Autor Wątek: Artykuły o Satellite operations  (Przeczytany 201 razy)

0 użytkowników i 1 Gość przegląda ten wątek.

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 21638
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Artykuły o Satellite operations
« dnia: Luty 19, 2022, 06:19 »
Orbit Fab secures deal to refuel Astroscale’s satellite-servicing robots
by Sandra Erwin — January 11, 2022 [SN]


Visualization of Astroscale’s geostationary satellite servicing spacecraft known as LEXI, short for Life Extension In-Orbit. Credit: Astroscale

WASHINGTON — Astroscale U.S., a provider of on-orbit services to extend the life of satellites, has signed an agreement to use Orbit Fab’s in-space refueling tankers, the companies announced Jan. 11.

Orbit Fab, a startup offering “gas stations in space,” will refuel Astroscale’s geostationary satellite servicing spacecraft known as LEXI, short for Life Extension In-Orbit.

The agreement commits Orbit Fab to supply up to 1,000 kilograms of Xenon propellant to refuel Astroscale’s LEXI vehicles, the first of which is projected to launch in 2026.
https://spacenews.com/orbit-fab-secures-deal-to-refuel-astroscales-in-space-servicing-robots/

Atomos Space secures funding to develop space tug business
by Jason Rainbow — January 12, 2022 [SN]


An artist's view of the Quark OTV that Atomos Space aims to deploy in 2023. Credit: Atomos Space

TAMPA, Fla. — Denver-based startup Atomos Space announced Jan. 12 it has raised the $5 million it had first sought in 2020 to develop its space-tug business, following an investment from early-stage investor Cantos Ventures.

Cantos joined an undisclosed aerospace investor in the funding round, which the startup said paves the way for launching its first two spacecraft in 2023.
https://spacenews.com/atomos-space-secures-funding-to-develop-space-tug-business/

Phase Four and Orbit Fab to work on Maxwell engine refueling
by Debra Werner — January 24, 2022 [SN]


Phase Four's Second Generation RF Thruster, Maxwell Block 2, firing in one of the company's vacuum chambers. Credit: Phase Four

SAN FRANCISCO — Propulsion startup Phase Four has signed a memorandum of understanding with satellite refueling startup Orbit Fab aimed at preparing future Phase Four Maxwell engines for on-orbit refueling.

“As we build and deliver an increasing number of Maxwell engines to customers, we want to be forward-looking for mission lifetime extension services such as in-orbit refueling,” said Phase Four CEO Beau Jarvis said in a statement. Working with Orbit Fab “is an obvious step” for Phase Four to ensure “future customers have the option to refuel their spacecraft and extend mission lifetime,” Jarvis added.
https://spacenews.com/phase-four-and-orbit-fab-maxwell-mou/

White House official: Norms needed for ‘satellite to satellite interaction’
by Sandra Erwin — January 26, 2022 [SN]


In a visualization by the space tracking company ExoAnalytic, China’s Shijian-21 satellite is seen docking with Compass G2, a defunct Chinese satellite in geostationary Earth orbit. Credit: ExoAnalytic Solutions

Audrey Schaffer: 'We’re going to see more cooperative and potentially uncooperative close approaches between space objects'

WASHINGTON — The Biden administration in December released a broadly worded space policy document that recognizes growing military threats in space and calls for a rules-based international order.

With those issues in mind, the administration soon needs to start addressing more specific questions, Audrey Schaffer, director of space policy at the National Security Council, said Jan. 26.
https://spacenews.com/white-house-official-norms-needed-for-satellite-to-satellite-interaction/

Astroscale pauses debris-removal demo following anomaly
by Jason Rainbow — January 26, 2022 [SN]


Astroscale successfully released and then recaptured a small client satellite built by SSTL during an Aug. 25 test. Credit: Astroscale

TAMPA, Fla. — Astroscale said Jan. 26 it has paused an attempt to autonomously capture an in-orbit satellite for the first time after detecting “anomalous spacecraft conditions.”

