Autor Wątek: Artykuły o International Space Station (ISS)  (Przeczytany 479 razy)

0 użytkowników i 1 Gość przegląda ten wątek.

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 21638
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Artykuły o International Space Station (ISS)
« dnia: Marzec 04, 2022, 15:40 »
2021-2022

Crew-2 https://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=4413.msg157142#msg157142
Inspiration4 https://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=4471.msg161412#msg161412
Crew-3 https://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=4320.msg154676#msg154676
Axiom https://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=4123.msg145511#msg145511

Polaris Program https://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=4965.msg174416#msg174416

Soyuz MS-18 https://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=4462.msg160771#msg160771
Soyuz MS-19 https://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=4791.msg170181#msg170181
Soyuz MS-20 https://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=4584.msg164771#msg164771

Next-generation cargo Dragon https://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=4313.msg154451#msg154451
Progress MS https://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=4440.msg158799#msg158799
NG Cygnus https://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=4442.msg158948#msg158948
Nauka module https://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=4708.msg167689#msg167689

Other ISS partners start planning for extension to 2030
by Jeff Foust — January 9, 2022 [SN]


Officials with the Canadian Space Agency and Japanese space agency JAXA said that they will now consider extending their participation in the ISS to 2030 after the U.S. formally committed to an extension. Credit: NASA

WASHINGTON — The White House’s decision to extend operations of the International Space Station through the end of the decade is a “trigger” for other partners to make their own plans to continue participation in the station.

NASA announced Dec. 31 that the Biden administration agreed to continue operations of the ISS to 2030. Federal law, last updated in 2015, authorized operations of the station through at least 2024.
https://spacenews.com/other-iss-partners-start-planning-for-extension-to-2030/

Bigelow Aerospace transfers BEAM space station module to NASA
by Jeff Foust — January 21, 2022 [SN]


NASA took ownership of the BEAM inflatable module on the ISS from Bigelow Aerospace when Bigelow's engineering contract with NASA expired in December. Credit: NASA/Bigelow

WASHINGTON — NASA has hired a new company to provide engineering support for an inflatable module on the International Space Station originally built and managed by Bigelow Aerospace.

In a Jan. 18 procurement filing, NASA announced it awarded a $250,000 contract to ATA Engineering of San Diego, California, to provide engineering support services for the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM), an inflatable module added to the station in 2016. The module was built by Bigelow Aerospace, which had provided support for the module until December.
https://spacenews.com/bigelow-aerospace-transfers-beam-space-station-module-to-nasa/

Hewlett Packard Enterprise’s space station computer is in demand
by Debra Werner — January 24, 2022 [SN]


Mark Fernandez, principal investigator for Spaceborne Computer-2. Credit: HPE

Q&A with Mark Fernandez, principal investigator for HPE's Spaceborne Computer-2

Since traveling in February 2020 to the International Space Station, Spaceborne Computer-2 has completed 20 experiments focused on health care, communications, Earth observation and life sciences. Still, the queue for access to the off-the-shelf commercial computer linked to Microsoft’s Azure cloud keeps growing.
https://spacenews.com/hewlett-packard-enterprises-space-station-computer-is-in-demand/

Skycorp to test “USB for space” cable outside ISS
by Debra Werner — March 2, 2022 [SN]


Skycorp's Intelligent Space Systems Interface Flight Qualification Experiment traveled to the International Space Station in February on a Northrop Grumman Cygnus cargo vehicle. Astronauts have assembled the payload which is scheduled to be installed tomorrow on a space station external platform. Credit: NASA

SAN FRANCISCO – Skycorp Inc., a California company focused on orbital logistics, is preparing to test a key component of future satellite servicing vehicles on the International Space Station.

Within days testing will begin of the robotic connector developed by Germany’s iBoss GmbH to transmit power and data like a computer’s USB cable, alongside a Skycorp computer and a radiation sensor built by Space Environmental Technologies and jointly funded by the Defense Department and NASA Science Mission Directorate.
https://spacenews.com/skycorp-iss-connector-demonstration/

Russian cosmonaut secures U.S. visa after initial denial

NASA awards SpaceX three additional commercial crew missions
by Jeff Foust — March 3, 2022. Updated 5:30 p.m. Eastern with NASA comment on contract value.  [SN]


NASA will pay SpaceX more than $750 million for three additional Crew Dragon missions to the ISS. Credit: NASA

WASHINGTON — NASA ordered three more commercial crew missions to the International Space Station from SpaceX Feb. 28 at a price of more than three-quarters of a billion dollars.

Source: https://spacenews.com/nasa-awards-spacex-three-additional-commercial-crew-missions/

Space station operations remain normal despite geopolitical tensions
by Jeff Foust — March 15, 2022 [SN]


NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei will return to Earth March 30 on a Soyuz spacecraft, plans unchanged by Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Credit: NASA

WASHINGTON — Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has not affected operations of the International Space Station or plans for a NASA astronaut to return home on a Soyuz spacecraft late this month, according to agency officials.

At a March 14 briefing about a pair of upcoming spacewalks at the station, Joel Montalbano, NASA ISS program manager, emphasized repeatedly that the geopolitical tensions on Earth between Russia and the West have not extended to the ISS.

