Autor Wątek: Alan LaVern Bean (1932-2018)  (Przeczytany 1417 razy)

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Alan LaVern Bean (1932-2018)
« dnia: Maj 26, 2018, 20:12 »
W dniu 26.05.2018 w wieku 86 lat zmarł 4 człowiek spacerujący po Księżycu Alan Bean.

Cześć jego pamięci!

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Odp: Alan LaVern Bean (1932-2018)
« Odpowiedź #1 dnia: Maj 26, 2018, 20:21 »
Informacja z NASA:

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/family-release-regarding-the-passing-of-apollo-skylab-astronaut-alan-bean

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May 26, 2018
RELEASE 18-044
Family Release Regarding the Passing of Apollo, Skylab Astronaut Alan Bean

The following is an obituary article released on the behalf of Alan Bean’s family:

Alan Bean, Apollo Moonwalker and Artist, Dies at 86

HOUSTON, Texas — Apollo and Skylab astronaut Alan Bean, the fourth human to walk on the moon and an accomplished artist, has died.

Bean, 86, died on Saturday, May 26, at Houston Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas. His death followed his suddenly falling ill while on travel in Fort Wayne, Indiana two weeks before.

“Alan was the strongest and kindest man I ever knew. He was the love of my life and I miss him dearly,” said Leslie Bean, Alan Bean’s wife of 40 years. “A native Texan, Alan died peacefully in Houston surrounded by those who loved him.”

A test pilot in the U.S. Navy, Bean was one of 14 trainees selected by NASA for its third group of astronauts in October 1963. He flew twice into space, first as the lunar module pilot on Apollo 12, the second moon landing mission, in November 1969, and then as commander of the second crewed flight to the United States’ first space station, Skylab, in July 1973.

“Alan and I have been best friends for 55 years — ever since the day we became astronauts,” said Walt Cunningham, who flew on Apollo 7. “When I became head of the Skylab Branch of the Astronaut Office, we worked together and Alan eventually commanded the second Skylab mission.”

“We have never lived more than a couple of miles apart, even after we left NASA. And for years, Alan and I never missed a month where we did not have a cheeseburger together at Miller’s Café in Houston. We are accustomed to losing friends in our business but this is a tough one,” said Cunningham.

On Nov. 19, 1969, Bean, together with Apollo 12 commander Charles “Pete” Conrad, landed on the Ocean of Storms and became the fourth human to walk on the moon. During two moonwalks Bean helped deploy several surface experiments and installed the first nuclear-powered generator station on the moon to provide the power source. He and Conrad inspected a robotic Surveyor spacecraft and collected 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rocks and lunar soil for study back on Earth.

“Alan and Pete were extremely engaged in the planning for their exploration of the Surveyor III landing site in the Ocean of Storms and, particularly, in the enhanced field training activity that came with the success of Apollo 11. This commitment paid off with Alan's and Pete's collection of a fantastic suite of lunar samples, a scientific gift that keeps on giving today and in the future,” said Harrison Schmitt, Apollo 17 lunar module pilot and the only geologist to walk on the moon. “Their description of bright green concentrations of olivine (peridot) as ‘ginger ale bottle glass,’ however, gave geologists in Mission Control all a big laugh, as we knew exactly what they had discovered.”

“When Alan's third career as the artist of Apollo moved forward, he would call me to ask about some detail about lunar soil, color or equipment he wanted to have represented exactly in a painting. Other times, he wanted to discuss items in the description he was writing to go with a painting. His enthusiasm about space and art never waned. Alan Bean is one of the great renaissance men of his generation — engineer, fighter pilot, astronaut and artist,” said Schmitt.

Four years after Apollo 12, Bean commanded the second crew to live and work on board the Skylab orbital workshop. During the then-record-setting 59-day, 24.4 million-mile flight, Bean and his two crewmates generated 18 miles of computer tape during surveys of Earth’s resources and 76,000 photographs of the Sun to help scientists better understand its effects on the solar system.

In total, Bean logged 69 days, 15 hours and 45 minutes in space, including 31 hours and 31 minutes on the moon’s surface.

