Autor Wątek: Indyjski program kosmiczny  (Przeczytany 33600 razy)

0 użytkowników i 1 Gość przegląda ten wątek.

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9757
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Indyjski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #165 dnia: Marzec 27, 2019, 21:13 »
Indie zestrzeliły własnego satelitę
  27.03. około 05:40 Indie zestrzeliły za pomocą rakiety antysatelitarnej PDV-Mk 2 własnego satelitę Microsat-R,
wystrzelonego w dniu 24.01.2019. Satelita poruszał się na orbicie o parametrach: hp=267,4 km, ha=289,1 km.
http://lk.astronautilus.pl/n190316.htm#03

Modi's space weapon announcement struggles for lift-off

India’s PM criticised for making televised address about missile test during election campaign


India’s prime minister, Narendra Modi, gave a surprise televised address on Wednesday morning. Photograph: Prakash Singh/AFP/Getty Images

India’s prime minister, Narendra Modi, has announced the successful test of the country’s first space weapon, an anti-satellite missile, in a surprise televised address in the middle of the election campaign.

The dramatic nature of the announcement – during a caretaker period when governments are restricted in what they promote – drew criticism alongside praise for India’s space scientists.

Modi said on Wednesday morning that India was the fourth country to acquire the ability to shoot down satellites, after the US, Russia and China.

“Some time back, our scientists have hit a live satellite 300km away in low-Earth orbit,” Modi said, hailing the indigenously produced receptor as a major step forward for the country’s national security. “India has made an unprecedented achievement today,” he said. “India registered its name as a space power.” (...)

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/mar/27/modi-space-weapon-announcement-struggles-for-lift-off#img-1

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9757
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Indyjski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #166 dnia: Marzec 27, 2019, 21:18 »
India tests anti-satellite weapon
by Jeff Foust — March 27, 2019


Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced the anti-satellite test in a televised speech March 27. Credit: Office of the Prime Minister of India

WASHINGTON — The Indian government announced March 27 it successfully fired a ground-based anti-satellite weapon against a satellite in low Earth orbit, a test that is likely to heighten concerns about space security and orbital debris.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi said that the country’s military successfully demonstrated an anti-satellite (ASAT) weapon in a test known as “Mission Shakti.” In that test, a ground-based missile, a version of an existing ballistic missile interceptor, hit a satellite at an altitude of about 300 kilometers.

“It shows the remarkable dexterity of India’s outstanding scientists and the success of our space programme,” Modi said in a series of tweets announcing the test. Modi also made a televised announcement, in Hindi, about the test.


According to a statement from India’s Ministry of External Affairs, the missile was launched from the Dr. A P J Abdul Kalam Island launch complex in the northeast part of the country. The missile struck an unidentified Indian satellite. “The test was fully successful and achieved all parameters as per plans,” the ministry stated.

Neither Modi nor the ministry identified the satellite targeted by the test. Indian media speculated that the likely targets were either Microsat-R, launched in January, or Microsat-TD, launched a year earlier. Microsat-R is in a 262-by-280-kilometer orbit, while Microsat-TD is in a 353-by-361-kilometer orbit, according to tracking data by the U.S. military.

The ministry said in its statement that the test was designed to minimize long-lived debris. “The test was done in the lower atmosphere to ensure that there is no space debris. Whatever debris that is generated will decay and fall back onto the earth within weeks.” It wasn’t immediately known how much debris the test generated, but some debris may end up in higher orbits with longer decay times.

The test makes India the fourth country, after the United States, Russia and China, to test an ASAT weapon. Modi and his government said that the test both demonstrated the capabilities of India’s overall space program as well as showed its willingness to defend its satellites against attacks.

“The test was done to verify that India has the capability to safeguard our space assets,” the ministry said in its statement. “It is the Government of India’s responsibility to defend the country’s interests in outer space.”

“India stands tall as a space power!” Modi declared. “It will make India stronger, even more secure and will further peace and harmony.”

The test, though, could increase concerns about the security of space assets in general. A February report by the Defense Intelligence Agency highlighted efforts by China and Russia to develop ASAT capabilities, including both ground-based missiles and other technologies, although neither country has performed a debris-generating test since China destroyed one of its own satellites with a ground-based missile in 2007, generating a large amount of debris that triggered international criticism.

