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Offline kanarkusmaximus

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Odp: STS-107
« Odpowiedź #60 dnia: Luty 06, 2013, 00:14 »
Moim zdaniem naprawdę trudno streścić w jednym tekście całość wydarzeń przy STS-107 oraz późniejszych zmian, jakie sie dokonały w sektorze kosmicznym. Z pewnością do historii o STS-107 można wpleść prace przed misją STS-114 i STS-121 (które wielu z nas komentowało "na żywo", od startu aż do lądowania) czy "nieszczęsnej" Vision of Space Exploration...

Offline Sokole Oko

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Odp: STS-107
« Odpowiedź #61 dnia: Luty 01, 2014, 12:50 »
I mamy 11. rocznicę tego smutnego wydarzenia. Dzisiaj podobnie jak 11 lat temu, również mamy sobotę. Pamiętam jak śledziłem wtedy transmisję na żywo... :(

Offline kanarkusmaximus

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Odp: STS-107
« Odpowiedź #62 dnia: Luty 01, 2014, 19:27 »
Warto przeczytać krótki wpis Wayne Hale na jego blogu związany z STS-107:
http://waynehale.wordpress.com/2014/02/01/finding-columbia/

Offline kanarkusmaximus

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Odp: STS-107
« Odpowiedź #63 dnia: Czerwiec 19, 2014, 13:41 »
Nowa publikacja: aeromedyczna nauka z STS-107:
http://spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=45821

Sądzę, że kilka osób z tego forum może się bardzo zainteresować tą publikacją!

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Odp: STS-107
« Odpowiedź #64 dnia: Luty 01, 2017, 23:59 »

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Odp: STS-107
« Odpowiedź #65 dnia: Luty 11, 2017, 19:56 »
Misja STS-107 była jedną z nielicznych w tamtych czasach, która nie miala dokować do ISS. Na orbicie zostało  przeprowadzonych ponad 80 eksperymentów z zakresu nauk biologicznych i fizycznych. Załoga pracowała w systemie dwuzmianowym, który pozwalał na pracę przez 24 godziny na dobę. Zebrane dane okazały sie dużym sukcesem, jednak najwięcej wyników miało być dostępnych po lądowaniu promu na Ziemi.
W okresie 5 lat była to czwarta misja Columbii. Lot zakończył sie katastrofą, która miała wpływ na wcześniejsze zakończenie programu lotów wahadłowców.

'So Thin and Fragile': Remembering Columbia's Final Mission
By Ben Evans February 4th, 2017

When Columbia’s payload bay doors opened at around midday EST on 16 January 2003—a few hours after NASA’s oldest Space Shuttle had reached orbit for the 28th time—they exposed a cargo unlike anything which had flown into space for almost five years. Most shuttle missions in the interim had been exclusively dedicated to the construction of the International Space Station (ISS) and only four—a radar-mapping flight, two Hubble Space Telescope servicing calls and the deployment of the Chandra X-ray Observatory—had been dedicated to non-station activities.

This caused concern to both the scientific community and Congress, who feared that such paucity of “science” missions threatened to harm the United States’ lead in the microgravity research arena. “We can’t expect the scientific community to remain engaged,” Congressman Dana Rohrabacher told a March 2000 hearing, “if researchers do not see hope that there will be research flight opportunities on a regular basis.” Columbia’s 16-day mission, STS-107, was set to address that issue.(...)


A week and a half after launch, on 27 January, the crew had the chance to speak to the three-man Expedition Six team aboard the ISS. Commander Ken Bowersox and Flight Engineers Nikolai Budarin and Don Pettit had been in orbit since November 2002 and their communications session with Columbia occurred as the station—callsign “Alpha”—passed over eastern Ukraine and as the shuttle was over northern Brazil.

“Hey, Alpha, this is Columbia,” called Rick Husband. “How you doing over there?”

“We’re doing great. We’re so glad to see you guys made it into orbit,” replied Bowersox.

“We’re glad to be here, too,” said Husband. “We’re really excited to be able to talk to you guys, one space lab to another big old space lab on that beautiful station of yours.”