The company’s 175-kilogram servicer spacecraft was preparing to make the attempt Jan. 25, after separating from a 17-kilogram client satellite acting as a piece of debris for a series of on-orbit demonstrations.
https://spacenews.com/astroscale-pauses-debris-removal-demo-following-anomaly/

Astroscale preparing to restart debris-removal demo
by Jason Rainbow — February 17, 2022 [SN]


Astroscale successfully released and then recaptured a small client satellite built by SSTL during an Aug. 25 test. Credit: Astroscale

TAMPA, Fla. — Astroscale said Feb. 17 it is preparing to resume an attempt to capture a satellite acting as a piece of debris in low Earth orbit, after pausing the demonstration three weeks ago to troubleshoot undisclosed problems.

The Japanese startup has started moving its 175-kilogram servicer spacecraft closer to the 17-kilogram client satellite ahead of deciding whether to restart the demonstration, Astroscale said in a social media post.
https://spacenews.com/astroscale-preparing-to-restart-debris-removal-demo/

Northrop Grumman to launch new satellite-servicing mission in 2024
by Sandra Erwin — February 21, 2022 [SN]

SpaceLogistics in 2024 will launch the Mission Robotic Vehicle, a servicing spacecraft equipped with a robotic arm that will install propulsion jet packs on dying satellites. Credit: Northrop Grumman

The first customer for the Mission Robotic Vehicle is Optus, Australia’s largest satellite operator

WASHINGTON — SpaceLogistics, a satellite-servicing firm owned by Northrop Grumman, announced Feb. 21 it plans to send to orbit a new servicing vehicle in 2024 on a SpaceX rocket.

This will be the debut of the company’s Mission Robotic Vehicle, a servicing spacecraft equipped with a robotic arm that will install propulsion jet packs on dying satellites. The first customer for the MRV is Optus, Australia’s largest satellite operator.
https://spacenews.com/northrop-grumman-to-launch-new-satellite-servicing-mission-in-2024/

Northrop Grumman says customers are ‘lined up’ for on-orbit satellite servicing
by Sandra Erwin — March 24, 2022 [SN]


Northrop Grumman’s electric propulsion system achieves “first light” at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The new system will power the SpaceLogistics Mission Extension Pod designed to add up to six years of service life to a client satellite. Credit: SpaceLogistics

SpaceLogistics designed the Mission Extension Pods to add up to six years of service life to satellites in geostationary orbit

WASHINGTON — SpaceLogistics, a satellite-servicing firm owned by Northrop Grumman, last week successfully fired the electric propulsion system it is developing for the Mission Extension Pods it plans to launch in 2024.

“It’s proceeding well. We achieved first light,” Rob Hauge, president of SpaceLogistics, told reporters March 24 at the Satellite 2022 conference.
https://spacenews.com/northrop-grumman-says-customers-are-lined-up-for-its-satellite-servicing-vehicle/

Lockheed Martin releases open-source satellite interface for on-orbit docking
by Sandra Erwin — April 4, 2022 [SN]


Artist rendering of Lockheed Martin's on-orbit docking station for servicing satellites. Credit: Lockheed Martin

The technical design data for the Mission Augmentation Port can be used by satellite manufacturers

COLORADO SPRINGS – Lockheed Martin on April 4 released the technical specifications of a docking adapter that could be used by manufacturers to make satellites interoperable and easier to update on orbit with new technology.

The technical data for the Mission Augmentation Port (MAP) can be used by designers to develop their own docking adapters, said Lockheed Martin.
https://spacenews.com/lockheed-martin-releases-open-source-satellite-interface-for-on-orbit-docking/

Op-ed | Assembling America’s Future in Space
by Andrew Rush — April 4, 2022 [SN]


Illustration of the On-Orbit Servicing, Manufacturing and Assembly-2 spacecraft. Credit: Redwire

The benefits of in-space servicing, assembly, and manufacturing (ISAM) have long been championed. From satellite refueling, to recycling of orbital debris, to increasing capability delivered on order through robotic manufacturing and assembly in space, ISAM will transform space architectures and provide strategic and commercial advantages to those who lead in its development and implementation. Combined with the U.S.’s success in dramatically reducing the cost of launch, ISAM has the potential to expand American civil, national security, and commercial leadership in space. Because of first-of-their-kind investments and accomplishments in the last decade, America is poised to realize the critical benefits of ISAM.
https://spacenews.com/op-ed-assembling-americas-future-in-space/

Astroscale to restart debris-removal demo with half the thrusters
by Jason Rainbow — April 7, 2022 [SN]


Astroscale successfully released and then recaptured a small client satellite built by SSTL during an Aug. 25 test. Credit: Astroscale

COLORADO SPRINGS — Astroscale plans to resume an attempt to capture a satellite acting as a piece of debris in low Earth orbit despite losing half the servicer’s eight thrusters.