The United States performed its own similar test in February 2008, destroying the USA 193 satellite using a modified version of a ship-based SM-3 missile in a test called Operation Burnt Frost. The satellite was in an orbit about 250 kilometers high when it was successfully intercepted, and the U.S. government, which announced the test in advance, said it was designed to minimize the creation of debris. Most of the debris from that test did reenter within weeks, although the last piece of debris tracked from that test remained in orbit until late 2009.

https://spacenews.com/india-tests-anti-satellite-weapon/

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9757
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Indyjski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #167 dnia: Marzec 27, 2019, 21:33 »
India shows it can destroy satellites in space, worrying experts about space debris
By Loren Grush@lorengrush  Mar 27, 2019, 11:50am EDT


The Indian PSLV rocket that launched Microsat-R in January.

India claims it has demonstrated the capability of destroying satellites in orbit by shooting one of its own satellites with a missile launched from Earth, the country’s prime minister, Narendra Modi, announced this morning. The test seemingly proves that India has mastered what is known as anti-satellite, or ASAT, technology. But experts argue that such actions are concerning, as they can create hundreds to thousands of pieces of debris in space.

India acknowledged back in 2012 that it had the “building blocks” for ASAT technology, and it has since tested ballistic missiles that have that capability. However, this most recent test is the first time that India actually intercepted a satellite with one of its missiles. “India has today established itself as a global space power,” Modi said during an address about the test. “So far only three countries in the world — USA, Russia, and China — had this capability.”

The test, called Mission Shakti, destroyed one of India’s own satellites that was in low Earth orbit around 186 miles (300 kilometers) up, according to Modi. It took just three minutes for the missile to reach its target. Modi did not name the satellite, but Indian media and amateur satellite trackers believe that the destroyed probe was Microsat-R. Weighing 1,630 pounds (740 kilograms), Microsat-R was a medium-sized military imaging satellite that was launched in January by the Indian Space Research Organization. (...)

https://www.theverge.com/2019/3/27/18283730/india-anti-satellite-demonstration-asat-test-microsat-r-space-debris

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9757
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Indyjski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #168 dnia: Marzec 29, 2019, 22:02 »
Jeszcze  Rosja nie przeprowadziła podobnego testu.
https://www.space24.pl/rosja-testuje-bron-antysatelitarna
Może przyszłością będą metody niedestrukcyjnego eliminowania satelitów ?

Boycott Indian launchers? Industry reacts to India’s anti-satellite weapon test
by Debra Werner — March 27, 2019

(...) Laura Grego of the Union of Concerned Scientists also expressed concern about the spread of anti-satellite weapons and their increasing sophistication. “That increases the risks of a crisis getting sparked or escalated because someone uses or threatens to destroy someone else’s critical national security satellite,” Grego, a senior scientist in the Union of Concerned Scientists Global Security Program, said by email.

Destroying a satellite with a ground-based missile as India, the United States and China have all done, “creates enormous amounts of space debris when used,” Grego said. India destroyed a satellite at an altitude of 300 kilometers, meaning the cloud of debris created will not be in orbit long. Using a similar weapon to target “a satellite in a more common orbit would create debris that lasts decades,” she said.

 Multinational organizations including the Conference on Disarmament and the United Nations Group of Governmental Experts have failed to reach agreement on arms control treaties or voluntary codes of conduct for space activities, Union of Concerned Scientists said in a March 27 news release.

“The international effort to ensure space remains a peaceful and secure environment is not keeping up with the spread of these technologies, and India’s test makes it harder to see progress on that. In fact, it’s possible that India’s test encourages others to test, too,” Grego said.

https://spacenews.com/reactions-to-indian-asat/

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9757
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Indyjski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #169 dnia: Marzec 30, 2019, 22:12 »
Indyjski test ASAT
BY KRZYSZTOF KANAWKA ON 30 MARCA 2019


Symulacja indyjskiego testu ASAT - 27.03.2019 / Credits - Analytical Graphics, Inc.

