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« Odpowiedź #210 dnia: Kwiecień 20, 2021, 02:37 »
Higher burning: The Air Launched Sortie Vehicle of the 1980s
by Dwayne A. Day Monday, April 19, 2021


The air-launched space shuttle in the AppleTV+ series "For All Mankind." From 1980-1983, the US Air Force hired several aerospace contractors including Pratt & Whitney, Rockwell, and Boeing, to study such a concept, although it never reached an advanced design phase. (credit: Apple TV+)

A recent episode of the AppleTV+ series “For All Mankind” featured a big reveal: an advanced space shuttle launched off the back of a C-5 Galaxy, headed for space on a military mission. It is a concept that has been around since the beginning of the shuttle program. In the early 1980s, the United States Air Force sponsored studies of what was initially designated a Space Sortie Vehicle, then renamed the Air Launched Sortie Vehicle, or ALSV. The ALSV would have launched into space off the back of a 747. In one early concept, the 747 would have been equipped with multiple rocket engines in its tail to boost it to launch altitude. Now, newly-acquired information indicates that Boeing conducted several studies of “Trans-Atmospheric Vehicles” in 1983, including a revised variant of the ALSV. This Sortie Vehicle, looking somewhat like a space shuttle orbiter that had been (lightly) stepped on by Godzilla, would have fired its own rocket engines while on top of the 747 and pushed both vehicles higher before separating the spacecraft to head into orbit.
https://www.thespacereview.com/article/4161/1

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« Odpowiedź #211 dnia: Kwiecień 20, 2021, 02:37 »
All in on Starship
by Jeff Foust Monday, April 19, 2021


NASA said it picked SpaceX’s Starship lunar lander, and only SpaceX, becaused on both the quality of the proposals it received and the limited funding available. (credit: SpaceX)

History will show that SpaceX won two contracts last week to land spacecraft on the Moon, but few may remember the first. On Tuesday, Astrobotic announced it selected SpaceX to launch its Griffin lunar lander in 2023. That lander will carry to the south pole of the Moon NASA’s Volatiles Investigating Polar Exploration Rover (VIPER) to search for deposits of water ice there. NASA awarded Astrobotic a contract worth nearly $200 million last year to launch VIPER through the agency’s Commercial Lunar Payload Services Program; Astrobotic did not disclose the terms of its contract with SpaceX, although the Falcon Heavy has a list price of $90 million.
https://www.thespacereview.com/article/4162/1

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« Odpowiedź #212 dnia: Kwiecień 27, 2021, 08:01 »
Review: Not Necessarily Rocket Science
by Jeff Foust Monday, April 26, 2021



Not Necessarily Rocket Science: A Beginner's Guide to Life in the Space Age
by Kellie Gerardi
Mango, 2020
hardcover, 256 pp.
ISBN 978-1-64250-410-1
US$19.95
https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1642504106/spaceviews

For decades, the message to students interested in pursuing career in space was simple: study science and math. That was the way to get a job as an engineer or scientist at companies or government agencies involved in space. That’s understandable, given the essential nature of those fields to launching satellites, but it was also something of an exclusionary message: if you weren’t interested in science and math, or just not good at it, then you were out of luck.
https://www.thespacereview.com/article/4163/1

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« Odpowiedź #213 dnia: Kwiecień 27, 2021, 08:02 »
Thanks, Dmitry!
by A.J. Mackenzie Monday, April 26, 2021


In 2014, Dmitry Rogozin, Russian deputy prime minister, made threats about access to RD-180 engines and Soyuz seats that prompted a series of changes in the US. Will comments by Russia’s current deputy prime minister about the future of ISS have a similar impact? (credit: Roscosmos)

Russian officials stated last week that Russia could quit the International Space Station as soon as 2025. One of those officials, deputy prime minister Yuri Borisov, claimed “technical malfunctions” were taking place there at an increasing rate, and that Russia should instead build its own national space station, perhaps by 2030.
https://www.thespacereview.com/article/4164/1

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« Odpowiedź #213 dnia: Kwiecień 27, 2021, 08:02 »

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« Odpowiedź #214 dnia: Kwiecień 27, 2021, 08:02 »
A message of continuity from NASA’s next administrator
by Jeff Foust Monday, April 26, 2021


Bill Nelson, the Biden Administration’s nominee to lead NASA, talks to his former colleagues on the Senate Commerce Committee during his confirmation hearing April 21. (credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