Source: https://spacenews.com/space-station-operations-remain-normal-despite-geopolitical-tensions/

NASA: Space station operations continue smoothly despite Ukraine invasion
March 14, 2022 William Harwood [SFN]
STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS & USED WITH PERMISSION


NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei inside the cupola at the International Space Station. The Soyuz MS-19 spacecraft, his ride back to Earth, is seen in the background. Credit: NASA

Despite Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and worsening relations, joint operation of the International Space Station continues normally with plans in place to bring NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei back to Earth as planned aboard a Russian Soyuz spacecraft at the end of the month, a senior NASA manager said Monday.

Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/03/14/nasa-says-space-station-operations-continue-smoothly-despite-ukraine-invasion/

Three-man Russian crew ready for launch to International Space Station
March 17, 2022 Stephen Clark [SFN]


Russian cosmonauts Sergey Korsakov, Oleg Artemyev, and Denis Matveev during a training session inside their Soyuz MS-21 spacecraft. Credit: Roscosmos

Three cosmonauts set to kick off a six-and-a-half month expedition in orbit will launch Friday on Russia’s first mission to the International Space Station since the country’s invasion of Ukraine.

A Soyuz rocket set to launch from Site 31 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:55 a.m. EDT (1555 GMT) with the Soyuz MS-21 spacecraft carrying veteran Russian cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev and rookie space fliers Denis Matveev and Sergey Korsakov.

Liftoff is set for 8:55 p.m. local time at Baikonur.

Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/03/17/three-man-russian-crew-ready-for-launch-to-international-space-station/

Soyuz carries three cosmonauts to station as Nelson touts cooperation
March 18, 2022 William Harwood STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS & USED WITH PERMISSION [SFN]


With the arrival of three new cosmonauts, the International Space Station is home to a crew of 10 through March 30. Credit: Roscosmos

Three cosmonauts blasted off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan Friday, caught up with the International Space Station after a two-orbit rendezvous and moved in for docking at a newly arrived Russian module. The cosmonauts are replacing three crew members — two Russians and an American — who are heading home at the end of the month to close out a record-setting flight.

Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/03/18/soyuz-carries-three-cosmonauts-to-station-as-nelson-touts-cooperation/

SpaceX’s new Dragon spaceship named ‘Freedom’
March 25, 2022 Stephen Clark [SFN]


NASA astronaut Jessica Watkins, pilot Bob Hines, commander Kjell Lindgren, and European Space Agency astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti pose with SpaceX’s Crew Dragon Freedom spacecraft. Credit: SpaceX

SpaceX’s fourth human-rated Crew Dragon spacecraft has been named “Freedom” by the first team of astronauts who will ride it into orbit next month.

Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/03/25/spacexs-new-dragon-spaceship-named-freedom/

U of U Health experiment prepared for launch to International Space Station
MARCH 29, 2022 Doug Dollemore science writer, Science Communications, University of Utah Health [attheu.utah]

The perils of space flight often seem as boundless as the universe around us. From blastoff to splashdown, astronauts are exposed to a withering array of health hazards, including exposure to cosmic radiation, loss of muscle mass, lowered immunity, high blood pressure and increased risk of infections that can have lingering effects.

Source: https://attheu.utah.edu/uncategorized/u-of-u-health-experiment-prepared-for-launch-to-international-space-station/

NASA astronaut, two cosmonauts set for Wednesday return to Earth
March 29, 2022 William Harwood STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS & USED WITH PERMISSION  [SFN]


NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei in his Russian Sokol launch and entry spacesuit. Credit: NASA

NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei, launched by Russia to the International Space Station aboard a Soyuz spacecraft last April, returns this week to a world torn by war in Ukraine and escalating superpower tension as he closes out a 355-day stay in orbit, the longest single flight by a U.S. astronaut.

Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/03/29/nasa-astronaut-two-cosmonauts-set-for-wednesday-return-to-earth/

Soyuz returns astronaut and cosmonauts from space station
by Jeff Foust — March 30, 2022 [SN]


The Soyuz MS-19 capsule seconds before touching down in Kazakhstan, returning a NASA astronaut and two Roscosmos cosmonauts. Credit: NASA TV

WASHINGTON — A Soyuz spacecraft carrying an American astronaut and two Russian cosmonauts landed in Kazakhstan March 30, an ordinary end of a mission in extraordinary times.

The Soyuz MS-19 spacecraft landed in the designated landing zone in Kazakhstan at 7:28 a.m. Eastern, four hours after undocking from the International Space Station. The landing appeared to go as planned, with the Soyuz commander, Anton Shkaplerov, saying “we’re feeling great” as the Soyuz descended.