Bean retired from the Navy in 1975 and NASA in 1981. In the four decades since, he devoted his time to creating an artistic record of humanity’s first exploration of another world. His Apollo-themed paintings featured canvases textured with lunar boot prints and were made using acrylics embedded with small pieces of his moon dust-stained mission patches.

“Alan Bean was the most extraordinary person I ever met,” said astronaut Mike Massimino, who flew on two space shuttle missions to service the Hubble Space Telescope. “He was a one of a kind combination of technical achievement as an astronaut and artistic achievement as a painter.”

“But what was truly extraordinary was his deep caring for others and his willingness to inspire and teach by sharing his personal journey so openly.  Anyone who had the opportunity to know Alan was a better person for it, and we were better astronauts by following his example.  I am so grateful he was my mentor and friend, and I will miss him terribly.  He was a great man and this is a great loss,” Massimino said.

Born March 15, 1932, in Wheeler, Texas, Bean received a Bachelor of Science degree in aeronautical engineering from the University of Texas in 1955. He attended the Navy Test Pilot School and accumulated more than 5,500 hours of flying time in 27 different types of aircraft.

He is survived by his wife Leslie, a sister Paula Stott, and two children from a prior marriage, a daughter Amy Sue and son Clay.



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Odp: Alan LaVern Bean (1932-2018)
« Odpowiedź #2 dnia: Maj 26, 2018, 20:23 »
https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-administrator-reflects-on-legacy-record-breaking-skylab-apollo-astronaut

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NASA Administrator Reflects on Legacy Record-Breaking Skylab, Apollo Astronaut

The following is a statement from NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine on the passing of Apollo and Skylab astronaut Alan Bean:

“Alan Bean once said ‘I have the nicest life in the world.’ It’s a comforting sentiment to recall as we mourn his passing.

“As all great explorers are, Alan was a boundary pusher. Rather than accepting the limits of technology, science, and even imagination, he sought to advance those lines -- in all his life’s endeavors. Commissioned in the U.S. Navy in 1955, he chose the challenging pursuit of flight training and, after four years as a Naval pilot, decided to challenge himself further by attended the Navy Test Pilot School and becoming a test pilot.

“He joined NASA’s astronaut corps in 1963 and, just six years later, was piloting the lunar module for the Apollo 12 mission. During that mission, he walked on the Moon. Yet he pushed farther. In 1973, Alan commanded the Skylab Mission II and broke a world record with a 59-day flight traversing 24.4 million miles. In all, he had a hand in breaking 11 world records in the areas of space and astronautics.

“After logging 1,671 hours and 45 minutes in space, Alan passed the baton to the next generation of astronauts and changed fronts, looking to push the boundaries of his own imagination and ability as an artist. Even in this endeavor, his passion for space exploration dominated, as depicted most powerfully is his work ‘Hello Universe.’ We will remember him fondly as the great explorer who reached out to embrace the universe.”

For more information about Bean’s NASA career, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/alan-bean



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Odp: Alan LaVern Bean (1932-2018)
« Odpowiedź #3 dnia: Maj 26, 2018, 20:26 »
http://www.collectspace.com/news/news-052618a-astronaut-alan-bean-obituary.html

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Astronaut Alan Bean, Apollo moonwalker-turned-artist, dies at 86

May 26, 2018

— Apollo astronaut Alan Bean, who shared his experiences as the fourth human to walk on the moon through paintings sprinkled with lunar dust, has died at the age of 86.

Bean died on Saturday (May 26) at Houston Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas, as confirmed by his wife, Leslie. His death followed his suddenly falling ill while on travel in Fort Wayne, Indiana two weeks ago.

"Alan was the strongest and kindest man I ever knew. He was the love of my life," said Leslie Bean in a statement released by the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation Saturday. "A native Texan, Alan died peacefully in Houston, surrounded by those who loved him."

A member of NASA's third group of astronauts selected in 1963, Bean flew twice into space, first as the lunar module pilot on the Apollo 12 moon landing mission in November 1969, and then as the commander of the second crewed expedition to the United States' first space station, Skylab, in July 1973.

In total, he logged 69 days, 15 hours and 45 minutes in space, including 31 hours and 31 minutes on the lunar surface. He then spent four decades interpreting what he saw as a professional artist.