The last time the Senate Commerce Committee held a confirmation hearing for a NASA administrator nominee, Bill Nelson was not happy. As the top Democrat on the committee, the Florida senator used his opening remarks to make it clear he did not think the nominee, Jim Bridenstine, was the right person for the job. “While your time as a pilot, and your service to our country in the military is certainly commendable,” Nelson told Bridenstine, “it doesn’t make you qualified to make complex and nuanced engineering, safety, and budgetary decisions for which the head of NASA must be accountable.” (See “A contentious confirmation”, The Space Review, November 6, 2017.)
https://www.thespacereview.com/article/4165/1

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« Odpowiedź #215 dnia: Kwiecień 27, 2021, 08:03 »
With Starship, NASA is buying the Moon, but investing in Mars
by Casey Dreier and Jason Davis Monday, April 26, 2021


NASA’s selection of SpaceX’s Starship to send humans to the Moon could help both organizations go to Mars. (credit: SpaceX)

NASA’s selection of SpaceX’s Starship for a crewed lunar landing is the most consequential decision in the Artemis program to date, not just as a major step toward the Moon, but for the long-term implications of investing in a Mars spacecraft.
https://www.thespacereview.com/article/4166/1

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« Odpowiedź #216 dnia: Maj 04, 2021, 10:44 »
Review: A Man on the Moon
by Jeff Foust Monday, May 3, 2021



A Man on the Moon: The Voyages of the Apollo Astronauts
by Andrew Chaikin
The Folio Society, 2021
hardcover, 800 pp. (two volumes), illus.
US$225.00
https://www.foliosociety.com/usa/a-man-on-the-moon.html

The first copy of A Man on the Moon that I bought was when the book came out in 1994, timed to the 25th anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing. I got a copy at a Boston bookstore just in time for a talk its author, Andrew Chaikin, gave at Boston University shortly before the book rode a wave of popularity tied to the 25th anniversary and other events, like the movie Apollo 13 that came out a year later, leading to the HBO miniseries From the Earth to the Moon.
https://www.thespacereview.com/article/4167/1

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« Odpowiedź #217 dnia: Maj 04, 2021, 10:44 »
Don’t make space harder than it needs to be
by Matthew Jenkins Monday, May 3, 2021


Space Force Gen. Jay Raymond has made the case for his service to lawmakers, but the Space Force needs to inform the general public about the importance of space in order to win widespread support. (credit: US Air Force photo by Wayne Clark)

In February, White House press secretary Jen Psaki called the Space Force “the plane of today”—a reference to media interest in the paint scheme of the new Air Force One—when asked whether the new administration supported the United States Space Force. The good news is that she later provided a coherent answer. The Biden Administration fully supports the Space Force and is not revisiting its instantiation. Around the same time, the Chief of Space Operations, Gen. Jay Raymond, remark when asked about it that “it is hard to understand the link between what the Space Force does and how it affects U.S. citizens.”
https://www.thespacereview.com/article/4168/1

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« Odpowiedź #218 dnia: Maj 04, 2021, 10:46 »
The little Mars helicopter that could
by Jeff Foust Monday, May 3, 2021


The Mastcam-Z camera on the Perseverance rover captured this image of Ingenuity during its second flight on Mars April 22. (credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU/MSSS)

In the last decade, drones have become almost ubiquitous. They have found roles from providing aerial photography to delivery services to entertainment. You can go on Amazon and find a low-end quadcopter, with limited range and performance but still sporting high-definition cameras, for less than $100, and maybe under $50.
https://www.thespacereview.com/article/4169/

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« Odpowiedź #219 dnia: Maj 04, 2021, 10:46 »
Let’s take down the menace to our space dreams
by Alfred Anzaldúa Monday, May 3, 2021


The growing problem of space junk requires not just technical solutions for removing debris but also new legal, regulatory, and business models. (credit: ESA/Spacejunk3D, LLC)

In March, the retired NOAA-17 polar-orbiting weather satellite and the Chinese Yunhai 1-02 satellite both broke up in orbit. The former breakup created 16 pieces of trackable objects and the latter 21 pieces. Both were in polar orbits,[1] the most popular orbit in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) band from 200 to 2000 kilometers.[2] These trackable objects joined around 34,000 other trackable objects weighing 8,000 tons[3] larger than 10 centimeters in diameter and at least 128 million smaller pieces of untrackable debris able to shred a spacecraft.[4] Around 10,000 of the fragments were created by more than 250 collisions or explosions in orbit. Only 7% of the objects are functioning satellites.[5]
https://www.thespacereview.com/article/4170/1

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« Odpowiedź #219 dnia: Maj 04, 2021, 10:46 »