Most of the other issues that forced Astroscale to pause its End-of-Life Services by Astroscale-demonstration (ELSA-d) mission Jan. 26 have been mitigated or resolved, the Tokyo-based startup said in an April 6 news release.
https://spacenews.com/astroscale-to-restart-debris-removal-demo-with-half-the-thrusters/

White House releases in-space servicing strategy
by Jeff Foust — April 13, 2022 [SN]


As commercial satellite servicing technologies, like Northrop Grumman's Mission Extension Vehicle, enter service, a new strategy seeks to coordinate activities by government agencies to support that nascent industry. Credit: Northrop Grumman

COLORADO SPRINGS — A new federal strategy seeks to coordinate activities among agencies and interaction with the private sector to advance work making and repairing spacecraft in space.
https://spacenews.com/white-house-releases-in-space-servicing-strategy/

Space Force looking at what it will take to refuel satellites in orbit
by Sandra Erwin — April 13, 2022 [SN]


Rendering of Orbit Fab’s refueling service architecture consists of propellant depots in various orbits, and shuttles that will deliver fuel from those depots to client spacecraft. Credit: Orbit Fab

A $50 million experiment called Tetra-5 will seek to demonstrate on-orbit refueling of small satellites in geostationary orbit

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Space Force in 2025 plans to launch to geostationary orbit three small satellites that will attempt to dock with a propellant tanker so they can be refueled in space.
https://spacenews.com/space-force-looking-at-what-it-will-take-to-refuel-satellites-in-orbit/

Space Force selects 125 industry proposals for on-orbit servicing technologies
by Sandra Erwin — May 2, 2022 [SN]


The Space Force created the Orbital Prime program to advance technologies for debris removal and on-orbit services. Credit: SpaceNews illustration

SpaceWERX deputy director Gabe Mounce: This project reflects a 'sense of urgency' about space sustainability

WASHINGTON — SpaceWERX, the technology arm of the U.S. Space Force, has selected 125 industry teams for the initial phase of the Orbital Prime program, an effort to develop technologies for orbital debris cleanup and other space services.
https://spacenews.com/space-force-selects-125-industry-proposals-for-on-orbit-servicing-technologies/

Astroscale debris-removal demo makes close approach despite thruster issues
by Jason Rainbow — May 4, 2022 [SN]


Astroscale successfully released and then recaptured a small client satellite built by SSTL during an Aug. 25 test. Credit: Astroscale

TAMPA, Fla. — Astroscale said May 4 it made another close-approach rendezvous between its two ELSA-d spacecraft last month but ongoing thruster problems continue to hold up a capture demonstration delayed from January.

Astroscale’s ELSA-d servicer spacecraft, a 175-kilogram satellite designed to demonstrate orbital debris removal technologies, lost the use of four of its eight 1-newton thrusters in January.
https://spacenews.com/astroscale-debris-removal-demo-makes-close-approach-despite-thruster-issues/

Momentus receives approvals for first tug launch
by Jeff Foust — May 9, 2022 [SN]


Momentus announced May 5 it received its final regulatory approval, an FAA payload review, for the launch of its first Vigoride tug later this month. Credit: Momentus

WASHINGTON — In-space transportation company Momentus has secured all the regulatory approvals for its first mission, set to launch later this month.

The company announced May 5 it passed a payload review by the Federal Aviation Administration required for the commercial launch of its orbital transfer vehicle on SpaceX’s Transporter-5 mission, scheduled for launch in late May from Cape Canaveral, Florida. The company earlier obtained a Federal Communications Commission communications license and a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration remote sensing license for cameras on the tug.
https://spacenews.com/momentus-receives-approvals-for-first-tug-launch/

Launcher announces customers for first Orbiter space tug mission
by Jeff Foust — May 16, 2022 [SN]


Launcher said its first Orbiter space tug mission, launching in October, will deploy smallsats for six customers and host payloads for four others. Credit: Launcher

WASHINGTON — Launch vehicle and in-space transportation services company Launcher has filled the manifest for the first flight of its space tug later this year with a mix of commercial and academic payloads.