Source: https://spacenews.com/soyuz-returns-astronaut-and-cosmonauts-from-space-station/

Vande Hei, Crewmates Back Home After Longest Single U.S. Human Space Mission
by Ben Evans March 30, 2022 [AS]


Less than a year before his selection into NASA’s Astronaut Corps, Mark Vande Hei is pictured at his console in Mission Control during the STS-126 shuttle mission. Photo Credit: NASA

Ten days shy of a full year since he departed Earth, NASA’s Mark Vande Hei is safely back on terra firma, following Wednesday’s successful landing of Soyuz MS-19 on the desolate steppe of south-central Kazakhstan. Riding shoulder-to-shoulder with Russian cosmonauts Anton Shkaplerov and his one-year buddy Pyotr Dubrov, Vande Hei wrapped up America’s longest single human spaceflight, smashing Scott Kelly’s earlier 340-day record from his 2015-2016 “One Year Mission”. With Soyuz MS-19’s safe return, Vande Hei has now logged 355 days, three hours and 45 minutes in space, since his launch last 9 April.

Source: https://www.americaspace.com/2022/03/30/vande-hei-crewmates-back-home-after-longest-single-u-s-human-space-mission/

NASA astronaut ends record-long, 355-day spaceflight at ISS, returns to Earth in Russian capsule
Marcia Dunn March 30, 2022  |  Associated Press [FT]

(...) Despite escalating tensions between the U.S. and Russia over Vladimir Putin's war with Ukraine, Vande Hei's return followed customary procedures. A small NASA team of doctors and other staff was on hand for the touchdown and planned to return immediately to Houston with the 55-year-old astronaut.

Even before Russia's Feb. 24 invasion of Ukraine, Vande Hei said he was avoiding the subject with his two Russian crewmates. Despite getting along "fantastically ... I'm not sure we really want to go there," he said.

Source: https://eu.floridatoday.com/story/news/nation/2022/03/30/us-astronaut-returns-earth-after-record-breaking-trip-iss/7215779001/

NASA astronaut back on Earth after record-setting flight
March 30, 2022 William Harwood STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS & USED WITH PERMISSION [SFN]


NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei gives a thumbs-up after landing in Kazakhstan, closing out 355 days in space. Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

(...) In any case, Vande Hei downplayed the new U.S. record before leaving the space station, saying “I don’t think it’s a record that I would even attribute to me, it’s a record for our space program.”

“I have a tremendous amount of respect for Scott and Christina, both,” he said in a NASA interview. “And I know they would both be extremely happy, as the explorers that they are, to see that we’re furthering exploration, we’re getting people into space for longer and longer periods of time.”

After a two-hour flight aboard a Russian helicopter to an airport in Karaganda, Vande Hei faced a long flight back to his home in Houston aboard a NASA jet while Shkaplerov and Dubrov headed home to the cosmonaut training center in Star City near Moscow.

Like all space station astronauts, Vande Hei spent two hours a day working out with resistive weights, strapped onto a zero-gravity treadmill or riding in place on an exercise bike. (...)

Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/03/30/record-setting-nasa-astronaut-back-on-earth-after-record-setting-flight/

https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/03/30/soyuz-ms-19-landing-mission-status-center/

NASA still working with Russia on ISS seat barter agreement
by Jeff Foust — April 1, 2022 [SN]


Future private astronaut missions to the International Space Station, flying on vehicles like SpaceX’s Crew Dragon (above), will be charged higher prices by NASA to reflect the true cost of supporting those visits. Credit: NASA

WASHINGTON — NASA officials say they are still hopeful to complete a seat barter agreement with Russia in time to allow an exchange of seats on missions this fall despite the tensions between Russia and the West.

At briefings March 31 about the upcoming Crew-4 Crew Dragon mission to the International Space Station, scheduled for launch April 20, agency officials said they were still waiting for Roscosmos and Russia’s foreign ministry to approve an agreement that would allow Russian cosmonauts to fly on commercial crew vehicles in exchange for NASA astronauts flying on Soyuz spacecraft to the station.

Source: https://spacenews.com/nasa-still-working-with-russia-on-iss-seat-barter-agreement/

Rogozin delays decision on space station future
by Jeff Foust — April 3, 2022 [SN]


Dmitry Rogozin (right), seen here with Vladimir Putin in 2019, said April 2 he would make recommendations in the "near future" on Russia's continued participation in the ISS, but made no immediate changes to the partnership. Credit: Kremlin.ru

DENVER — After Western nations refused his demand to end sanctions on Russian companies involved in the International Space Station, the head of Roscosmos said he will make recommendations in the “near future” on Russia’s continued participation in the station, but there are no signs of any near-term changes in station operations.

Dmitry Rogozin had set a March 31 deadline for the United States and other Western nations to lift sanctions on two Russian companies, TsNIMash and Rocket and Space Centre Progress, that support ISS operations. Rogozin warned in March he would make a decision of some kind if sanctions were not lifted, but declined to elaborate on the decision.
https://spacenews.com/rogozin-delays-decision-on-space-station-future/
« Ostatnia zmiana: Czerwiec 05, 2022, 09:19 wysłana przez Orionid »

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 21638
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Artykuły o International Space Station (ISS)
« Odpowiedź #1 dnia: Marzec 06, 2022, 07:17 »
Vande Hei Discusses Longest Single U.S. Human Space Mission
by Ben Evans April 5, 2022 [AS]


Mark Vande Hei works on the Cardinal Muscle experiment in August 2021. Photo Credit: NASA

