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Sunita Williams 19.09.1965
« dnia: Wrzesień 20, 2020, 04:31 »
Sunita Lyn 'Suni' Williams obchodziła wczoraj 55. urodziny.
Następne urodziny astronautka astronautka będzie jeszcze obchodzić na Ziemi. Kolejne już powinna po powrocie z ISS.
W ten sposób stanie się drugą kobietą biorącą po raz trzeci udział w długotrwałym locie kosmicznym.









Bio na stronie NASA https://www.nasa.gov/astronauts/biographies/sunita-l-williams/biography/

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Odp: Sunita Williams 19.09.1965
« Odpowiedź #1 dnia: Wrzesień 20, 2020, 04:39 »

S116-E-06429 (15 Dec. 2006) --- The STS-116 crewmembers gather for a group portrait during a joint crew press conference in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station while Space Shuttle Discovery was docked with the station. From the left (front row) are astronauts William A. (Bill) Oefelein, pilot; Joan E. Higginbotham, Nicholas J. M. Patrick and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Reiter, mission specialists. From the left (back row) are astronauts Mark L. Polansky, commander; Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 14 flight engineer; European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Christer Fuglesang and Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., mission specialists. Shortly after the two spacecraft docked on Dec. 11, Williams became a member of the station crew. At the same time, Reiter became a Discovery crewmember for his ride home, completing about six months in space.


1) STS116-S-016 (9 Dec. 2006) --- Against a black night sky, the Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station. Liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39B occurred at 8:47 p.m. (EST) on Dec. 9, 2006 in what was the first evening shuttle launch since 2002. The STS-116 crew will link up with the station on Monday, Dec. 11, to begin a complex, week-long stay that will rewire the outpost and increase its power supply. During three spacewalks and intricate choreography with ground controllers, the astronauts will bring electrical power on line generated by a giant solar array wing delivered to the station in September.
2) STS117-S-047 (22 June 2007) --- Space Shuttle Atlantis' main landing gear touches down on runway 22 at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California concluding a successful assembly mission to the International Space Station. Atlantis landed on orbit 219 after 13 days, 20 hours and 12 minutes in space. The landing was diverted to California due to marginal weather at the Kennedy Space Center. Main gear touchdown was at 12:49:38 p.m. (PDT). Nose gear touchdown was at 12:49:49 p.m. and wheel stop was at 12:50:48 p.m. This was the 51st landing for the Space Shuttle Program at Edwards Air Force Base. The mission to the station was a success, installing and activating the S3/S4 truss and retracting the P6 arrays. Onboard were astronauts Rick Sturckow, commander; Lee Archambault, pilot; Jim Reilly, Steven Swanson, Patrick Forrester and John "Danny" Olivas, all STS-117 mission specialists. Also onboard was astronaut Sunita Williams, who was flight engineer on the Expedition 15 crew. She achieved a new milestone, a record-setting flight at 194 days, 18 hours and 58 minutes, the longest single spaceflight ever by a female astronaut or cosmonaut.


1) S116-E-05289 (10 Dec. 2006) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams (right) and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Christer Fuglesang, both STS-116 mission specialists, enjoy a light moment as they prepare to open food packages on the middeck of Space Shuttle Discovery. Williams will join the Expedition 14 crew as flight engineer after she enters the International Space Station. Docking of the two spacecraft will occur on Dec. 11.
2) S116-E-05860 (12 Dec. 2006) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 14 flight engineer, smiles for the camera as she floats in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station during flight day four activities.


S116-E-05329 (10 Dec. 2006) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams, STS-116 mission specialist, uses a computer on the middeck of Space Shuttle Discovery during flight day two activities.


