates launched aboard shuttle Discovery on the relatively “vanilla” STS-29 flight to deliver a major NASA communications satellite into space. Seated in the pilot’s seat, alongside future Johnson Space Center (JSC) Director Mike Coats, Blaha was joined by Mission Specialists Bob Springer, Jim Buchli and Jim Bagian. Most of the crew had been recycled from a pre-Challenger assignment to a flight which might have seen the first citizens of Indonesia and the UK to travel into space.


The “core” NASA crew of the former Mission 61H, pictured during one of their post-Challenger extended simulations. From left to right are Mike Coats, John Blaha, Anna Fisher, Bob Springer and (standing) Jim Buchli. Photo Credit: NASA/Joachim Becker/SpaceFacts.de

Coats, Blaha and Springer had been together as a crew since January 1985, when they were assigned—alongside fellow astronauts Anna Fisher and Norm Thagard—to Mission 61C, then planned for launch the following December. However, during the course of the year, the shuttle manifest shifted and contorted and by September 1985 the flight had been redesigned “Mission 61H”, rescheduled for June 1986, and Thagard’s place had been taken by veteran astronaut Jim Buchli.

In the final months before the January 1986 loss of Challenger, the crew was joined by Nigel Wood and Pratiwi Sudarmono, who were primed to become the first British and Indonesian spacefarers. Primary payloads aboard 61H included the Palapa-B3 and Skynet-4A communications satellites for Indonesia and the UK, together with Westar-6S for Western Union.


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_d3leHW57I" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_d3leHW57I</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_d3leHW57I

Following Challenger’s destruction, Wood and Sudarmono were stood down from training and all shuttle crews were suspended, pending the findings of the presidential Rogers Commission into the tragedy. However, Coats’ core crew remained together for a 32-hour shuttle flight simulation at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas, in October 1986. Known as “STS-61M-T”, the simulation afforded astronauts, instructors and flight controllers an opportunity to keep their skills sharp. “The idea was to keep the whole training system running,” Blaha remembered in his NASA oral history. “We had a two-day simulation mission, then we actually went back into training again.”

In March 1988, Coats, Blaha, Springer and Buchli were assigned to STS-29, then targeted for launch in January 1989 to deploy the fourth Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-D). Fisher’s place on the original crew was taken by Jim Bagian. Her removal from the mission came as a bitter pill to swallow, with Blaha paying tribute to her knowledge and skills—“ten or 20 IQ points above the other three of us”—which allowed her, as flight engineer, to spot brewing malfunctions with split-second timing. Oftentimes Fisher caught problems even more quickly than Blaha himself, calling to him in the simulator to throw a certain switch at a certain time.



Seated on the flight deck of the shuttle simulator, the STS-29 crew consisted of (from left) John Blaha, Jim Bagian, Jim Buchli, Bob Springer and Mike Coats. Photo Credit: NASA, via Joachim Becker/SpaceFacts.de

When the shuttle program returned to flight for the first time since Challenger in September 1988, STS-29 found itself in third place and was eventually rescheduled to launch no sooner than 18 February 1989. This date proved untenable, when engineers were required to replace faulty liquid oxygen turbopumps on Discovery’s three main engines, and a revised date of 11 March was set. This, too, came to nothing, when a failed master events controller required replacement and testing. With Discovery herself also slated to fly a classified Department of Defense mission—STS-33—in August 1989, Coats’ crew was made aware of the possibility that their flight might be shortened from five to four days, in order to get the shuttle back on the ground for a tight processing turnaround. Privately, Blaha wondered if a single day would really make a difference. As circumstances transpired, it didn’t: STS-29 flew five days and STS-33 wound up getting delayed until the end of 1989.

At length, in the small hours of 13 March 1989—30 years ago, this past week—Coats managed to persuade Jim Bagian to don a coat and tie and all five men sat down to breakfast in crew quarters at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). After putting on their bulky partial-pressure suits and taking the Astrovan out to Pad 39B, they were strapped into their seats aboard Discovery…and waited.

And waited some more.



Attached to its Boeing-built Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) booster, the TDRS-D satellite departs Discovery’s payload bay on the afternoon of 13 March 1989. Photo Credit: NASA, via Joachim Becker/SpaceFacts.de

Ground fog and high upper-level winds delayed the liftoff by almost two hours, which proved particularly uncomfortable, as the astronauts were all lying on their backs, with their legs elevated. “Mike Coats had a very bad backache,” Blaha recalled later, “so he finally decided he had to unstrap, because we were being delayed for such a long time. We ended up laying on our backs…very close to the five-hour limit, before we launched.” At one point in the countdown, Coats’ discomfort was so intense that he found himself lying on his left side, and then his right side, in the commander’s seat. At long last, Discovery thundered into space at 9:57 a.m. EST.

With Coats and Buchli both having flown before, STS-29 was the first space mission for Blaha, Springer and Bagian, all three of whom adapted well to the microgravity environment. “From that first millisecond that we were in zero-G,” Blaha reflected later, “I never felt bad.” Only hours into the flight, at 4:10 p.m. EST, the gigantic TDRS-D satellite—mounted atop a solid-fueled Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) booster—was successfully deployed on the first leg of its journey to geostationary altitude. Although the deployment went well, hearts sprang momentarily into throats when a data dropout between the shuttle and the IUS popped up a couple of minutes before TDRS-D was released.



Beautiful view of the Home Planet, as seen by the STS-29 astronauts. Photo Credit: NASA/Joachim Becker/SpaceFacts.de

Five “feeling-good” astronauts and a successful completion of their primary mission objective could produce only one appropriate piece of wake-up music on the morning of 14 March, their first full day in space. The strains of James Brown’s I Feel Good echoed from Mission Control and into Discovery’s crew cabin. After conveying his thanks to Capcom David Low, Coats queried how they had managed to get Brown—who was then serving time in prison for assault, drugs and speeding offences—into Mission Control. He asked Low if Brown had gotten parole to sing to them, and was assured that it was “a special performance”.

Over the remainder of their time in orbit, the astronauts tended to student experiments focused on chicken eggs and rats, a demonstration of a Space Station Freedom “heat-pipe” concept and protein crystal growth and plant growth investigations. Exercise was of paramount importance, although on one occasion Blaha was bemused to witness Springer and Bagian doing pull-ups on the middeck ceiling. Seeing “the Marine” (Springer) and “the doctor” Bagian thus competing, Blaha grabbed a camera and started filming. “Couldn’t resist the picture,” he told the STS-29 post-flight press conference, with Springer helpfully declaring that, naturally, “the Marine won!”



The STS-29 official crew patch, designed by the five astronauts. Image Credit: NASA, via Joachim Becker/SpaceFacts.de

In spite of worries that their mission might be shortened, STS-29 ran to its full length of five days and Coats and Blaha began the deorbit “burn” to bring Discovery home in the early hours of 18 March. Touching down on concrete Runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., at 6:35 a.m. PST, the mission had been a spectacular success, but had one more surprise in store for the crew. Below an altitude of 15,000 feet (5,000 meters), Coats felt that the vehicle handled very much like the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) than he and Blaha had flown so many times over the years.

However, there was a fundamental difference when flying the shuttle for real. Even with its engines in reverse, the STA—a modified Gulfstream business jet—had made a racket, whereas the unpowered shuttle was the exact opposite. And that produced an unanticipated surprise: the sound of the wind, roaring outside, almost invitingly, as they descended back home to Earth.


https://www.americaspace.com/2019/03/17/remembering-shuttle-discoverys-sts-29-mission-30-years-on/