Launcher announced May 16 that the first flight of its Orbiter vehicle, which will be on SpaceX’s Transporter-6 rideshare mission in October, will deploy satellites for six customers and carry hosted payloads for four others.
https://spacenews.com/launcher-announces-customers-for-first-orbiter-space-tug-mission/

Astroscale gets funds for 2024 debris-removal mission
by Jason Rainbow — May 27, 2022 [SN]


OneWeb's satellites are built in Florida under a joint venture with Airbus, called OneWeb Satellites. Credit: OneWeb

TAMPA, Fla. — Astroscale has secured European Space Agency funding for a 2024 demo mission to remove what will likely be a OneWeb satellite.

The debris-removal startup said May 27 that the 15 million euro ($16 million) funding enables it to complete the design of its ELSA-m servicer spacecraft, progressing through manufacturing up to the satellite pre-integration phase.
https://spacenews.com/astroscale-gets-funds-for-2024-debris-removal-mission/

Telespazio to play key role in satellite servicing market
by Debra Werner — June 24, 2022 [SN]


Telespazio’s “Piero Fanti” Space Centre in Fucino, Italy, which has been active since 1963. Credit: Telespazio

SAN FRANCISCO – Telespazio intends to play a key role in the future in-orbit servicing market, providing customers seeking satellite relocation, refueling, repair or removal with the necessary space and ground-based capabilities.

“There is an industrial role that Telespazio can definitely play on the basis of 61 years of experience in providing operational service,” Marco Brancati, Telespazio head of innovation and technical governance, told SpaceNews. “On the other side, Telespazio can be a kind of broker, combining the needs of the owners of in-orbit assets with the availability of tugs able to provide specific services.”
https://spacenews.com/telespazio-in-orbit-servicing/

Northrop Grumman gets $22 million Space Force contract to build small-satellite carrier bus
by Sandra Erwin — July 9, 2022 [SN]


The Northrop Grumman-built Long Duration Propulsion ESPA-1 (LDPE-1) launched in December 2021 on the Space Test Program 3 (STP-3) mission. Credit: U.S. Space Force

The contract is a sole-source award for a satellite called ROOSTER, short for Rapid On-orbit Space Technology Evaluation Ring

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Space Force awarded Northrop Grumman a $22 million contract to produce a satellite bus able to carry multiple small payloads that will be used to demonstrate on-orbit refueling in geostationary orbit.

The contract, announced July 8, was a sole-source award for a satellite called ROOSTER, short for Rapid On-orbit Space Technology Evaluation Ring. It is based on the Northrop Grumman ESPAStar payload adapter, a ring-shaped bus designed to ride as a secondary payload on national security space missions launched by United Launch Alliance and SpaceX.
https://spacenews.com/northrop-grumman-gets-22-million-space-force-contract-to-build-small-satellite-carrier-bus/
« Ostatnia zmiana: Lipiec 26, 2022, 06:53 wysłana przez Orionid »

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 21638
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Artykuły o Satellite operations
« Odpowiedź #1 dnia: Lipiec 26, 2022, 06:53 »
DoD signaling demand for satellite support services in geostationary orbit
by Sandra Erwin — July 25, 2022 [SN]


Motiv Space Systems and subcontractor Blue Origin won a contract from the Defense Innovation Unit to develop a robotic module that can be installed on servicing vehicles operating in geostationary orbit. Credit: Motiv Space Systems

Defense Innovation Unit's Steve Butow: 'We want to make GEO cool again'

WASHINGTON — The Defense Innovation Unit is funding space projects that the agency hopes will spur commercial investments in satellite refueling technologies and support services for geostationary satellites.

“Imagine a world where every 18 to 24 months, you could simply upgrade the processor on a satellite in GEO the way that you upgrade your smartphone to take advantage of new processing power and new functionality,” said Steve “Bucky” Butow, director of the space portfolio at the Defense Innovation Unit.
https://spacenews.com/dod-signaling-demand-for-satellite-support-services-in-geostationary-orbit/

Polskie Forum Astronautyczne

Odp: Artykuły o Satellite operations
« Odpowiedź #1 dnia: Lipiec 26, 2022, 06:53 »