JSC2006-E-54703 (20 Dec. 2006) --- Space Shuttle Discovery photographed by the Micro-Electromechanical System-Based (MEMS) PICOSAT Inspector (MEPSI) mini-satellite, shortly after its release from Discovery's payload bay. The coffee cup-sized low-power inspection satellite will demonstrate the use of tiny, low-power satellites to observe larger spacecraft. It will test the function of small camera systems and gyroscopes. Photo credit: DOD Space Test Program.
https://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-116/ndxpage29.html


1) ISS014-E-09635 (12 Dec. 2006) --- Astronauts Joan E. Higginbotham (foreground), STS-116 mission specialist, and Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 14 flight engineer, refer to a procedures checklist as they work the controls of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) or Canadarm2 in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station during flight day four activities.
2) ISS014-E-13980 (19 Feb. 2007) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 14 flight engineer, works the controls of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) or Canadarm2 in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.
https://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/station/crew-14/inflight/ndxpage29.html


ISS014-E-19535 (17 April 2007) --- The crewmembers onboard the International Space Station pose for a group portrait during the ceremony of Changing-of-Command from Expedition 14 to Expedition 15 in the Destiny laboratory. From the left are cosmonauts Mikhail Tyurin, Expedition 14 flight engineer; Fyodor N. Yurchikhin, Expedition 15 commander; astronaut Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, Expedition 14 commander and NASA space station science officer; cosmonaut Oleg V. Kotov, Expedition 15 flight engineer; and astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 14/15 flight engineer. Tyurin, Yurchikhin and Kotov represent Russia's Federal Space Agency.
https://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/station/crew-15/inflight/ndxpage10.html

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1) ISS032-E-016876 (8 Aug. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, Expedition 32 flight engineer, performs a VO2max experiment while using the Cycle Ergometer with Vibration Isolation System (CEVIS) in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. VO2max uses the Portable Pulmonary Function System (PPFS), CEVIS, Pulmonary Function System (PFS) gas cylinders and mixing bag system, plus multiple other pieces of hardware to measure oxygen uptake and cardiac output.
2) ISS032-E-022942 (22 Aug. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, Expedition 32 flight engineer, works with Robonaut 2 humanoid robot in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.
https://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/station/crew-32/inflight/ndxpage33.html


1) ISS033-E-011647 (14 Oct. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, Expedition 33 commander, uses a tool while working on a rack in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.
2) ISS033-E-016439 (27 Oct. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, Expedition 33 commander, uses a computer in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, flight engineer, is at right.


1) ISS033-E-018400 (1 Nov. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, Expedition 33 commander, is pictured in the Quest airlock of the International Space Station as she prepares for the start of a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) outside the International Space Station on Nov. 1, 2012. Williams is wearing an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuit.
2) ISS033-E-017974 (1 Nov. 2012) --- Expedition 33 Commander Sunita Williams, NASA astronaut, participates in a 6-hour, 38-minute spacewalk outside the International Space Station on Nov. 1, 2012. During the spacewalk, Williams and Akihiko Hoshide, who represents the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), ventured outside the orbital outpost to perform work and to support ground-based troubleshooting of an ammonia leak.


ISS033-E-022004 (17 Nov. 2012) --- Expedition 32/33 and Expedition 33/34 crew members are pictured in the International Space Station's Destiny laboratory during the ceremony of Changing-of-Command from Expedition 33 to Expedition 34. Pictured on the front row are NASA astronauts Sunita Williams, Expedition 33 commander, and Kevin Ford, Expedition 34 commander. Pictured on the back row (from the left) are Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, Expedition 33 flight engineer; Russian cosmonauts Oleg Novitskiy and Evgeny Tarelkin, both Expedition 34 flight engineers; and Yuri Malenchenko, Expedition 33 flight engineer.
https://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/station/crew-33/inflight/ndxpage19.html




201211190021hq (19 Nov. 2012) --- Expedition 33 crew members; Commander Sunita Williams of NASA, left, Flight Engineers Yuri Malenchenko of Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), and Akihiko Hoshide of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), right, smile for photos at the Kustanay Airport in Kazakhstan a few hours after they landed their Soyuz spacecraft in a remote area outside the town of Arkalyk, Kazakhstan on Nov. 19, 2012 (Kazakhstan time). Williams, Hoshide and Malenchenko returned from four months onboard the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls
https://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/station/crew-33/postflight/ndxpage1.html