Less than a week after wrapping up the longest single space mission ever undertaken by a U.S. astronaut, Mark Vande Hei took time early Tuesday to discuss his record-setting 355-day increment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Vande Hei returned to Earth on 30 March aboard the Soyuz MS-19 spacecraft, shoulder-to-shoulder with Russian cosmonauts Anton Shkaplerov and Pyotr Dubrov. The trio—with Dubrov having also spent 355 days in space with Vande Hei, as Shkaplerov concluded a 176-day mission—alighted on the desolate steppe of south-central Kazakhstan, about 90 miles (150 kilometres) from the remote town of Jezkazgan.
https://www.americaspace.com/2022/04/05/vande-hei-discusses-longest-single-u-s-human-space-mission/

SpaceX rolls out Falcon 9 rocket for next NASA crew launch
April 19, 2022 Stephen Clark [SFN]


SpaceX rolls a Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon crew spacecraft out of the hangar at pad 39A Tuesday morning. Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky

SpaceX rolled a reused Falcon 9 booster and a brand new Dragon crew capsule to their launch pad for final tests Tuesday at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a day after the astronauts who will ride the spacecraft to the space station arrived for pre-flight preparations.
https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/04/19/spacex-rolls-out-falcon-9-rocket-for-next-nasa-crew-launch/

Axiom’s private crew gets extra time on space station after landing delay
April 20, 2022 Stephen Clark [SFN]


The 11-person crew currently on-board the International Space Station, including the Ax-1 commercial astronauts wearing blue flight suits. Credit: NASA TV / Spaceflight Now

The four-man crew flying on Axiom’s first private mission to the International Space Station is getting some extra time on the orbiting complex this week. Managers have extended their stay until at least Thursday night due to bad weather in SpaceX’s splashdown zones off the coast of Florida.
https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/04/20/axioms-private-astronaut-crew-gets-extra-time-on-space-station-after-weather-delays-landing/

Next SpaceX crew launch on hold to wait for return of private astronaut mission
April 20, 2022 Stephen Clark [SFN]


Astronauts Jessica Watkins, Bob Hines, Kjell Lindgren, and Samantha Cristoforetti inside the Crew Access Arm at Launch Complex 39A early Wednesday for a dress rehearsal. Credit: SpaceX

The launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the next crew to the International Space Station has been postponed from Saturday, a ripple effect from weather delays in returning a team of commercial astronauts from the outpost back to Earth, NASA officials said Wednesday.
https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/04/20/crew-4-delayed-to-wait-for-ax-1-return/

Astronauts Arrive for Crew-4 Launch to Space Station Saturday
by Mike Killian April 19, 2022 [AS]


NASA astronauts Kjell Lindgren, Robert Hines, Jessica Watkins, and European Space Agency astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, all smiles after landing at Kennedy Space Center for their launch to the International Space Station on the Crew-4 mission with SpaceX on April 23. Photo: Jeff Seibert / AmericaSpace

NASA astronauts Kjell Lindgren, Robert Hines, Jessica Watkins, and European astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti arrived at Kennedy Space Center yesterday (April 18) for their launch to the International Space Station. Dubbed ’Crew 4’, the mission is set to blast off from pad 39A on a SpaceX Crew Dragon and Falcon 9 rocket on April 23 at 5:26 a.m. EDT.
https://www.americaspace.com/2022/04/19/astronauts-arrive-for-crew-4-launch-to-space-station-saturday/

NASA expects decisions on ISS crew swaps by June
by Jeff Foust — April 26, 2022 [SN]


NASA Administrator BIll Nelson said April 26 he remained confident that Russia would remain a partner on the International Space Station for the long term. Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky

WASHINGTON — NASA says it expects to know by June whether a Russian cosmonaut will fly on a Crew Dragon mission in September in exchange for a NASA astronaut flying on a Soyuz, as the agency’s leadership continues to express optimism about long-term cooperation with Russia on the space station.
https://spacenews.com/nasa-expects-decisions-on-iss-crew-swaps-by-june/

Falcon 9 launches Crew-4 mission to space station
by Jeff Foust — April 27, 2022 [SN]


A Falcon 9 lifts off April 27 on the Crew-4 mission to the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani

WASHINGTON — Four American and European astronauts are on their way to the International Space Station after their launch on a Crew Dragon spacecraft April 27, less than two days after another spacecraft returned from the station.
https://spacenews.com/falcon-9-launches-crew-4-mission-to-space-station/

Crew-4 arrives at ISS
by Jeff Foust — April 28, 2022 [SN]


A SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft docks with the ISS April 27, less than 16 hours after liftoff from Florida. Credit: NASA TV

WASHINGTON — A Crew Dragon spacecraft docked with the International Space Station with a new set of American and European astronauts April 27.