An astronaut's journey

Bean's journey to the moon almost ended in a flash. Or rather two flashes, had it not been for his memory of an obscure switch in his spacecraft.

Launched on top of a Saturn V rocket on Nov. 14, 1969, Bean and his two Apollo 12 crewmates, Charles "Pete" Conrad and Richard "Dick" Gordon, were less than a minute into flight when their booster was struck by lightning, twice. The electrical discharge knocked out their power and garbled the telemetry streaming to Mission Control.

A quick-thinking flight controller, John Aaron, recalled a test from a year earlier that produced a similar data pattern and suggested the crew take "SCE to AUX," which would switch the spacecraft's signal conditioning equipment (SCE) to its backup.

"What the hell is that?" replied Conrad, saying out loud what Gordon and many of those in Mission Control were also thinking.

Fortunately, Bean remembered the switch — which was located over his shoulder — from an earlier training simulation.

"They call[ed] to get me to throw a switch, which I did," Bean recounted in a 1998 NASA oral history. "I didn't remember what the switch was for, either ... but it was giving them telemetry data."

With data again flowing, and with more switch throws by Bean and his crewmates during the remainder of the ascent into Earth orbit, the spacecraft recovered and was able to continue on its planned path to the moon.

Surveyor III, I presume

Five days after their launch, Bean and Conrad left Gordon in orbit about the moon on the command module "Yankee Clipper" and landed the lunar module "Intrepid" in the Ocean of Storms on the moon.

"My, that Sun is bright," remarked Bean as he took his first steps onto the surface.

Unlike Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin who preceded them to the moon on Apollo 11 four months earlier, Conrad and Bean had made a precision landing, touching down within walking distance of a target.

"There that thing is! Look at that!" exclaimed Bean, spotting the Surveyor 3 robotic lander, which NASA had sent to the moon in 1967.

During the second of two moonwalks together, Bean and Conrad retrieved several pieces of the Surveyor, which they returned to Earth for study, along with some 75 pounds (35 kilograms) of moon rock that they collected along the way.

Bean also left something of his behind. Stepping away from Intrepid to the lip of a large crater, Bean tossed his silver astronaut pin, a symbol worn by those who had yet to fly in space. (He would replace it with a gold pin after returning to Earth.)

"It'll be there for millions and millions of years," wrote Bean in 2000, "or until some tourist finds it and brings it back to Earth."

Bean, Conrad and Gordon splashed down in the Pacific Ocean on Nov. 24, 1969. Like the Apollo 11 crew before them, the three were recovered by the USS Hornet aircraft carrier and quarantined for 21 days as a precaution against any possibility of "moon germs."

A new frontier

Bean's second space mission was six times as long as Apollo 12 had been and it covered a distance 100 times that of the Earth to the moon.

Beginning with a launch on a Saturn IB rocket on July 28, 1973, Bean led the crew of Skylab II (or Skylab 3) of Owen Garriott and Jack Lousma for a 59-day stay on the United States' first space station.

"We now hold the world record for space flight," wrote Bean in his in-flight diary on Aug. 25, 1973. "We will be half [way] into our mission tomorrow night."

During their time aboard the orbital workshop, Bean, Garriott and Lousma carried out medical and biological experiments (including observing web formation with a pair of cross spiders named Arabella and Anita) and made observations of Earth and the Sun.

On the second of the mission's two spacewalks, Bean and Garriott went outside of the space station to collect experiments and replace film cassettes.

"Great EVA today — all happy tonight," Bean recorded in his diary.

The three crew members undocked their Apollo command module and returned to Earth on Sept. 25, 1973.

In flight

Alan LaVern Bean was born on March 15, 1932 in Wheeler, Texas. Bean received his Bachelor of Science degree in aeronautical engineering from the University of Texas in 1955. A Navy ROTC (Reserve Officer Training Corps) student, Bean was commissioned as an ensign upon graduation.

Following flight training, he was assigned to a jet attack squadron in Jacksonville, Florida, where he served for four years before reporting to the U.S. Navy Test Pilot School at Patuxent River, Maryland. As a test pilot, he logged 5,500 hours of flying time in 27 different types of aircraft.