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Odp: Sunita Williams 19.09.1965
« Odpowiedź #3 dnia: Wrzesień 20, 2020, 04:40 »
NASA veteran Sunita Williams tells us what it’s like to get ready to fly a new spacecraft
By Loren Grush@lorengrush  Sep 12, 2018, 3:03pm EDT

The two-time flyer will soon fly commercial


Image: NASA

NASA astronaut Sunita “Suni” Williams is about to embark on a whole new adventure in space: commanding the first operational flight of Boeing’s new space capsule, the CST-100 Starliner. And when she flies, it will mark just the second time that the Starliner has ever hosted a crew.

Boeing has been developing the Starliner as part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program, an initiative to send NASA astronauts to and from the International Space Station on private US spacecraft. A second company, SpaceX, is also developing a vehicle for the program — a passenger version of the company’s Dragon cargo capsule. After four years of development, the capsules are finally nearing completion and the companies are preparing to fly their vehicles for the first time. First, both SpaceX and Boeing will fly their spacecraft without crew, and if those flights go well, then they’ll put people on board. These crewed flights will help NASA determine if the capsules are safe, and if the space agency approves, the companies will then begin flying regular missions to and from the ISS.

On August 3rd, NASA selected the astronauts that will fly on these inaugural flight. Williams will be part of the first operational mission of the Starliner, along with rookie astronaut Josh Cassada. That means she and Cassada will fly once the very first crewed flight test of the vehicle is complete. She and Cassada won’t be alone, though. They’ll have two other astronauts on board, assigned by NASA’s international partners.

This will be Williams’ third trip to space. Having flown on both a Space Shuttle mission and a Russian Soyuz rocket, Williams has spent a cumulative 322 days in low Earth orbit and has seven spacewalks under her belt — once the record for any female astronaut. Williams has known she’d be part of the first Commercial Crew flights since 2015, when NASA announced the four astronauts, including her, that would be involved with the program. It was only this year that she learned which flight she would be on.

The Verge spoke with Williams about her experience in the Commercial Crew Program up to this point, and how things will change now that she’s been assigned to a crew.

This interview has been lightly edited for clarity.

How did you get involved in the Commercial Crew Program? Did you express interest in being picked to fly on these vehicles?

In 2015, I had come back from managing all the folks who go to Russia to train to go on Soyuz. Because I had flown on Soyuz, I have some background on that. I had also flown on the Shuttle and had done pretty much anything I thought I would do when I came into the Astronaut Office. And I was sort of ready to hand it over to the young guys.

Then this opportunity came up. And of course, we really don’t put our name in the hat. We’re just there, available, and we have all the qualifications. And it just so happened that the four of us who were selected all have two spaceflights under our belts. So we had experience, and I think that’s what folks are looking for — to bring experience into the companies. And so we worked with them for the next couple of years before we got assigned to specific flights.



Image: NASA

And at that time, we really didn’t know which company [we were going to fly with]. That’s how it goes in our office. You’re called when you’re needed to go do what they need you to do.

Can you talk about what training has been like so far and how things have changed since you’ve been assigned?

There’s definitely a difference from when the four of us were selected — Bob Behnken, Doug Hurley, Eric Boe, and myself — for the cadre in summer of 2015. When we were selected for that, our sole focus was going from company to company, seeing what they’re doing, and trying to help in any way we can. It was not very scheduled. It was a little more haphazard as the companies were getting ready, because essentially the Power Points were starting to become hardware.

Now at this point in time, the hardware’s pretty much getting done. And so we’ve already put a lot of influence into the spacecraft, and now we’re working to see how the testing is going. And in the meantime, we’re going through all the training with the trainers. They’re going to have to train follow-on crews, and so we’re evaluating that [process] from the experience we’ve had from training both for the Shuttle and the Soyuz and for the space station. So now it’s not as haphazard. It’s a little more defined than it has been in the past. Although, it’s very fluid because with every test you learn something new and you have to do something else, right? But at least there’s sort of a schedule for the testing, and scattered in between that is actual training for the spacecraft and training for the space station.

