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Artykuły o Extravehicular activities (EVA)
« dnia: Styczeń 29, 2021, 01:48 »
Balky connectors prevent full activation of European experiment platform
January 27, 2021 William Harwood


Astronaut Mike Hopkins works outside the International Space Station during a spacewalk Wednesday. Credit: NASA TV/Spaceflight Now

Two astronauts working outside the International Space Station Wednesday installed a European Space Agency data relay antenna and connected four of six cables to partially power a new ESA experiment platform. They also removed two solar array handling fixtures to clear the way for a future power system upgrade.

But the two cables they were unable to connect to the Bartolomeo platform, attached to the front side of ESA’s Columbus laboratory module, will need to be connected later to accommodate a full suite of external payloads.

“At least we got partially connected to Bartolomeo,” European astronaut Andreas Mogensen radioed the crew from mission control in Houston.

Floating in the Quest airlock, astronauts Mike Hopkins and Victor Glover switched their suits to battery power at 6:28 a.m. EST to officially kick off 233rd spacewalk in station history and the first so far this year. It was the third spacewalk for Hopkins and the first for Glover.

After floating out of the airlock, Glover attached a foot restraint to the end of the space station’s robot arm and rode the space crane to the European Space Agency’s Columbus module where he and Hopkins installed a high-speed Ka-band data relay antenna.

Flight controllers initially had problems activating a heater in the antenna, but after Hopkins unplugged and re-connected a power cable, the system began working normally.



The Bartolomeo platform is transferred from the Dragon cargo ship to the International Space Station last year. Credit: NASA

The spacewalkers then worked to route cables and to connect the Bartolomeo experiment platform to the Columbus module, providing power and data relay to experiment and instrument attachment points

Bartolomeo was delivered to the station last spring aboard a SpaceX cargo ship and attached to Columbus using the robot arm. The platform will be used to mount a variety of external experiment packages that can be changed out as needed for research.

“We have been preparing for the better part of a year as we awaited the arrival of the Bartolomeo platform,” said flight director Rick Henfling. “It arrived on the SpaceX CRS-20 (cargo) mission last April. It was installed robotically, and now we have a few more tasks, using our spacewalkers to hook up the power and data connections.”

But Hopkins and Glover were only able to get four of six cables properly connected. While Hopkins worked to resolve the problem, Glover, still riding on the end of the robot arm, carried a protective cover that had been attached to the new antenna to a point well away from the main body of the station.

Once in position, seeming to float alone in orbital darkness, Glover pushed the boxy antenna cover away on a trajectory that ensured it would not make its way back to the station’s vicinity before re-entering the atmosphere and burning up.

Unable to resolve the cable trouble, Hopkins capped the two balky connectors and used tie-downs to hold all the cables in place.

Both spacewalkers then made their way to the far left end of the station’s power truss and removed two solar array ground handling fixtures. The so-called “H fixtures” are being taken off to make way for new solar panels that will be attached to the existing arrays later to boost the lab’s power output.

Today’s spacewalk came to an end at 1:24 p.m. after six hours and 56 minutes.

Hopkins and Glover plan to carry out a second spacewalk next week to remove additional H fixtures, to complete work to install a replacement solar array battery and to replace cameras on the power truss, the Destiny lab module and on a Japanese robot arm.

“We’ve been talking about this particular set of EVAs for the better part of a year,” said Kenny Todd, space station integration manager at the Johnson Space Center. “So I’m certainly ready to be done talking about them and actually go see them executed.”


Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/01/27/eva-69/
« Ostatnia zmiana: Czerwiec 04, 2021, 03:29 wysłana przez Orionid »

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Odp: [SFN] Spacewalkers upgrade station cameras, complete battery work
« Odpowiedź #1 dnia: Luty 05, 2021, 01:49 »
Spacewalkers upgrade station cameras, complete battery work
February 1, 2021 William Harwood [SFN]


Victor Glover works outside the International Space Station on Feb. 1, 2021. Image: NASA TV/Spaceflight Now.