The Crew Dragon spacecraft Freedom docked with the station at 7:37 p.m. Eastern. Hatches separating the spacecraft and station opened about an hour and a half later.
https://spacenews.com/crew-4-arrives-at-iss/

Emirati astronaut to fly long-duration space station mission
by Jeff Foust — April 30, 2022 [SN]


Salem AlMarri (seated left), director general of the Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre, and Michael Suffredini (seated right), president and CEO of Axiom Space, at a signing ceremony for a contract where Axiom will fly an Emirati astronaut on a commercial crew mission in 2023. Credit: Dubai Media Office

WASHINGTON — The United Arab Emirates will fly an astronaut on a long-duration mission to the International Space Station through an agreement with Axiom Space.
https://spacenews.com/emirati-astronaut-to-fly-long-duration-space-station-mission/

ISS partnership feeling some effects of sanctions on Russia
by Jeff Foust — May 13, 2022 [SN]


While day-to-day operations of the ISS continue without "serious interruptions," there are some impacts for NASA personnel in Russia created by sanctions against the country. Credit: NASA

WASHINGTON — While operations of the International Space Station continue without “serious interruptions,” sanctions on Russia for its invasion of Ukraine are starting to have an effect on some activities, NASA’s safety advisers said.

At a May 12 meeting of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP), members reiterated past comments by agency officials that the day-to-day operations of the ISS have continued despite Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February and subsequent sanctions imposed on Russia by the other countries in the ISS partnership.
https://spacenews.com/iss-partnership-feeling-some-effects-of-sanctions-on-russia/

NASA plans to make Starliner crew assignments this summer
by Jeff Foust — May 23, 2022 [SN]


NASA astronauts (from left) Butch Wilmore, Mike Fincke and Suni Williams said before the launch of OFT-2 that they were training together on Starliner systems as a “cadre” and could be assigned to the vehicle crewed test flight or a later mission. Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky

WASHINGTON — As Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner prepares to return from its brief trip to the International Space Station, NASA officials say they’ll wait until this summer to determine the schedule for the vehicle’s first crewed flight and the astronauts who will fly it.

NASA said May 23 it would proceed with plans to have Starliner return to earth May 25, six days after its launch on the Orbital Flight Test (OFT) 2 uncrewed mission. The astronauts on the ISS will close Starliner’s hatch May 24, with undocking about 24 hours later at 2:36 p.m. Eastern May 25. That would allow Starliner to land at White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico at 6:49 p.m. Eastern that day.
https://spacenews.com/nasa-plans-to-make-starliner-crew-assignments-this-summer/

SpaceX swapping heat shield for next crew flight due to ‘manufacturing defect’
May 24, 2022 Stephen Clark [SFN]


SpaceX’s Dragon Endurance spacecraft after splashdown May 6, with its heat shield displayed toward the camera. Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani

SpaceX’s next crew mission to the International Space Station, set for launch in September, will fly with a different heat shield structure than originally planned after a composite substrate failed in acceptance testing due to a “manufacturing defect,” NASA said Tuesday.

The heat shield’s 13-foot-diameter (4-meter) composite structure — located at the bottom, blunt end of the Dragon capsule — is detachable and interchangeable between the reusable spacecraft in SpaceX’s Dragon fleet. SpaceX installs thermal protection tiles on the composite structure to protect the spacecraft from the searing heat of atmospheric re-entry at the end of each mission.
https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/05/24/spacex-swapping-heat-shield-for-next-crew-mission-due-to-manufacturing-defect/

SpaceX replacing heat shield on upcoming Crew Dragon mission after failed test
by Jeff Foust — May 26, 2022 [SN]


A Crew Dragon spacecraft just before splashdown on the Ax-1 mission in April. NASA says that, contrary to a published report, there was no excessive wear to its heat shield. Credit: Axiom Space

WASHINGTON — SpaceX will replace the heat shield on the next Crew Dragon spacecraft flying to the International Space Station after it failed inspections, but NASA says there is no risk of a similar problem for the spacecraft currently at the station.

In a May 24 statement to reporters, NASA said that a heat shield structure that SpaceX built for the Crew-5 mission to the station, slated to launch in early September, failed an acceptance test earlier this month and will not be used on that spacecraft.
https://spacenews.com/spacex-replacing-heat-shield-on-upcoming-crew-dragon-mission-after-failed-test/

NASA to buy five additional Crew Dragon flights
by Jeff Foust — June 2, 2022 [SN]


The Crew Dragon spacecraft Endeavour, with the Crew-2 astronauts on board, seen from the International Space Station shortly after undocking Nov. 8. Credit: NASA

WASHINGTON — NASA is planning to purchase five more Crew Dragon missions to the International Space Station from SpaceX, a move the agency says is needed to ensure long-term access to the station.

In a procurement notice published June 1, NASA announced its intent to issue a sole-source modification of its existing Commercial Crew Transportation Capabilities, or CCtCap, contract with SpaceX to add five missions to the station later this decade.
https://spacenews.com/nasa-to-buy-five-additional-crew-dragon-flights/

Russian Soyuz rocket launches with space station cargo freighter
June 3, 2022 Stephen Clark [SFN]


A Soyuz-2.1a rocket stands on the launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan after rollout Tuesday. Credit: Roscosmos

Russia’s Progress MS-20 cargo freighter lifted off Friday on a fast-track, three-and-a-half hour rendezvous with the International Space Station to deliver around three tons of fuel, food, and supplies for the lab’s seven-person crew.