The conversation lasted just a handful of minutes, before the two crews bade each other farewell and drifted out of radio range. Next day, the 28th, they both joined with people on Earth in reflecting upon the loss of the Challenger Seven in 1986. As Rick Husband spoke of his profound sadness at the loss of those seven brave lives, he could hardly have imagined that his own crew would follow them in barely four days’ time.


część 1 artykułu: http://www.americaspace.com/?p=97637

(...) Suddenly, at 8:58 a.m. EST, Commander Husband made his first radio communication since entry interface a quarter of an hour earlier. He started to call Houston, but his words were abruptly cut off. A few seconds later came a loss of temperature and pressure data from both the inboard and outboard tires of Columbia’s landing gear in the left well. If the tires were holed or losing pressure, it was very bad news, for STS-107 was a “heavyweight” mission with the fully-loaded Spacehab module and experiment pallet. A “wheels-up” belly landing was not expected to be survivable. The astronauts would need to perform a never-before-tried bailout, utilizing an escape pole system implemented after Challenger, but this could not be attempted until Columbia was at much lower altitude and at much lower relative airspeed.

Data loss would include that for tire pressures and temperatures, brake pressures and temperatures,” concluded McCluney.

After hearing Jeff Kling’s report, astronaut Charlie Hobaugh—the lead Capcom on duty that morning and the man responsible for talking directly to the STS-107 crew—called Husband to inform him of the anomalous tire pressure messages. Hobaugh also asked Husband to repeat his last comment. There was no reply from the rapidly-descending Columbia. By now, LeRoy Cain was pressing Kling for answers on whether the messages were due to faulty instrumentation, but was advised that all associated sensors were reading “off-scale-low”—they had simply stopped working.

Seconds later, at 8:59:32 a.m., Husband tried again to contact Mission Control. These were to be the last words ever received from Space Shuttle Columbia.

“Roger,” he said, presumably acknowledging Hobaugh’s earlier pressure call, “uh, buh…” At that point, abruptly, his words were cut off in mid-sentence, together with the flow of data from the orbiter. Communications were never restored. Thirty-two seconds after Husband’s partial transmission, a ground-based observer with a camcorder shot video footage of multiple debris contrails streaking like tears across the Texas sky. (...)


Część 2: http://www.americaspace.com/?p=97632
Szczegółowy przebieg katastrofy
http://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=800.msg101481#msg101481

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Odp: STS-107
« Odpowiedź #66 dnia: Luty 11, 2017, 19:56 »

(01/16/2003) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The STS-107 crew, waving to onlookers, exits the Operations and Checkout Building on their way to Launch Pad 39A for liftoff. Leading the way are Pilot William "Willie" McCool (left) and Commander Rick Husband (right). Following in the second row are Mission Specialists Kalpana Chawla (left) and Laurel Clark; in the rear are Payload Specialist Ilan Ramon, Payload Commander Michael Anderson and Mission Specialist David Brown. Ramon is the first astronaut from Israel to fly on a Shuttle. The 16-day mission is devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. The payload on Space Shuttle Columbia includes FREESTAR (Fast Reaction Experiments Enabling Science, Technology, Applications and Research) and the SHI Research Double Module (SHI/RDM), known as SPACEHAB. Experiments on the module range from material sciences to life sciences. Liftoff is scheduled for 10:39 a.m. EST.


KSC-03PD-0113 (01/16/2003) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Through a cloud-washed blue sky above Launch Pad 39A, Space Shuttle Columbia hurtles toward space on mission STS-107. Following a flawless and uneventful countdown, liftoff occurred on-time at 10:39 a.m. EST. The 16-day research mission will include FREESTAR (Fast Reaction Experiments Enabling Science, Technology, Applications and Research) and the SHI Research Double Module (SHI/RDM), known as SPACEHAB. Experiments on the module range from material sciences to life sciences. Landing is scheduled at about 8:53 a.m. EST on Saturday, Feb. 1. This mission is the first Shuttle mission of 2003. Mission STS-107 is the 28th flight of the orbiter Columbia and the 113th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program.


(01/16/2003) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Seconds after launch, Space Shuttle Columbia appears as a flaming tip of the smoke column it trails.


JSC2003-E-06822 (16 January 2003) -- These are two composite images of Columbia during ascent on STS-107. The images are both derived from an average of 17 video fields totalling about one-quarter of a second of video. The left image is taken from video before a debris strike recorded by other cameras. The one on the right is taken from video after a debris strike recorded by other cameras. The imagery from video was of too low resolution, however, to be significant for use in an engineering analysis that was performed during Columbia's flight regarding the debris strike.