Astronauts Mike Hopkins and Victor Glover floated back outside the International Space Station Monday and completed solar array battery replacement work that began four years ago. They also installed three new video cameras and made preparations for upcoming work to install new roll-out solar blankets to upgrade the lab’s power system.

The work took less time than expected and the astronauts were able to carry out a variety of lower-priority “get-ahead” tasks before returning to Quest airlock and calling it a day, closing out a five-hour 20-minute spacewalk.

Taking one last look around before entering the airlock, Hopkins said simply “beautiful view.”

The excursion began at 7:56 a.m. EST when the two men switched their spacesuits to battery power, officially kicking off the 234th spacewalk, or EVA, devoted to station assembly and maintenance since construction began 23 years ago in 1998.

“OK, it’s a beautiful day. Let’s go for a walk outside,” astronaut Bob Hines radioed from mission control in Houston.

The first priority was electrically connecting a replacement battery in the station’s solar power system.

The batteries are critical to station operation. They are recharged by the arrays when the lab is in sunlight and then provide that stored power during periods of orbital darkness.

Starting in 2017, spacewalking astronauts began work to replace all 48 of the station’s original nickel-hydrogen batteries with 24 smaller, more powerful lithium ion units.

During battery replacement work in March 2019, one of the new lithium ion power packs used by the station’s left-side inboard set of arrays failed and was replaced with one of the older nickel hydrogen batteries that had been removed. All of the other older batteries were replaced as planned during multiple spacewalks.

Over the weekend, flight controllers operating the station’s robot arm by remote control disconnected the one remaining nickel hydrogen battery and robotically installed a fresh lithium ion unit. Hopkins and Glover electrically connected the replacement, finally completing the power system upgrade four years after the work began.

Before leaving the battery worksite, Hopkins and Glover removed a no-longer-needed solar array ground handling fixture to make way for the eventual attachment of new solar blankets to boost the lab’s power.

The remainder of the spacewalk was primarily devoted to upgrading the station’s external camera system.

With Glover now riding on the end of the station’s robot arm, the astronauts first removed and replaced a camera group mounted on a stand attached to the right side inboard solar array truss segment.

Glover then rode the arm to the Destiny laboratory module to attach a high definition camera to an existing set while Hopkins, meanwhile, headed out to the Kibo laboratory module to install a new wrist camera on the lab’s small Japanese robot arm.

The astronauts completed their planned work well ahead of schedule, allowing time for a few get-ahead tasks before returning to the airlock and repressurizing at 1:15 p.m. Total spacewalk time across 234 EVAs since station assembly began now stands at 1,471 hours and seven minutes, or 61.3 days.

Two more spacewalks are planned over the next few weeks by the current Expedition 64 crew.

Glover and veteran spacewalker Kate Rubins will work outside the lab to make more preparations for attachment of new solar blankets. Two sets of “ISS roll out solar array” blankets will be carried up later this year aboard SpaceX Dragon cargo ships.

Rubins and Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi, also a veteran spacewalker, will carry out a variety of station upgrades during the current crew’s final spacewalk.


Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/02/01/spacewalk-underway-to-upgrade-station-cameras-complete-battery-work/

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Odp: [SFN] Astronauts complete spacewalk to prep for station power system
« Odpowiedź #2 dnia: Marzec 01, 2021, 00:36 »
Astronauts complete spacewalk to prep for station power system upgrades
February 28, 2021 William Harwood [SFN]
EDITOR’S NOTE: Updated at 2 p.m. EST (1900 GMT) after end of spacewalk.



Two astronauts floated outside the International Space Station Sunday for the first in a series of spacewalks to upgrade the lab’s aging solar power system, assembling a support fixture that eventually will hold a new solar blanket.

The spacewalkers lost time struggling to get a bolt properly tightened and were unable to get as far along as they’d planned with a second fixture. That work will resume next Friday in an already planned spacewalk primarily devoted to station maintenance.