Dwudziestego siódmego marca Indie przeprowadziły test broni antysatelitarnej. Jak na razie dość niewiele wiadomo na temat tego wydarzenia.

Indie to państwo, które aktywnie rozwija cywilne i wojskowe techniki satelitarne oraz rakietowe. Od strony cywilnej dokonania Indii są szeroko znane – rakiety z tego państwa regularnie wynoszą satelity z całego świata. W branży wojskowej Indie mają także pewne znaczne osiągnięcia – m.in. międzykontynentalne pociski balistyczne, zdolne do przenoszenia broni jądrowej. Każdego roku Indie przeprowadzają także serię testów o charakterze wojskowym.
Dotychczas niewiele było informacji na temat możliwości Indii w tematyce broni antysatelitarnej (ASAT). Bronią tego typu obecnie dysponuje z pewnością USA, Chiny i Rosja. Dość nieoczekiwanie, 27 marca 2019, Indie przeprowadziły test swojego pocisku ASAT. Do publicznej wiadomości nie podano zbyt wiele informacji. Co ciekawe, rząd Indii poinformował, że pocisk ASAT uderzył w satelitę z dokładnością zaledwie kilku centymetrów. Poinformowano także, że na pokładzie pocisku ASAT nie znajdował się żaden ładunek bojowy – pocisk sam w sobie był formą uderzenia “kinetycznego”.

Poniższe nagranie prezentuje zestaw dostępnych (niezależnych) informacji o indyjskim teście ASAT. Nagranie sporządziła firma Analytical Graphics, tworząca m.in. oprogramowanie do analiz startów rakiet i orbit.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KEzTodnP0mQ" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KEzTodnP0mQ</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KEzTodnP0mQ

Indyjski test ASAT / Credits – Analytical Graphics, Inc.

Wiadomo obecnie, że prawdopodobnym celem indyjskiego testu ASAT był satelita Microsat-R, który został umieszczony na niskiej orbicie okołoziemskiej (LEO) w styczniu 2019. Wyliczenia sugerują, że uderzenie w tego satelitę mogłoby stworzyć nawet 6500 szczątków większych od 0,5 cm. Jak na razie jednak nie skatalogowano szczątków po tym teście broni ASAT. Warto tu dodać, że satelita Microsat-R przebywał w momencie testu na bardzo niskiej orbicie (poniżej 300 km), co oznacza, że duża część fragmentów mogła już spłonąć w atmosferze.

Jest możliwe, że w najbliższych tygodniach dowiemy się więcej na temat tego testu. Prawdopodobnie informacje będą pochodzić od niezależnych źródeł – trudno się spodziewać, by Indie podały parametry swojej broni ASAT. Jest jednak możliwe, że Indie przedstawią kilka dodatkowych informacji.

(AGI)
https://kosmonauta.net/2019/03/indyjski-test-asat/

O styczniowym starcie http://www.forum.kosmonauta.net/index.php?topic=3368.msg127973#msg127973

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9757
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Indyjski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #170 dnia: Marzec 30, 2019, 22:31 »
Indie zestrzeliły satelitę
27 marca 2019 Paweł Ziemnicki


Pociski Prithvi Air Defense Interceptor (po lewej) i Prithvi Defense Vehicle (PDV). Fot. DRDO

Indie z powodzeniem przetestowały broń antysatelitarną (ASAT). Zniszczyły urządzenie operujące na stosunkowo małej wysokości, na niskiej orbicie okołoziemskiej (LEO). Kraj ten dołączył tym samym do nader wąskiego grona państw, zdolnych do destrukcji krążących w przestrzeni kosmicznej satelitów.

Do tej pory zdolność niszczenia satelitów działających na LEO wykazały jedynie USA, Chiny i Rosja. Wiosną 2019 r. do tego klubu dołączają Indie.

O skutecznym przetestowaniu broni ASAT poinformował w środę 27 marca br. premier Indii, Narendra Modi, w nieoczekiwanym orędziu do narodu, transmitowanym przez telewizję.