And what are the biggest aspects of training? Since you’re doing a full-fledged mission, do you have an idea of what the mission profile will be yet?

[We] are starting to do more space station stuff. I’m getting my robotic evaluations next week, as a matter of fact. We’re starting to do spacewalk training, for general stuff. [Our flight date] is obviously quite a question right now, and when we go determines what spacewalks we could potentially do. There’s a set of batteries, for example, that need to be changed out in 2020. There are a set number of spacewalks that are out there, so there’s a good possibility when Josh and I are up there with our international partners we might get to do a couple of spacewalks.



Sunita Williams, with her fellow crew member Josh Cassada Image: NASA

So right now we’re doing all the generic training, just to make sure you keep your heels up in the pool and also in robotics. It’s getting pretty fun, because it’s actually getting real and it’s probably going to be within the next year and a half that all the crews that were assigned fly. That’s pretty awesome.

How has this training process compared to the process of training for the Soyuz?

Of course, it’s in the United States. So even if it’s in California or Florida or Texas, it’s nice. You’re not that many time zones away from your family and you’re home on the weekends, generally.

But the training flows are just becoming defined. We’re working with all the trainers here in Houston for Boeing, just establishing what’s important. The trainers are all a little nervous, because they don’t have all their T’s crossed and I’s dotted, because the vehicle is just being developed. As the vehicle’s becoming finalized, they’re rushing, scrambling to get the training done to make sure they understand it so they can teach it to us.



Williams training at the Neutral Buoyancy Lab in Houston Image: NASA

Soyuz is done. It’s been there; it’s the same thing. Of course, they do have upgrades, but the basics of the spacecraft have always remained the same. When you’re on a Soyuz flight, you know that when you go to Russia you’re going to do X, Y, and Z. You have that plan already laid out. For us, we’re helping define it with the trainers on both companies, so it’s pretty fun. You weigh what things are important, and what things are not important. You can learn about every nut and bolt on the spacecraft, but that’s knowledge that you’re not going to use when you’re up there. So we’re helping them make the priorities about “what does this mean for the person sitting in the spacecraft?”

Since you’re on the Boeing flight, the company has set up most of its training facilities in Houston as opposed to SpaceX, which is in California. Does it help having training so close to home?

Of course it’s nice. It’s right here. There’s one downside in comparison to both Soyuz and SpaceX, is that when you go to those places — when I went to Russia or when I went to California — you’re sort of focused on what you’re doing. Your family’s not there. Your lawn isn’t needing to be cut. You’re just focusing on what you need to do. But when you’re home, you get distracted, of course. A whole bunch of life is going on.

But it’s also great. For example, we’re helping the folks with the software at night and it’s not a big deal. Okay fine, I’ll go home and have dinner with my family, and then I’ll go back to the simulator at night and help them work through their software process. That’s pretty cool. You don’t feel like you’re putting your family out, because you can be home for dinner, be home for a soccer game, and then go work. So that’s nice.

Were you involved in the selection process for your flight?

All of us were asked. I mean, of course. We’re America; we ask people what their inputs are. [laughs] To be honest with you, I was a little surprised, and I think there were a couple of other people who were a little surprised. But we’re all pinching ourselves, because it’s an amazing opportunity to fly on either one of those flights.

So it’s all good. We’re all happy, and I think it actually worked out really well. I’m so excited that I’m flying with Josh. Seeing him for the first time go to space, and then be a full-up crew member — that’s pretty cool. So we’re all a little surprised, but our bosses knew what they were doing. And I’m happy with the whole situation.

How do you think the Boeing and SpaceX capsules compare to one another?

They both have the same goal, so they’re fairly similar. They both go from Earth to the station, so size-wise they’re similar. Both of them are automated, which is awesome. That’s what we wanted. Both suits are comfortable. Other suits in the past have been a little bit bulky or made you sort of hunch over a little bit. These suits don’t do that. They’ve taken into account feedback people have had.