JSC2003-E-02609 (16 January 2003) --- An overall view of the shuttle flight control room (WFCR) in Houston’s Mission Control Center (MCC). At the time this photo was taken the Space Shuttle Columbia was about to launch at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Columbia launched at 9:39 a.m. (CST) on January 16, 2003. Once the vehicle cleared the tower in Florida, the Houston-based team of flight controllers took over the ground control of the STS-107 flight.


JSC2001-02464 (18 September 2001) --- The seven STS-107 crew members wait for a training and photo session to begin in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). From the left are Ilan Ramon, payload specialist; William C. McCool, pilot; along with David M. Brown and Kalpana Chawla, both mission specialists; Michael P. Anderson, payload commander; Laurel B. Clark, mission specialist; and Rick D. Husband, mission commander. Ramon represents the Israeli Space Agency.


JSC2002-02091 (13 November 2002) --- Astronaut Kalpana Chawla, STS-107 mission specialist, assisted by a diver, floats in a small life raft during an emergency egress training session in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) near the Johnson Space Center (JSC). Chawla is wearing a training version of the shuttle launch and entry suit.


JSC2002-E-25927 (17 June 2002) --- Astronaut Kalpana Chawla, STS-107 mission specialist, participates in a camera equipment training session at Johnson Space Center (JSC).


JSC2002-E-25928 (10 June 2002) --- The STS-107 crewmembers, along with Stephanie Turner (center) of the United Space Alliance (USA), pause from their mission training for a cake cutting ceremony in the Jake Garn Simulation and Training Facility at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). From left are astronauts Laurel B. Clark, Kalpana Chawla, both mission specialists; William C. McCool, pilot; Rick D. Husband, mission commander; David M. Brown, Michael P. Anderson, both mission specialists; and Ilan Ramon, payload specialist representing the Israeli Space Agency.




JSC2002-E-30459 (25 July 2002) --- The STS-107 crewmembers pose for an informal crew portrait near a T-38 trainer jet at Ellington Field near Johnson Space Center (JSC). From the left are astronauts Rick D. Husband, mission commander; William C. McCool, pilot; David M. Brown, Laurel B. Clark, both mission specialists; payload specialist Ilan Ramon; astronauts Michael P. Anderson and Kalpana Chawla, both mission specialists. Ramon represents the Israeli Space Agency.


STS107-301-028 (16 January – 1 February 2003) --- Astronaut Michael P. Anderson, STS-107 payload commander, speaks into a portable microphone while working at the Combustion Module (CM-2) in the SPACEHAB Research Double Module (RDM) aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. Visible behind him is the Thermoelectric Holding Module (TEHM) and Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) facilities.  This picture was on a roll of unprocessed film later recovered by searchers from the debris.


STS107-E-05020 (17 January 2003) --- Astronauts Laurel B. Clark and Rick D. Husband, STS-107 mission specialist and mission commander, respectively, are pictured near supportive equipment for experiments on the SPACEHAB Research Double Module aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia.


STS107-E-05029A (18 January 2003) --- Ilan Ramon, STS-107 payload specialist representing the Israel Space Agency, joined his six crewmates in getting the Space Shuttle Columbia and its SPACEHAB Research Double Module ready for 16 days of scientific research.


STS107-E-05026 (18 January 2003) --- Astronaut William C. McCool, STS-107 pilot, is pictured on the aft flight deck of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia.


STS107-E-05054 (18 January 2003) --- Astronaut David M. Brown, STS-107 mission specialist, participates in an experiment requiring the use of the bicycle ergometer in the SPACEHAB Research Double Module onboard the Space Shuttle Columbia.


STS107-E-05001 (17 January 2003) --- Astronaut Kalpana Chawla, STS-107 mission specialist, is pictured on the flight deck of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia.