Siły zbrojne Indii wykorzystały pocisk do zniszczenia satelity operującego na wysokości 300 km ponad powierzchnią Ziemi. Przeprowadzona operacja nosiła kryptonim „Mission Shakti”. Wykonanie całego zadania zajęło ponoć zaledwie trzy minuty. Spekulacje medialne wskazują, że pociskiem użytym do zniszczenia satelity mógł być Prithvi Defence Vehicle (PDV).

Premier Narendra Modi podkreślił, że udany test broni ASAT stanowi ważny krok na rzecz zagwarantowania jego krajowi bezpieczeństwa, wzrostu gospodarczego i postępu technologicznego. Za sukces misji pochwalił krajową agencję rządową DRDO (Defence Research and Development Organisation).

Indie zaprezentowały się dziś jako kosmiczna potęga.
           Narendra Modi, premier Indii

Modi zapewnił, że generalnie rzecz biorąc New Delhi opowiada się przeciwko militaryzacji kosmosu, zaś test broni antysatelitarnej nie był wymierzony w żadne konkretne państwo. Indiom zależeć ma przede wszystkim na zapewnieniu własnego bezpieczeństwa.

Pozytywne jest to, że satelitę zniszczono w stosunkowo mało używanym przedziale orbity LEO, bo na wysokości tylko 300 km. Powstałe po rozpadzie zniszczonego urządzenia śmieci kosmiczne nie będę zatem stanowiły zagrożenia dla większości satelitów operujących wyżej na niskiej orbicie okołoziemskiej, a ponadto śmieci te relatywnie szybko spłoną w atmosferze planety. W 2007 r. Chińczycy strzelili w satelitę meteorologicznego znajdującego się na wysokości powyżej 800 km. Powstała wówczas chmura odpadów stanowi po dziś dzień problem i niebezpieczeństwo dla licznych satelitów na LEO.

Jak przewiduje portal thediplomat.com, demonstracja zdolności ASAT przez Indie może wywołać zaniepokojenie Pakistanu. Udana próba może zostać odczytana jako zwiększenie zdolności sił zbrojnych w dyspozycji New Delhi do przechwytywania wrogich rakiet balistycznych.

https://www.space24.pl/indie-zestrzelily-satelite

Artykuły astronautyczne
« Ostatnia zmiana: Kwiecień 02, 2019, 23:58 wysłana przez Orionid »

Offline maackn

  • Nowy
  • *
  • Wiadomości: 19
Odp: Indyjski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #171 dnia: Kwiecień 05, 2019, 18:40 »
Nie wiem czy już ktoś wstawiał:
https://youtu.be/kO_YH0lJ4PU

Start rakiet widziany z pokłady samolotu.

Offline ah

  • Senior
  • ****
  • Wiadomości: 714
Odp: Indyjski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #172 dnia: Kwiecień 05, 2019, 19:40 »
Analiza rozkładu szczątków, czasu ich życia na orbicie i potencjalnego zagrożenia dla ISS  po indyjskim teście antysatelitarnym:
https://sattrackcam.blogspot.com/2019/04/first-debris-pieces-from-indian-asat.html



Offline Limax7

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 873
  • .: I love comets :.
    • adamhurcewicz.wordpress.com
Odp: Indyjski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #173 dnia: Kwiecień 06, 2019, 19:57 »
Marco Langbroek przewiduje że w ciągu kilku tygodni większość odłamków satelity spali się w atmosferze Ziemi, a w przeciągu pół roku wszystkie. Czyli bardzo możliwe że będą fajerwerki na niebie i sporo zgłoszeń o bolidach.
Adam Hurcewicz
Uniwersał 150/900
Nikon D3200 + Nikkor AF-S 18-105mm + Sigma APO 70-300mm

Białystok, Polska
http://adamhurcewicz.wordpress.com

Offline ah

  • Senior
  • ****
  • Wiadomości: 714
Odp: Indyjski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #174 dnia: Kwiecień 07, 2019, 15:28 »
Jeszcze jeden filmik dotyczący indyjskiej próby antysatelitarnej. Widać w nim trochę szczegółów pocisku przechwytującego i zastosowanych technologii (wszystkie typowe również dla obrony przeciwrakietowej np. amerykańskiej GMD).