Williams in Boeing’s Starliner mockup in Houston Image: NASA

Folks have seen the cockpits of the spacecraft. Right now, there are hand controllers on the Boeing spacecraft, which always makes a pilot happy. There are no hand controllers right now on the SpaceX vehicle, which makes people go, “Oh that’s interesting. How are you going to handle that problem if you had to manually fly?” It’s just little different ways to solve problems.

SpaceX has been farther away from the government than Boeing has, obviously. So they’re unencumbered and trying maybe a couple new and innovative ideas, which is great. It’s awesome for the space business. I know we want this business to be successful, so we can all take advantage of these advances in technology. But they’re also a little risky. So we’ll also have to see how all that goes.

What are you looking forward to most for this upcoming launch?

Honestly, it’s coming back to the United States. I have a relatively new niece and nephew, who have never seen any of this. And there are lots of kids out there who have never been able to get into their minivan with their parents and drive to Florida. Seeing a launch from Florida, it’s huge. The first time I saw one, I couldn’t help but cry. I thought, “Wow that’s spectacular.” That’s what engineering is.

That’s what I think is the coolest thing: bringing the launches back to the US and thinking about the next possibility for this next generation going back to the Moon and onto Mars. This is just the start. It’s opening the window.

The Starliner is a new vehicle, but you will be the second ones to ride in it. What do you hope to learn from that first test flight? What kind of questions will you be asking the first crew to prepare for your trip?

The question I’ll be asking: “What did it sound like?” There are going to be explosions to make [pieces of hardware] fall off or the cover come off. These are things that we have no knowledge about until afterward. I think there’s going to be a recorder in both vehicles on the first flights just to hear and understand. We got audio back from EST-1, which is the experimental flight test of Orion, and it’s spectacular. You can hear the jets go, “boom, boom, boom, boom” when they fire. And you’re like, “Whoa, I wouldn’t have expected that.”

Is there anything that’s nerve-wracking for you or your family about going up on a brand-new spacecraft?

I’m totally confident, and the reason is that both of these spacecraft have systems that go: “Uh oh. Something’s wrong. Now what do I do? Back up.” It’s software that looks for anomalies and then re-configures the system. Both of them have that. And because of technology changes, they’ll have a lot of redundancies. I know there will be some software issues down the road, and so I have confidence that the vehicles have redundancies in their own fault-detection systems and then also have redundancy where the pilot can interact.

You mentioned earlier that you thought there weren’t going to be any more vehicles for you to fly on and then Commercial Crew popped up. Now there’s a big push to go back to the Moon. Would you be open to the possibility of maybe flying on SLS and Orion, or some other new vehicle, to go back to the lunar surface?

I would love to do that. But there are other people in our office who would love to do it, too. And I’ve had just an amazing career. I’d love to stick around and give my experience. If the opportunity came up and they said, “Suni, we need you.” Sure I would do it.

But I feel like that’s the whole reason I’m flying with Josh, for example. It’s our obligation to make sure these guys are ready to do bigger and bolder things like fly Orion. But if they want us, oh heck yeah, I’ll be there.


https://www.theverge.com/2018/9/12/17851100/nasa-astronaut-sunita-williams-commercial-crew-program-boeing-starliner

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Odp: Sunita Williams 19.09.1965
« Odpowiedź #3 dnia: Wrzesień 20, 2020, 04:40 »

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Odp: Sunita Williams 19.09.1965
« Odpowiedź #4 dnia: Wrzesień 20, 2020, 04:40 »
Here’s why NASA’s astronaut Sunita Williams took Bhagavad Gita to the space
By: Samrat Sharma | Updated: Jul 27, 2020 2:54 PM

Astronaut Sunita Williams revealed how spacewalking can give a fatal challenge to even the one who has decades of training.