Floating in the Quest airlock, Kate Rubins and Victor Glover switched their spacesuits to battery power at 6:12 a.m. EST to officially kick off the 235th station spacewalk since assembly began in 1998, the third so far this year and the third overall for both astronauts.

Both astronauts were equipped with helmet cameras, but Rubins made the first use of a high-definition “helmetcam” that provided razor-sharp views, allowing flight controllers to follow along as never before.

The goal of the excursion was to install struts at the far left end of the station’s power truss to support new roll-out solar array blankets scheduled for delivery later this year and next. Additional spacewalks will be needed to installed additional support fixtures and, eventually, new solar array blankets.

The space station is equipped with four huge solar array wings, two on each side of the lab’s power truss. Each wing is made up of two 39-foot-wide blankets extending 112 feet in opposite directions. The first two-blanket wing was launched in December 2000 with additional pairs delivered in 2006, 2007 and 2009.


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Spaceflight Now@SpaceflightNow 2:11 PM · Feb 28, 2021

Astronauts Kate Rubins and Victor Glover are working outside the International Space Station today.

They are installing the first support fixture to support new solar arrays arriving later this year to upgrade the station’s electrical system.

Watch live: https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/02/28/iss-eva-71/
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The arrays feed power into eight electrical circuits, two per wing. When the station is in daylight, the arrays charge batteries and deliver power to the lab’s myriad systems. During night passes, the batteries feed stored power to the station.

Solar cells degrade over time and NASA is adding six new blankets, at a cost of $103 million, to the existing power system. Each one of the new ISS roll-out solar arrays, or IROSA, blankets measure 20 feet wide by 63 feet long when fully extended, generating more than 20 kilowatts.

Combined with the 95 kilowatt output of the original eight panels, the station’s upgraded system will provide about 215,000 kilowatts of power.

“Commercial users are coming on board that are looking for power that that we didn’t even dream of back in the mid 90s,” said Kenny Todd, deputy manager of the station program at the Johnson Space Center.

“The technology really has gotten to the point that we can do something like these roll out solar arrays. They’re not as big as the ones that we previous deployed, and yet we can we can get even more power out of them.”



Six of the space station’s eight large solar arrays will be augmented with new solar panels. Credit: NASA TV/Spaceflight Now

Rubins and Glover spent the day Sunday working at the base of the far left, or port six, set of solar arrays, which provide power to electrical channels 2B and 4B.

Exiting the airlock, the astronauts carried out two eight-foot-long bags containing the struts needed for assembly of triangular support fixtures at the bases of the two P6 arrays.

The first fixture, on the P6/2B solar array mast canister, went together relatively smoothly but the astronauts had problems completely tightening a bolt holding a strut to the structure. While the fixture was securely attached to the mast canister, a bit of play remained.

Rubins backed out one bolt and attempted to re-install it, but it again stalled before firmly locking the components flush together. Rubins and Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi plan another spacewalk next Friday and they may make another attempt to tighten the stuck bolt.

In the meantime. Glover pressed ahead with assembly of a triangular section of the support fixture needed for the P6/4A set of arrays. It was tied down on the station’s power truss to await assembly during the next spacewalk.

Rubins and Glover then returned to the Quest airlock, ending a seven-hour four-minute spacewalk at 1:16 p.m. Total station spacewalk time now stands at 1,478 hours and four minutes, or 61.6 days. Rubins’ total through three spacewalks stands at 19 hours and 50 minutes while Glover has logged 19 hours and 20 minutes through his three excursions.

Additional spacewalks will be needed later to install the four additional solar blanket supports and the blankets themselves. The new arrays will be delivered aboard three SpaceX Dragon cargo ships starting later this year. Two spacewalks will be required to install each new blanket.


Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/02/28/iss-eva-71/

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Odp: [SFN] Rubins and Noguchi assemble solar array support fixtures
« Odpowiedź #3 dnia: Marzec 11, 2021, 00:41 »
Rubins and Noguchi assemble solar array support fixtures outside space station
March 5, 2021 William Harwood [SFN]
EDITOR’S NOTE: Updated at 2:30 p.m. EDT (1930 GMT) after end of spacewalk.
STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS & USED WITH PERMISSION


Astronaut Soichi Noguchi works outside the International Space Station on Friday. Credit: NASA TV/Spaceflight Now

NASA astronaut Kate Rubins and Soichi Noguchi, a Japanese astronaut who last walked in space more than 15 years ago, ventured outside the International Space Station Friday and completed assembly of two solar array support fixtures, part of a $100 million power system upgrade.

After handling multiple struts and bolts, Rubins reported a small pin-prick “hole” in one of her gloves and while there was no leakage and no emergency, she expressed concern about moving too far from Noguchi for additional work.

“There’s a hole in my right index finger through the RTV (insulation),” she told astronaut Frank Rubio in mission control. “It’s unchanged in appearance. And we have a middle finger peeling, my right middle finger, and … gaps in the RTV on my left middle finger.”

With installation of the solar array support fixtures complete, Rubio asked how she felt about leaving Noguchi, moving back to the space station airlock to drop off tools and then heading out to the European Columbus laboratory module to complete electrical connections for a recently installed experiment platform.

“This is kind of a pinprick hole versus RTV peeling,” Rubins replied. “So I’m mildly concerned about going real far from Soichi.”

Rubins’ suit maintained the proper pressure throughout, but given time lost earlier assembling the solar array supports, flight controllers opted to call it a day without pressing ahead with work to finish wiring up the experiment platform.

“I think that’s a good plan,” Rubins said. “Thanks, Frank.”


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Spaceflight Now @SpaceflightNow
Astronaut Kate Rubins reports a “pinpoint” hole in the glove of her spacesuit, but there's no leak as she and Soichi Noguchi wrap up a spacewalk at the International Space Station.

Rubins said she is “mildly concerned” about getting too far from Noguchi.
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The work began at 6:37 a.m. EST when the astronauts switched their suits to battery power, officially kicking off the year’s fourth spacewalk, the 236th since station assembly began in 1998.

“What a view!” Noguchi said as he floated out of the airlock some 260 miles above the Atlantic Ocean.

It was the fourth spacewalk for Rubins, including one last Sunday with crewmate Victor Glover to begin the assembly of the solar array fixtures. It also was the fourth spacewalk for Noguchi, whose last excursion came in 2005 during the first post-Columbia shuttle mission.

Last Sunday, Rubins and Glover installed the first of two new solar array support fixtures at the base of the lab’s far left set of solar wings. The fixtures are designed to support new roll-out solar blankets that will be installed later to boost the station’s power generation.

But the astronauts had problems fully seating two bolts connecting struts in the Tinker Toy-like fixture. Rubins and Noguchi first finished assembly of the second solar array support and used a torque wrench to tighten up the bolts in the first assembly.

“Amazing! I’m so happy to see that black line,” Rubins said, referring to an indicator showing the second bolt was fully seated.

“It’s amazing what a little torque can do,” Rubio replied.

The flight plan then called for Rubins to venture to the front of the European Space Agency’s Columbus laboratory module where the external experiment platform — Bartolomeo — is attached. While she worked to complete electrical connections, Noguchi planned to install a replacement wireless video transceiver attached to the central Unity module.

But given the time lost with the solar array assembly work, those tasks were deferred to a future spacewalk. Rubins and Noguchi returned to the airlock and repressurization began at 1:33 p.m., bringing the 6-hour 56-minute excursion to a close.

NASA plans to install six new ISS roll-out solar arrays, or IROSA, blankets that are scheduled for delivery later this year and next aboard SpaceX Dragon cargo ships. Additional spacewalks will be needed to install additional support fixtures and, eventually, the new roll-out blankets.