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Odp: STS-107
« Odpowiedź #67 dnia: Luty 11, 2017, 19:56 »

STS107-E-05290 (21 January 2003) --- Using a 400mm lens on a digital still camera, one of the STS-107 crewmembers aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia captured this winter image of Mashhad, Iran. With a population of just over two million, Mashhad is Iran’s second-largest city. It is located in the Kashaf River valley near the northeast corner of the country, not far away from the borders of Turkmenistan and Afghanistan. Besides being the capital and center of commerce for Khorasan province, Mashhad is a tourist center as well as a site of pilgrimage for millions to the shrine of martyred Shi’ate Imam Reza. The crew of STS-107 acquired this snow-enhanced image just after noon (local time) on January 21, 2003. The long runways of the international airport, on the southeastern edge of the city, run parallel to the prevailing valley winds. Note how little snow is visible in the urbanized areas and the discoloration of snow in the surrounding area, probably due to wind-borne smoke generated by fuel burning in the city. The image was provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center.


STS107-393-014 (16 January – 1 February 2003) --- This view featuring the southeastern Mediterranean and Egyptian/Sinai Peninsula/Israel border was photographed by an STS-107 crewmember onboard the Space Shuttle Columbia.  This picture was on a roll of unprocessed film later recovered by searchers from the debris.


S107-E-05059 (18 January 2003) --- Nadir view over the von Karman Vortices off the Atlantic coast of Africa, photographed from an altitude of 146 nautical miles or 270 kilometers on January 18, 2003 during the 29th orbit of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The precise nadir point is located at 12.7 degrees north latitude and 27.8 degrees west longitude.


STS107-E-05405 (21 January 2003) --- One of the astronauts onboard the Space Shuttle Columbia used a digital still camera to capture this photograph of Mono Lake in California. Mono Lake lies east of Yosemite National Park.


STS107-E-05410 (23 January 2003) --- (Editor's Note: For orientation purposes, view should be rotated 90 degrees to left) One of the astronauts aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia used a digital still camera to capture this image of Cataract Canyon (foreground) cutting across the Colorado Plateau to join the Grand Canyon. It runs toward the northwest to become Havasu Canyon and then join the Grand Canyon on the south near Supai. The Grand Canyon itself is under cloud, along the top, and bends around to continue along the left as well.


STS107-E-05697 (26 January 2003) --- A quarter moon is visible in this oblique view of Earth's horizon and airglow, recorded with a digital still camera aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia.


JSC2003-E-13226 (28 January 2003) --- This image of the Space Shuttle Columbia in orbit during mission STS-107 was taken by the U.S. Air Force Maui Optical and Supercomputing Site (AMOS) on Jan. 28, four days before Columbia's reentry, as the spacecraft flew above the island of Maui in the Hawaiian Islands.


JSC2003-E-08089 (1 February 2003) --- This image is a view of the underside of Columbia during its entry from mission STS-107 on Feb. 1, 2003, as it passed by the Starfire Optical Range, Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico. The image was taken at approximately 7:57 a.m. CST. This image was received by NASA as part of the Columbia accident investigation and is being analyzed.


JSC2003-E-03368 (1 February 2003) --- An overall view of the shuttle flight control room (WFCR) in Houston’s Mission Control Center (MCC) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). At the time this photo was taken, flight controllers had just lost contact with the Space Shuttle Columbia.




JSC2003-E-14342 (Released on 25 Feb. 2003) --- A view of a single thermal protection system tile from the Space Shuttle Columbia that was recently recovered near Powell, Texas, as part of the ongoing debris recovery effort.


JSC2003-E-04031 (1 February 2003) --- In memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia crewmembers who lost their lives on February 1, 2003, a number of signs, U.S. flags, and flowers were placed on the fences near the main entrance at the Johnson Space Center (JSC).


JSC2003-E-05893 (4 February 2003) --- President George W. Bush addresses the crowd on the mall of the Johnson Space Center during the memorial for the Columbia astronauts.


STS107-735-032 (16 January – 1 February 2003) --- The STS-107 crewmembers strike a ‘flying’ pose for their traditional in-flight crew portrait in the SPACEHAB Research Double Module (RDM) aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. From the left (bottom row), wearing red shirts to signify their shift’s color, are astronauts Kalpana Chawla, mission specialist; Rick D. Husband, mission commander; Laurel B. Clark, mission specialist; and Ilan Ramon, payload specialist. From the left (top row), wearing blue shirts, are astronauts David M. Brown, mission specialist; William C. McCool, pilot; and Michael P. Anderson, payload commander. Ramon represents the Israeli Space Agency. This picture was on a roll of unprocessed film later recovered by searchers from the debris.