"When I was doing that, the space program was born — Al Shepard, John Glenn and others —and when I saw them doing that, I thought, 'Wow! I never thought of this, but this is just an extension of what I'm doing. It looks like it'd be more fun,'" Bean told a NASA interviewer in 1998.

After his astronaut selection, but before his assignment to Apollo 12, Bean served alongside Clifton "CC" Williams on the backup crew for the Gemini 10 mission in 1966 and the support crew for Conrad's and Gordon's Gemini 11 mission later that year. Bean was then relegated to the Apollo Applications Program, a development effort that would eventually produce the Skylab space station.

"I wanted to go to Apollo. Everybody did, but I wasn't fitting in," Bean admitted. "So I got shuffled over there, and I then didn't learn that much either, other than I was out in left field and I just had to accept it and had to make the best of it."

Then tragedy struck. Williams, who was assigned to fly with Conrad and Gordon to the moon, was killed in a jet crash on Oct. 5, 1967.

In the wake of the accident, Conrad personally requested that Bean fly with him as the Apollo 12 lunar module pilot.

After flying to the moon and living on board Skylab, Bean served as the backup to the commander of the U.S. side of the 1975 Apollo-Soyuz Test Project jointly flown with the Soviet Union.

That's how it felt to walk on the moon

In October 1975, Bean retired from the Navy with the rank of Captain but stayed at NASA through June 1981, leading the astronaut candidate operations and training group as the first of the space shuttle astronauts were recruited in 1978 and 1980. Bean also served as acting chief of the Astronaut Office while John Young was off training for STS-1, the first launch of the shuttle program.

Around that time, Bean began considering what he would do next.

"Was I going to fly the shuttle?," he asked himself. "I was doing all the things you do to be a shuttle commander. I was getting as much simulator time as anybody, flying the Shuttle Training Aircraft, flying T-38 [jets] and everything like that."

"I was thinking, 'I don't know what to do.' But finally I decided that they had enough good young men and women that could fly the space shuttle as good as I could or better," he told a NASA interviewer in 1998.

An aspiring artist since he took a fine art class as a student at the Navy Test Pilot School, Bean followed the advice of a friend and decided to leave NASA and try his hand at becoming a professional painter focusing on the things he saw and felt while exploring the moon.

"I had a skill, and an experience, and I said, 'in my opinion someone needs to do this job, to record this great human adventure in fine art so that it will remain,'" he recalled. "It doesn't replace the movies, it doesn't replace the books other people write. But it was a great enough event in human history that recording it this way is something that only I am interested in doing, but it's worth doing."

Bean's approach to his paintings was to blend an eye for technical accuracy with an impressionistic use of color. His subjects included landscapes that he first-hand witnessed, the activities of his fellow Apollo astronauts and fantasy scenes based on what he thought could have or should have been possible.

Bean further set his creations apart by embedding small pieces of his moon-dust-stained mission patches in his acrylic paint and texturing his canvas using the sole of a replica lunar boot and the head of a geology hammer he used on the moon.

"Every painting that I do, I put that texture, get those moon boots and all that other texture. Then I sprinkle a little bit of the patch in there so that symbolically there's dust from the Ocean of Storms," he described.

Remembrance of a moonwalk

At the time of his death, his online collection index listed more than 160 paintings. More than 40 of those works were exhibited by the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC in 2009 in celebration of the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 and 12 moon landings.

A mural of one his paintings, "Reaching for the Stars," adorned the entrance wall to the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame in Florida from 1990 through 2015.

Bean's art was also published in two collections: "Apollo: An Eyewitness Account By Astronaut/Explorer Artist/Moonwalker" (Greenwich Workshop Press, 1998) and "Painting Apollo: First Artist on Another World" (Smithsonian Books, 2009), both of which were written with Andrew Chaikin.

For his service to his country, Bean was awarded distinguished service medals by the Navy and NASA. He shared in the Robert J. Collier Trophy in 1973 and Robert H. Goddard Memorial Trophy in 1975 as part of the Skylab team.

Bean was inducted into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame in 1997 and the National Aviation Hall of Fame in 2010.