The space station is equipped with four primary solar array wings, two on each side of the lab’s power truss. Each wing is made up of two 39-foot-wide blankets extending 112 feet in opposite directions. The first two-blanket wing was launched in December 2000 with additional pairs delivered in 2006, 2007 and 2009.

Solar cells degrade over time and NASA is adding six new blankets, at a cost of $103 million, to the existing power system. Each one of the new IROSA blankets measure 20 feet wide by 63 feet long when fully extended, generating more than 20 kilowatts.

The two support fixtures, or “mod kits,” assembled last Sunday and Friday will carry two of the new arrays at the far left end of the station’s power truss, tilting them at an angle so the new panels and the original arrays get sunlight.

Combined with the 95 kilowatt output of the original eight panels, the station’s upgraded system will provide about 215 kilowatts of power, enough for NASA-sponsored research and anticipated commercial activity between now and the end of the decade.


Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/03/05/us-eva-72/

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Odp: [SFN] Rubins and Noguchi assemble solar array support fixtures
« Odpowiedź #3 dnia: Marzec 11, 2021, 00:41 »

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Odp: [SFN] Spacewalkers vent coolant lines and mate cables
« Odpowiedź #4 dnia: Marzec 14, 2021, 02:35 »
Spacewalkers vent coolant lines and mate cables outside space station
March 13, 2021 William Harwood [SFN]
STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS & USED WITH PERMISSION


Astronaut Soichi Noguchi shared this photo of astronaut Victor Glover on a spacewalk Saturday, with this caption: “FLY NAVY! IKE @AstroVicGlover soars over US LAB module.” Credit: Soichi Noguchi/JAXA/NASA

Struggling with balky electrical connectors, spacewalker Mike Hopkins managed to plug in and secure three of four thick power and data cables Saturday that are needed by a European experiment platform, leaving one cable for additional troubleshooting.

Hopkins and crewmate Victor Glover also vented residual ammonia coolant from two jumpers used to service the station’s thermal control system, stowing the hoses in different locations for future use if needed.

One jumper spewed more ammonia ice crystals than expected when it was vented to space, but the astronauts said their suits did not appear to be contaminated with any flakes that could be brought back into the station.

Glover replaced a wireless camera transceiver and attached a stiffener to a flexible thermal cover on the Quest airlock’s outer hatch. He complained of an unusual irritation that briefly caused his right eye to tear up, but said repeated blinking seemed to help.

Hopkins also reconfigured a HAM radio antenna on the European Columbus module that failed to work correctly after a recent upgrade and both spacewalkers began work to route two ethernet cables that eventually will be part of an expanded external wi-fi network.

All of the major tasks originally were planned for spacewalks earlier this month but they were deferred after the assembly of two solar array support fixtures took longer than expected.

Floating in the Quest airlock, Hopkins and Glover began Saturday’s excursion when they switched their spacesuits to battery power at 8:14 a.m. EST, kicking off the 237th spacewalk, or EVA, devoted to station assembly and maintenance since construction began in 1998.

The first task on the agenda was to safely vent the two ammonia jumpers, used for loading coolant in the station’s thermal control system and for helping track down leaks. The jumpers were located on the far left end of the lab’s solar power truss, a segment known as port 6, or P6.

After confirming no contamination with ammonia ice crystals, the spacewalkers stowed one jumper on the P6 segment for any future troubleshooting that might be needed on that side of the station while the other was mounted outside the airlock for use if needed later on the right side.


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Spaceflight Now @SpaceflightNow 3:51 PM · Mar 13, 2021
Astronauts Victor Glover and Mike Hopkins have vented two ammonia coolant jumpers on the International Space Station’s solar power truss, completing the first tasks of today’s spacewalk.

Venting ammonia is visible on the right in this video.
Twitter

“Of course, when dealing with ammonia, extra vigilance is necessary because of the concern that if we got ammonia contamination on the suits, and then brought that inside station, that could represent a potential toxic atmosphere situation for the crew and station,” spacewalk flight director Chris Edelen said earlier.