Spacewalking is one daring task where a decision of a millisecond can become a reason for life or death. Once a woman with the most spacewalks, Astronaut Sunita Williams revealed how spacewalking can give a fatal challenge to even the one who has decades of training. In a webinar organised by Kalam Centre, Delhi, Sunita Williams said that while spacewalking it is always on the back of the mind whether the hands are holding handrails very tight or if the feet are well adjusted in the little platforms. While speaking to Samrat Sharma of Financial Express Online, the astronaut with more than 50 hours of spacewalking experience further said that in the worst-case scenario of being flown due to unbalance, there is a small jet pack known as safer which has a limited amount of nitrogen and can help the astronaut fly back, however, no one had used it so far.

Sunita Williams added that while spacewalking, hands have more work than legs as the legs are there to support while hands are used in translating from one place to another. After reaching the spot of work, the astronauts lock their feet in the small platforms and get their hands free to work. She also underlined that there is a chance to turn upside-down due to zero gravity and get confused but certain instruments like an antenna, etc, help astronauts to identify the correct direction and orient themselves accordingly.

How do astronauts work while spacewalking?

Sunita Williams added that while spacewalking, hands have more work than legs as the legs are there to support while hands are used in translating from one place to another. After reaching the spot of work, the astronauts lock their feet in the small platforms and get their hands free to work. She also underlined that there is a chance to turn upside-down due to zero gravity and get confused but certain instruments like an antenna, etc, help astronauts to identify the correct direction and orient themselves accordingly.

First thought after looking at earth from space

The Indian-American astronaut also shared her thoughts that she had after seeing earth for the first time from space. She said that the first thought that passed her mind was, “Look at this amazing planet with a spectacular view! This is one earth that we have, in fact, all we have. People, planet, and animal, on a piece of rock in this universe. We should take good care of ourselves, each other, and this planet.”

Why Sunita Williams carried Bhagavad Gita, Upanishad to space

While answering to Srijan Pal Singh, who has worked closely with India’s missile man A.P.J. Abdul Kalam, Sunita Williams said that she took Bhagavad Gita and Upanishad to space to derive inspiration from them. She added that these books enlightened her about what she was doing and why she was doing things, and also showed her the purpose of life. She further said that inspirations from these books help to keep the person grounded.

https://www.financialexpress.com/lifestyle/science/heres-why-nasas-astronaut-sunita-williams-took-bhagavad-gita-to-the-space/2036330/

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« Odpowiedź #5 dnia: Wrzesień 20, 2020, 04:41 »
Suni on Hometown TV
84 182 wyświetlenia•12 paź 2012 NASA



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Station Tour: Harmony, Tranquility, Unity
6 914 177 wyświetleń•20 lis 2012



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Odp: Sunita Williams 19.09.1965
« Odpowiedź #6 dnia: Wrzesień 20, 2020, 04:41 »
The Sunita Willams Interview
30 868 wyświetleń•28 lut 2016



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I had samosas in space with me, says astronaut Sunita Williams
218 523 wyświetlenia•2 kwi 2013 NDTV
Astronaut Sunita Williams, who is visiting India, spoke today at the National Science Centre in Delhi.



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Message from Sunita Williams | Panel Discussion 2018
46 977 wyświetleń•15 sie 2018



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Boeing's Starliner Capsule Named Calypso
43 wyświetlenia•31 gru 2019
NASA's Boeing Astronaut Sunita "Sunny" Williams names Starliner capsule Calypso, paying homage to Jacques Cousteau and his ship



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Odp: Sunita Williams 19.09.1965
« Odpowiedź #7 dnia: Wrzesień 20, 2020, 04:41 »
Sunita Williams @Astro_Suni 5:25 PM · 25 sie 2020
Welcome to our CTS Starliner 1 crew Dr Jeanette Epps!!!!
https://twitter.com/Astro_Suni/status/1298280432379793408

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Odp: Sunita Williams 19.09.1965
« Odpowiedź #7 dnia: Wrzesień 20, 2020, 04:41 »