Bean was the last living member of the Apollo 12 crew. He was preceded in death by Conrad in 1999 and Gordon in 2017. With Bean's death, only four of the twelve Apollo moonwalkers are still alive: Buzz Aldrin (Apollo 11), David Scott (Apollo 15), Charles Duke (Apollo 16) and Harrison Schmitt (Apollo 17).

He is survived by his wife Leslie, a sister Paula Stott, and two children from a prior marriage, a daughter Amy Sue and son Clay.
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Odp: Alan LaVern Bean (1932-2018)
« Odpowiedź #4 dnia: Maj 26, 2018, 20:47 »
Straszna szkoda :(

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Odp: Alan LaVern Bean (1932-2018)
« Odpowiedź #5 dnia: Maj 26, 2018, 21:00 »
Już drugiej całej załogi po Apollo 14 nie ma  wśród żywych  :(
Chronologiczna lista  zmarłych księżycowych podróżników:

08.08.1991  James Benson Irwin (61)  ( 8 )
22.07.1998  Alan Bartlett Shepard, Jr. (74) (5)
09.07.1999  Charles 'Pete' Conrad, Jr. (69) (3)
25.08.2012  Neil Alden Armstrong (82) (1)
04.02.2016  Edgar Dean Mitchell (85) (6)
16.01.2017  Eugene Andrew 'Gene' Cernan (82) (11)
05.01.2018  John Watts Young (87) (9)
26.05.2018  Alan LaVern Bean  (86) (4)

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Odp: Alan LaVern Bean (1932-2018)
« Odpowiedź #6 dnia: Maj 26, 2018, 21:03 »
http://www.americaspace.com/2018/05/26/moonwalker-skylab-commander-and-lunar-artist-alan-bean-dies-aged-86/

Cytuj
   
Moonwalker, Skylab Commander and Lunar Artist Alan Bean Dies, Aged 86
By Ben Evans

Alan Bean, the fourth man to set foot on the lunar surface—and the second Moonwalker to pass in 2018—has died, aged 86, after several days on life support after suffering a stroke. With his passing, the world has now lost eight of the 12 sons who left their bootprints in the lunar dust, with only Buzz Aldrin, Dave Scott, Charlie Duke and Harrison “Jack” Schmitt still with us. During his career, Bean became the first astronaut from his class to draw a command assignment and, after his Moon landing, went on to command America’s Skylab space station, stood in reserve for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) and acted as deputy chief of the astronaut office, before retiring to devote his life to painting. “Life is a dance,” he once said. “You learn as you go.”

Alan LaVern Bean was born in Wheeler, Texas, on 15 March 1932, with a father who worked for the Soil Conservation Service and a mother who ran her own ice cream shop. Athletically talented from a young age, Bean earned a bachelor’s degree in aeronautical engineering from the University of Texas at Austin in 1955 and entered the U.S. Navy through the Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC). He underwent initial flight instruction and was assigned to a jet attack squadron, based at Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville, Fla. He did not fit the mold of the fighter pilot: at Jacksonville, Bean was nicknamed “Sarsaparilla”, because he never touched a drop, or simply “Beano”. As a test pilot at Patuxent River, Md., he met an instructor who would change his life: a young Navy lieutenant called Charles “Pete” Conrad.

In October 1963, Bean successfully applied to join NASA’s third class of astronauts and after early training he was assigned to work on spacecraft recovery systems, before drawing his first assignment as backup command pilot for Gemini X in July 1966. In doing so, Bean became the first member of his class to draw a command position, even though it was in a backup capacity. His crewmate was a Marine Corps aviator named Clifton “C.C.” Williams, who wound up being assigned to join Conrad and another astronaut, Dick Gordon, on the mission which eventually turned out to be Apollo 12. Meanwhile, Bean came off his Gemini X backup duty to work on Apollo Applications, but the situation changed dramatically. In the fall of 1967, tragically, Williams was killed in an aircraft crash and Conrad was faced with an empty spot on his crew. He picked Bean.