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AK0tc87_n-4" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AK0tc87_n-4</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AK0tc87_n-4

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9757
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Indyjski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #175 dnia: Kwiecień 09, 2019, 09:28 »
Nowe informacje o indyjskim teście ASAT
BY KRZYSZTOF KANAWKA ON 8 KWIETNIA 2019

(...) Dość nieoczekiwanie, 27 marca 2019, Indie przeprowadziły test swojego pocisku ASAT. Rząd Indii poinformował, że pocisk ASAT uderzył w satelitę z dokładnością zaledwie kilku centymetrów. Poinformowano także, że na pokładzie pocisku ASAT nie znajdował się żaden ładunek bojowy – pocisk sam w sobie był formą uderzenia “kinetycznego”. (...)

W ciągu tygodnia od tego testu pojawiło się więcej informacji na temat tego testu ASAT. Pojawiły się także komentarze, że niektóre ze szczątków mogą zagrozić Międzynarodowej Stacji Kosmicznej (ISS), która krąży wokół Ziemi po orbicie o wysokości około 400 km.

Ponadto, wiadomo już, że ten test ASAT wygenerował kilka tysięcy szczątków. Jak na razie skatalogowano 46 szczątków, których orbity mają swoje apogeum powyżej orbity ISS. Jeden ze szczątków ma apogeum powyżej 2200 km. Z kolei perygeum dla każdego ze szczątków ma wysokość pomiędzy 159 – 282 km. Znakomita większość szczątków spłonie w atmosferze w ciągu najbliższych 6 miesięcy – jest jednak ryzyko, że kilka odłamków pozostanie dłużej, nawet do roku.

Już pierwszy zestaw danych parametrów orbitalnych wskazuje, że szczątki powstałe w tym teście zbliżają się do wielu satelitów na odległości mniejsze od 5 km. W najbliższych tygodniach takich zbliżeń będzie blisko sto. Niektóre ze zbliżeń są do satelitów albo już nieczynnych, albo dysponujących ograniczonymi możliwościami manewrowymi (np. typu CubeSat).

Przynajmniej kilka skatalogowanych szczątków już spłonęło w atmosferze. Niemniej jednak jest jasne, że wiele z wytworzonych szczątków stwarza realne zagrożenie dla satelitów oraz ISS. Ten test to wyraźne potwierdzenie, że broń ASAT nie może być “czysta” i niesie ze sobą zagrożenie.

(TSK, PFA)
https://kosmonauta.net/2019/04/nowe-informacje-o-indyjskim-tescie-asat/
« Ostatnia zmiana: Kwiecień 10, 2019, 10:43 wysłana przez Orionid »

Online Adam.Przybyla

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 3834
  • Realista do bólu;-)
Odp: Indyjski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #176 dnia: Maj 12, 2019, 07:14 »
Troche sobie jeszcze poczekamy:
https://www.firstpost.com/india/only-one-of-three-chandrayaan-2-modules-are-mission-ready-ahead-of-launch-isro-6586421.html/amp
Z powazaniem
                       Adam Przybyla
https://twitter.com/AdamPrzybyla
JID: adam.przybyla@gmail.com

Offline Orionid

  • Weteran
  • *****
  • Wiadomości: 9757
  • Very easy - Harrison Schmitt
Odp: Indyjski program kosmiczny
« Odpowiedź #177 dnia: Lipiec 17, 2019, 01:12 »
Indyjski test ASAT – szczątki nadal na orbicie
BY KRZYSZTOF KANAWKA ON 14 LIPCA 2019

(...) Pod koniec czerwca na orbicie wciąż pozostawało ponad 45 szczątków z testów. Około 50 znanych szczątków dokonało już deorbitacji. Warto się zmieniają, gdyż nadal dodawane są nowe pozycje do katalogu “śmieci kosmicznych”, powstałych z tego testu – jest to wynik dalszych obserwacji i detekcji nowych fragmentów na orbicie.

W tej chwili przewiduje się, że kolejne 30 fragmentów powinno zejść z orbity do czerwca 2020. Kilkanaście pozostałych szczątków pozostanie dłużej na swoich orbitach, nawet do kilku lub kilkunastu lat. (...)

https://kosmonauta.net/2019/07/indyjski-test-asat-szczatki-nadal-na-orbicie/