With the jumper venting and relocation complete, Glover installed a replacement wireless camera transceiver near the central Unity module while Hopkins worked at the forward end of the station where the European Space Agency’s Columbus laboratory module is attached.

An external experiment platform known as Bartolomeo was attached to the forward side of Columbus earlier, but spacewalkers had problems completing electrical connections during an earlier outing. Hopkins struggled to complete the job Saturday, but eventually succeeded with three of four cables.

“Mated! It’s over center,” Hopkins called when the first balky connector was plugged in and locked in place. “Nice! And the crowd goes wild!”

“Good job, wow, excellent,” Andreas Mogensen replied from mission control. “Good news.”

“I’d say touchdown, but he played on the wrong side of the ball,” Glover quipped, referring to Hopkins’ college football career as a University of Illinois defensive back.

“We did interceptions once in a while,” Hopkins said.

The wireless video system external transceiver assembly, or WETA, that Glover installed is one of three mounted around the station’s exterior. The unit in question failed late last year.

“This is essentially an antenna that receives the transmissions from the crew members’ helmetcams,” Edelen said. “We … really appreciate having this in mission control during EVAs to be able to have the crew members’ perspective to see exactly what they’re working on. So we definitely want to … get this replaced so that we have good coverage.”

The spacewalk came to an end at 3:01 p.m. for a duration of six hours and 47 minutes. Total station spacewalk time through 237 excursions now stands at 1,491 hours and 54 minutes, or 62.2 days.


Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/03/13/us-eva-73/

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Odp: Artykuły o Extravehicular activities (EVA)
« Odpowiedź #5 dnia: Czerwiec 04, 2021, 03:32 »
Spacewalkers prepare space station’s Russian Pirs module for disposal
June 2, 2021 William Harwood [SFN]


Russian cosmonaut Pyotr Dubrov wears an Oral spacesuit during a spacewalk Wednesday outside the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Two cosmonauts floated outside the International Space Station early Wednesday to wrap up preparations for detaching the two-decades-old Pirs airlock and docking compartment next month, clearing the way for the long-planned arrival of a new laboratory module.

Oleg Novitskiy and Pyotr Dubrov, opened the hatch of the Poisk module at 1:53 a.m. EDT to officially kick off the 238th spacewalk devoted to station assembly and maintenance, the sixth excursion so far this year and the first for both cosmonauts.

Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/06/02/spacewalkers-prepare-space-stations-russian-pirs-docking-compartment-for-disposal/

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Odp: Artykuły o Extravehicular activities (EVA)
« Odpowiedź #6 dnia: Czerwiec 16, 2021, 23:36 »
Spacewalkers run out of time before unrolling new space station solar array
June 16, 2021 William Harwood STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS & USED WITH PERMISSION [SFN]


European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet works with the iROSA solar arrays during Wednesday’s spacewalk. Credit: NASA TV/Spaceflight Now

Two astronauts floated outside the International Space Station Wednesday and attached a rolled-up solar array, the first of six intended to boost the lab’s power back to factory fresh levels. But a spacesuit glitch and then an interference issue with the array mechanism prevented them from extending the new panel as planned.

European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet and NASA crewmate Shane Kimbrough already planned another spacewalk Sunday to install a second roll-out solar array, but it’s not yet known how the unfinished work Wednesday might play into that timeline.

Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/06/16/us-eva-74/

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Odp: Artykuły o Extravehicular activities (EVA)
« Odpowiedź #7 dnia: Czerwiec 21, 2021, 04:24 »
Spacewalkers unfurl first of six new space station solar arrays
June 20, 2021 Stephen Clark [SFN]


Astronauts Thomas Pesquet and Shane Kimbrough, at left, work with the ISS Roll-Out Solar Array during a spacewalk Sunday. Credit: Oleg Novitskiy/Roscosmos

Astronauts Thomas Pesquet and Shane Kimbrough floated outside the International Space Station Sunday to deploy and unroll a new solar array blanket after encountering spacesuit glitches and an interference issue during a previous excursion Wednesday.