The Progress supply ship launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 5:32 a.m. EDT (0932 GMT) aboard a Soyuz-2.1a rocket. Russian ground crews rolled the Soyuz booster to the launch pad at Site 31 early Tuesday, then raised it vertical into liftoff position over the pad’s cavernous flame trench.
https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/06/03/soyuz-progress-ms-20-launch-docking/

Cargo Dragon mission postponed to investigate potential propellant leak
by Jeff Foust — June 6, 2022 [SN]


A cargo Dragon spacecraft docked to the International Space Station earlier this year, with several of its Draco thrusters visible. Credit: NASA

WASHINGTON — NASA and SpaceX have postponed the launch of a cargo Dragon mission to the International Space Station after discovering a potential propellant leak in the spacecraft’s thrusters.

In a statement late June 6, NASA said the launch of the CRS-25 mission, which had been scheduled for June 10, would be postponed after detecting “elevated vapor readings” of monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) in a portion of the spacecraft’s Draco thruster system. The cause of the elevated reading is under investigation.
https://spacenews.com/cargo-dragon-mission-postponed-to-investigate-potential-propellant-leak/

SpaceX cargo mission grounded to investigate possible fuel leak
June 6, 2022 Stephen Clark EDITOR’S NOTE: Updated June 7 with no “no earlier than” launch date of June 28. [SN]


A SpaceX Dragon cargo ship approaches the International Space Station on Aug. 30, 2021. Credit: NASA

SpaceX has postponed this week’s planned launch of a Dragon cargo mission to the International Space Station to investigate a possible leak detected during fueling of the spacecraft at Cape Canaveral, pushing the flight until no earlier than late June.

The Dragon spacecraft was scheduled for launch Friday morning from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Officials have not set a new target launch date for the SpaceX resupply mission, but a NASA spokesperson confirmed it would not occur Friday or Saturday.
https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/06/06/spacex-cargo-mission-grounded-to-investigate-possible-fuel-leak/

NASA to purchase five more Dragon crew missions from SpaceX
June 10, 2022 Stephen Clark [SFN]


SpaceX’s Dragon Freedom spacecraft is seen docked at the International Space Station in this May 21 photo. Credit: NASA

NASA says it plans to buy five more crew rotation missions on SpaceX’s fleet of Dragon spaceships, bringing SpaceX’s contract with the space agency to 14 operational astronaut launches, likely enough to keep the International Space Station staffed through 2030.

The five additional Dragon missions help ensure NASA maintains two independent crew transpiration providers, with SpaceX and Boeing alternating astronaut missions every six months once the agency certifies Boeing’s Starliner capsule for the job, the agency said in a June 1 statement.
https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/06/10/nasa-to-purchase-five-more-dragon-crew-missions-from-spacex/

GAO finds CASIS not making full use of advisory committee
by Jeff Foust — June 13, 2022 [SN]


The GAO found that CASIS was not making full use of an advisory committee established after an independent review of its management of the ISS national lab. Credit: NASA

ARCADIA, Calif. — The nonprofit that runs the national laboratory portion of the International Space Station is not making full use of the advisory group established after an independent review of the organization.

A report published by the Government Accountability Office June 7 said that the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), which manages the resources of the ISS designated as a national laboratory, was not providing its User Advisory Committee (UAC) with information on how the lab was being used or seeking input from the committee on resource allocations.
https://spacenews.com/gao-finds-casis-not-making-full-use-of-advisory-committee/

Cargo Dragon launch rescheduled for July after identifying hydrazine leak
by Jeff Foust — June 14, 2022 [SN]


A cargo Dragon spacecraft docked to the International Space Station earlier this year, with several of its Draco thrusters visible. Credit: NASA

ARCADIA, Calif. — A SpaceX cargo Dragon mission to the International Space Station will now launch no earlier than July 11, a delay of more than a month after engineers identified the source of elevated hydrazine readings in the spacecraft.

In a statement late June 13, NASA said that agency officials met with SpaceX to discuss the status of the investigation into elevated vapor readings of monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) detected earlier this month after the spacecraft was fueled ahead of a launch then planned for June 10. The readings, the sign of a potential leak in the vehicle’s Draco thrusters, prompted a launch delay announced June 6.
https://spacenews.com/cargo-dragon-launch-rescheduled-for-july-after-identifying-hydrazine-leak/
« Ostatnia zmiana: Czerwiec 15, 2022, 02:06 wysłana przez Orionid »

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 21638
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Artykuły o International Space Station (ISS)
« Odpowiedź #2 dnia: Lipiec 03, 2022, 04:41 »
NG-17 Cygnus Departs Space Station, Wraps Up Four-Month Stay
by Ben Evans June 28, 2022 [AS]


The NG-17 Cygnus cargo ship departed the International Space Station (ISS) early Tuesday, after four months attached to the sprawling orbital complex. Photo Credit: NASA

After being part of the International Space Station (ISS) for over four months, Northrop Grumman Corp.’s NG-17 Cygnus cargo ship—named in honor of the late shuttle astronaut and environmental scientist Piers Sellers—departed the orbital outpost early Tuesday, bound for a destructive re-entry later this week. Cygnus was robotically detached from its berth on the Earth-facing (or “nadir”) port of the station’s Unity node overnight and, an hour later than originally intended, was set into free flight at 7:07 a.m. Tuesday. Laden with unneeded equipment and trash, Cygnus will harmlessly burn up in Earth’s atmosphere, high above the Pacific Ocean, on Wednesday, 29 June.
https://www.americaspace.com/2022/06/28/ng-17-cygnus-departs-space-station-wraps-up-four-month-stay/

Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus supply ship departs space station
June 28, 2022 Stephen Clark [SFN]


Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus spacecraft perched on the end of the International Space Station’s robotic arm before release Tuesday. Credit: NASA/ESA/Samantha Cristoforetti

A commercial Cygnus supply ship from Northrop Grumman departed the International Space Station Tuesday, completing a four-month stay after delivering more than 8,000 pounds of cargo and boosting the research lab into a slightly higher orbit.
https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/06/28/ng-17-iss-departure/

NASA and Roscosmos continue seat barter discussions
by Jeff Foust — July 2, 2022 [SN]


Roscosmos cosmonaut Anna Kikina continues training for a flight to the ISS on a Crew Dragon spacecraft in September despite not having a seat barter agreement finalized. Credit: Roscosmos

WASHINGTON — NASA is continuing to work with Roscosmos on a seat barter agreement despite missing a self-imposed deadline last month to complete a deal in time to allow exchanges on missions launching this fall.
https://spacenews.com/nasa-and-roscosmos-continue-seat-barter-discussions/

NASA criticizes Russia for using space station to promote invasion of Ukraine
by Jeff Foust — July 7, 2022 [SN]


Russian cosmonauts Sergey Korsakov, Oleg Artemyev and Denis Matveev display a flag of the disputed Luhansk People’s Republic, a region of Ukraine occupied by Russian forces, on the ISS July 4. Credit: Roscosmos

WASHINGTON — NASA strongly criticized Russia for using the International Space Station to promote its invasion of Ukraine, a break from the agency’s approach of emphasizing ongoing cooperation despite the war.

In a statement late July 7, NASA said it “strongly rebukes” Russia for political activity on the station related to Russia’s ongoing invasion of Ukraine. The brief statement did not specify what incident prompted the statement.
https://spacenews.com/nasa-criticizes-russia-for-using-space-station-to-promote-invasion-of-ukraine/

Japanese startup to demo robotic arm onboard ISS in 2023
by Jason Rainbow — July 11, 2022 [SN]


GITAI aims to autonomously execute in-space servicing, assembly, and manufacturing with its S2 robotic arm system in the vacuum of space. Credit: GITAI

TAMPA, Fla. — Japanese startup GITAI plans to demonstrate robotic arm capabilities externally on the International Space Station for the first time next year.

GITAI said July 11 its autonomous, 1.5-meter-long dual robotic arm system (S2) would be mounted on the Bishop Airlock, a module funded by U.S.-based Nanoracks.

The startup aims to achieve NASA’s Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 7 from the demonstration, confirming its feasibility as a technology that could be used in space.
https://spacenews.com/japanese-startup-to-demo-robotic-arm-onboard-iss-in-2023/

NASA and Roscosmos nearing completion of seat barter agreement
by Jeff Foust — July 14, 2022 [SN]


NASA says Roscosmos cosmonaut Anna Kikina continues training for a flight to the ISS on a Crew Dragon spacecraft in September as the two agencies finalize a seat barter agreement. Credit: Roscosmos

WASHINGTON — NASA and Roscosmos are in the final stages of completing a long-awaited agreement to allow Russian cosmonauts to fly on commercial crew vehicles and American astronauts on Soyuz spacecraft.

At a July 13 briefing about the upcoming launch of a SpaceX cargo Dragon spacecraft to the International Space Station, Dana Weigel, NASA ISS deputy program manager, said the agencies were “pretty close” to finalizing an agreement that would allow seat swaps starting with Crew Dragon and Soyuz missions launching in September.
https://spacenews.com/nasa-and-roscosmos-nearing-completion-of-seat-barter-agreement/

NASA division proposing program to send scientists to ISS
by Jeff Foust — July 14, 2022 [SN]


Larry Connor, a private astronaut on Axiom Space’s Ax-1 mission, performing an experiment on the ISS in April. A NASA program seeks to send “hyper-specialized” scientists to the station on future private missions for research that could then be handed over to NASA astronauts. Credit: Eytan Stibbe/Axiom Space

WASHINGTON — A NASA science division is seeking funding for a program that could fly scientists to the International Space Station on private missions to conduct research that could then be handed off to NASA astronauts.