https://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-107/ndxpage14.html

Offline Air Q

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Odp: STS-107
« Odpowiedź #68 dnia: Luty 12, 2017, 01:20 »
Dokument o Ilanie Ramonie:
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=riHkc94Bouo" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=riHkc94Bouo</a>
"One could write a history of science in reverse by assembling the solemn pronouncements of highest authority about what could not be done and could never happen."
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity
Sprawdź SOL: http://www.greuti.ch/oppy/html/filenames_ltst.htm

Online Orionid

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Odp: STS-107
« Odpowiedź #69 dnia: Luty 01, 2018, 01:12 »
O pierwszym izraelskim astronaucie:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=494BcHxcJNE" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=494BcHxcJNE</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=494BcHxcJNE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JsyVquNbNY" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JsyVquNbNY</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JsyVquNbNY

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKDPY8R5a6I" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKDPY8R5a6I</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKDPY8R5a6I

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Odp: STS-107
« Odpowiedź #70 dnia: Luty 01, 2018, 01:33 »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7mEwf3vG8cc" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7mEwf3vG8cc</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7mEwf3vG8cc

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pT7GeqPF9O0" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pT7GeqPF9O0</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pT7GeqPF9O0
« Ostatnia zmiana: Luty 01, 2018, 02:25 wysłana przez Orionid »

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Odp: STS-107
« Odpowiedź #71 dnia: Luty 01, 2018, 02:25 »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sG2Utw7i14U" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sG2Utw7i14U</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sG2Utw7i14U

Offline kanarkusmaximus

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Odp: STS-107
« Odpowiedź #72 dnia: Luty 01, 2018, 10:15 »
No i mamy właśnie 15 lat od katastrofy promu Columbia.

Tu jest ciekawy materiał łączący NASA TV i CNN z 1 lutego 2003:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6OTlK8LVu8
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6OTlK8LVu8" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6OTlK8LVu8</a>

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Odp: STS-107
« Odpowiedź #73 dnia: Luty 02, 2018, 23:07 »
15 lat od katastrofy promu Columbia
BY KRZYSZTOF KANAWKA ON 1 LUTEGO 2018


Załoga misji STS-107 / Credits - NASA

(...) O godzinie 14:59 i 37 sekund (CET) dowódca misji STS-107 odpowiedział: „Roger, bo…”.

Komunikat został przerwany w połowie słowa. Jak się później okazało, był to ostatni odebrany sygnał z promu Columbia, choć kontrola lotu jeszcze o tym nie wiedziała. W tym samym czasie prom doświadczał już coraz większej fragmentacji i w ciągu kilku kolejnych minut został całkowicie zniszczony. Zginęła cała załoga, dla której nie było najmniejszej szansy ratunku. (...)

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uY1KPHzoYw0" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uY1KPHzoYw0</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uY1KPHzoYw0

Zsynchronizowany zapis ostatnich chwil promu Columbia / Credits – Chris Valentine

(...)
http://kosmonauta.net/2018/02/15-lat-od-katastrofy-promu-columbia/#prettyPhoto

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Odp: STS-107
« Odpowiedź #74 dnia: Marzec 18, 2018, 08:05 »
Zbiorowe dzieło poświęcone pamięci załogi utraconej Columbii trafiło do VAB (Vehicle Assembly Building)

Memorial Quilt Turned Over to Columbia Preservation Room
Author Linda Herridge , Posted on March 9, 2018


A giant hand-made quilt in honor of space shuttle Columbia and the seven crew members of STS-107 was turned over to the Columbia Preservation Room inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. From left, behind the quilt, are Janet Phillips, property custodian in Kennedy’s Office of Procurement; Mike Ciannilli, Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program manager; and Kevin Panik, customer advocate in Spaceport Integration. Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson

The 10-by16-foot quilt was designed by Katherine Walsh, originally from Kentucky, now residing in Dover, New Jersey. Walsh is a lifelong fan of NASA and the space program. After space shuttle Columbia and the crew were lost, she had an idea to create the quilt. Beginning in early February 2003, she sent out requests to the quilting community to create and send her quilt squares. By May, she had received fabric donations from adults and children in 13 states.
https://blogs.nasa.gov/kennedy/2018/03/09/memorial-quilt-turned-over-to-columbia-preservation-room/