Pesquet and Kimbrough switched their spacesuits to battery power at 7:42 a.m. EDT (1142 GMT) Sunday to begin a planned six-and-a-half hour spacewalk.

Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/06/20/us-eva-75/

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Odp: Artykuły o Extravehicular activities (EVA)
« Odpowiedź #8 dnia: Czerwiec 26, 2021, 01:49 »
Spacewalking astronauts install second upgraded solar array
June 25, 2021 William Harwood [SFN]


Thomas Pesquet moves the new solar array to the P6 truss for installation. Image: NASA TV/Spaceflight Now.

French astronaut Thomas Pesquet and NASA crewmate Shane Kimbrough floated back outside the International Space Station Friday and deployed a 60-foot-long roll-out solar array, the second of six new blankets being installed to upgrade the lab’s power system and offset age-related degradation.

“It looks like the deployment is complete,” Pesquet radioed, watching the array unroll itself six hours after the spacewalk began. “The motion has stopped.”

After adjusting the tension on the new array, the astronauts collected their tools and made their way back to the space station’s Quest airlock, wrapping up a six-hour 45-minute excursion.

Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/06/25/spacewalking-astronauts-install-second-upgraded-solar-array/

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Odp: Artykuły o Extravehicular activities (EVA)
« Odpowiedź #9 dnia: Wrzesień 04, 2021, 18:20 »
Russian spacewalkers begin outfitting new lab module
September 3, 2021 Stephen Clark [SFN]


Cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy works outside the International Space Station to electrically connect a new Russian laboratory module to the outpost. This shot was captured by a helmet camera used by crewmate Pyotr Dubrov. Credit: NASA TV

Two Russian spacewalkers connected a new laboratory module to the International Space Station’s power grid Friday, routing and plugging in eight cables to tap into electricity generated by NASA’s solar power system.

Oleg Novitskiy and Pyotr Dubrov ran about an hour behind schedule getting two bundles of cables hooked up between the newly-arrived Nauka lab module and the U.S. segment of the station, prompting Russian flight controllers to defer a few lower-priority tasks.

Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/09/03/russian-spacewalkers-begin-outfitting-new-lab-module/

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Odp: Artykuły o Extravehicular activities (EVA)
« Odpowiedź #10 dnia: Wrzesień 14, 2021, 00:29 »
Russian cosmonauts conduct spacewalk despite smoke, alarm on space station
By Ashley Strickland, CNN Updated 2224 GMT (0624 HKT) September 9, 2021 [CNN]

(CNN) Russian cosmonauts Oleg Novitskiy and Pyotr Dubrov conducted their second spacewalk in less than a week as they continue configurations for the new Nauka module for operations on the International Space Station.

The spacewalk began Thursday at 10:51 a.m. and ended at 6:16 p.m. ET, lasting for seven hours and 25 minutes.

Source: https://edition.cnn.com/2021/09/09/world/russian-spacewalk-nauka-september-scn/index.html

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Odp: Artykuły o Extravehicular activities (EVA)
« Odpowiedź #11 dnia: Wrzesień 14, 2021, 00:29 »
Spacewalking astronauts continue solar array upgrade work
September 12, 2021 William Harwood,  EDITOR’S NOTE: Updated after end of EVA. [SFN]
STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS & USED WITH PERMISSION


Japanese astronaut Akihiko Hoshide works with a spacesuit inside the International Space Station in August. Credit: NASA

Three days after a Russian spacewalk, Japanese space station commander Akihiko Hoshide and Frenchman Thomas Pesquet floated outside for their own excursion Sunday, building a support fixture for a roll-out solar array blanket that will be attached later.

Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/09/12/iss-us-eva-77/

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Odp: Artykuły o Extravehicular activities (EVA)
« Odpowiedź #11 dnia: Wrzesień 14, 2021, 00:29 »