In a presentation at a July 13 meeting of a National Academies committee working on the decadal survey for biological and physical sciences research in space, Craig Kundrot, director of the NASA’s biological and physical sciences division, said the agency is seeking funding starting in fiscal year 2023 for an initiative that could allow “hyper-specialized” scientists go to the ISS and future commercial space stations.
https://spacenews.com/nasa-division-proposing-program-to-send-scientists-to-iss/

SpaceX ready to launch space station resupply mission after five-week delay
July 14, 2022 Stephen Clark [SFN]


SpaceX’s Cargo Dragon spacecraft and Falcon 9 rocket roll out to pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida ahead of launch of the company’s 25th cargo mission to the International Space Station. Credit: SpaceX

SpaceX is set to launch its 25th resupply mission to the International Space Station Thursday night from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, following a five-week delay to resolve a leak in the Dragon cargo capsule’s propulsion system.
https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/07/14/spacex-ready-to-launch-space-station-resupply-mission-after-five-week-delay/

SpaceX launches cargo Dragon mission to ISS
by Jeff Foust — July 14, 2022 [SN]


A SpaceX Falcon 9 lifts off July 14 carrying the CRS-25 cargo Dragon spacecraft, bound for the ISS. Credit: NASA TV

WASHINGTON — A SpaceX cargo Dragon spacecraft is on its way to the International Space Station after a July 14 launch delayed more than a month by a hydrazine leak on the spacecraft.

A Falcon 9 lifted off from Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A at 8:44 p.m. Eastern, deploying the Dragon into low Earth orbit 12 minutes later. The spacecraft is scheduled to dock with the station at about 11:20 a.m. Eastern July 16.
https://spacenews.com/spacex-launches-cargo-dragon-mission-to-iss/

Rogozin removed as head of Roscosmos as seat barter agreement signed
by Jeff Foust — July 15, 2022 [SN]


Dmity Rogozin (right) with Russian President Vladimir Putin in 2018. The Kremlin dismissed Rogozin as head of Roscosmos July 15 but may consider him for other positions in the government, Credit: Kremlin.ru

WASHINGTON — The Russian government dismissed Dmitry Rogozin as the head of the space agency Roscosmos July 15, the same day the agency and NASA signed a long-anticipated agreement to exchange seats on flights to the International Space Station.

In a brief statement, the Kremlin announced the Vladimir Putin, president of Russia, had dismissed Rogozin as head of Roscosmos, effective immediately. In a separate statement, the Kremlin announced the appointment of Yuri Borisov, deputy prime minister of Russia, as Rogozin’s successor at Roscosmos.
https://spacenews.com/rogozin-removed-as-head-of-roscosmos-as-seat-barter-agreement-signed/

Russian space chief dismissed; NASA gets deal for joint crews
July 15, 2022 William Harwood  STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS & USED WITH PERMISSION  [SN]


File photo of a previous meeting between Russian President Vladimir Putin and Dmitry Rogozin. Credit: Kremlin

Dmitry Rogozin, the bellicose director of the Russian space agency Roscosmos who has railed against NASA and its western space allies over sanctions imposed in the wake of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, is stepping down under orders from President Vladimir Putin.
https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/07/15/russian-space-chief-dismissed-nasa-gets-deal-for-joint-crews/

Millennium Space reveals results of DARPA’s ‘Red-Eye’ smallsat experiment
by Sandra Erwin — July 20, 2022 [SN]

Red-Eye satellite viewed from the International Space Station. Credit: Millennium Space Systems

The three-satellite experiment, launched from the ISS in 2019 and 2020, demonstrated on-board data processing and crosslink communications

WASHINGTON — Millennium Space executives on July 20 revealed the results of a two-year experiment involving three small satellites launched in 2019 and 2020 from the International Space Station.
https://spacenews.com/millennium-space-reveals-results-of-darpas-red-eye-smallsat-experiment/

Supply chain issues delay Northrop Grumman’s next space station cargo flight
July 19, 2022 Stephen Clark [SN]


A Northrop Grumman Cygnus spacecraft in the grip of the International Space Station’s Canadian-built robotic arm June 28, just prior to the cargo freighter’ departure. Credit: NASA

Northrop Grumman’s next resupply flight to the International Space Station has been delayed from mid-August to mid-October by supply chain issues, a company spokesperson said Tuesday.

The 18th flight of a Northrop Grumman Cygnus spacecraft to the space station, known as NG-18, will launch on an Antares rocket from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport in Virginia. NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services contract with Northrop Grumman extends through the NG-25 mission scheduled for 2026.
https://spacenews.com/millennium-space-reveals-results-of-darpas-red-eye-smallsat-experiment/

Crew Dragon mission delayed after booster damaged in transport
by Jeff Foust — July 21, 2022 [SN]


The launch of the Crew-4 commercial crew mission in April. The Crew-5 launch has slipped from early September to no earlier than Sept. 29 after the booster was damaged during cross-country transport. Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani

WASHINGTON — NASA is delaying the next commercial crew mission to the International Space Station by nearly a month after the Falcon 9 booster that will launch it was damaged during transport across the country for testing.

NASA announced July 21 that the Crew-5 mission is now scheduled for launch no earlier than Sept. 29, after previously being scheduled for early September. The spacecraft will transport NASA astronauts Nicole Mann and Josh Cassada, JAXA astronaut Koichi Wakata and Roscosmos cosmonaut Anna Kikina to the station.
https://spacenews.com/crew-dragon-mission-delayed-after-booster-damaged-in-transport/
« Ostatnia zmiana: Sierpień 21, 2022, 09:21 wysłana przez Orionid »

Polskie Forum Astronautyczne

Odp: Artykuły o International Space Station (ISS)
« Odpowiedź #2 dnia: Lipiec 03, 2022, 04:41 »