As a crew, they bonded exceptionally well. They purchased matching gold Corvettes, the license plates of which were emblazoned with their Apollo 12 crew positions: Bean was “LMP”, or “Lunar Module Pilot”. The three men launched from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida, into thundery skies on 14 November 1969, just four months after Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin had performed humanity’s triumphant landing on the Moon. Apollo 12 was targeted to perform the first precision touchdown on the lunar surface, alighting on the Ocean of Storms, not far from NASA’s Surveyor 3 robotic lander. However, the launch did not go well. The Saturn V rocket was twice struck by lightning, temporarily shutting down systems aboard the spacecraft and bringing Apollo 12 dangerously close to an aborted mission.

Fortunately, Electrical, Environmental and Communications Officer (EECOM) John Aaron knew that repositioning the Signal Conditioning Equipment (SCE) switch to its auxiliary position would allow raw signals from the instrumentation to be converted into usable data for the spacecraft’s displays. In one of the most famous radio calls from Apollo 12, Aaron advised that the crew should “try SCE to Auxiliary” and it was Bean who calmly moved the switch to its new position. Immediately, data reappeared on consoles in Mission Control and the crew was able to gradually bring their fuel cells and other systems back online. Humanity’s second landing mission to the Moon was on.

Four days later, Bean hopped down the ladder of the lunar module Intrepid, to become the fourth man to set foot on an alien world. Over the next two days, he and Conrad set up experiments on the surface and landed just 525 feet (160 meters) from Surveyor 3, so close that they were able to walk over to it and retrieve samples for return to Earth. Unfortunately, Bean accidentally pointed the color television camera directly at the Sun, burning out the light-sensitive coating on its vidicon tube. He tried shaking the camera, then tapped it with his hammer, but to no avail. The first attempt to see color images of astronauts on the lunar surface had been lost.

Nevertheless, the two men pressed on with the two Moonwalks, each of which lasted four hours. Their backup crew, Dave Scott and Jim Irwin, had helpfully pasted Playboy bunnies into their cuff checklists, which caused laughter every now and then, affording some levity as they set up the U.S. flag, a package of surface experiments and set to work performing the first detailed geological inspection of their surroundings. They managed to sneak a timer aboard Apollo 12, intending to take a photograph of them both, but unfortunately it got lost in their tool carrier and gradually covered in lunar grime. With no time to dig through the dirt to find it, they gave it up as lost.

Ironically, back at Intrepid at the end of their second Moonwalk, they found the timer…and hurled it as far as they could into the distance.

Lunar grime was on Dick Gordon’s mind when Conrad and Bean rejoined him in orbit a day later. The two Moonwalkers were filthy and, fearful of the impact of the abrasive dust on the spacecraft systems, he insisted that they strip naked before coming aboard. If something bad happened at that moment, they mused, and someone found them centuries later, what would they think?

“That’s I’m a sick and lonely man,” deadpanned Gordon.

After Apollo 12, Bean transferred back to Apollo Applications, which by now had been renamed “Skylab” and sought to place America’s first space station into low-Earth orbit. On 28 July 1973, he commanded a crew of scientist Dr. Owen Garriott and pilot Jack Lousma on a record-breaking 59-day mission to Skylab. Theirs was to be a voyage of around 60 scientific experiments—featuring almost 800 living creatures, including, famously, a pair of common cross spiders, named Anita and Arabella—and Garriott would later pay tribute to Bean’s tenacity, attention to detail and unflinching focus on the completion of their mission. And that mission did not begin well. Only hours after launch, the crew was alerted to a propellant leak in one of their command module’s four thruster quads.

But the situation worsened dramatically in the next few days, as the astronauts fell victim to space sickness. Just as they were beginning to feel better, a problem with another set of the command module’s quad thrusters was detected. With two of the four quads out of action, part of their spacecraft’s essential maneuvering capability was seriously depleted. NASA, aware that another failure would place Bean, Garriott and Lousma in severe distress, opted to call up a two-man Skylab rescue crew and have their vehicle ready to launch, if needed. As circumstances transpired, the Skylab Rescue flight did not come to pass and the 59-day mission proceeded. Three spacewalks were performed, one by Bean himself. By the end of his second mission, he had logged over ten hours outside a spacecraft, either on the lunar surface or in low-Earth orbit. At the instant of splashdown on 25 September 1973, with 69 days in space across his two missions, Bean secured a new record as the most experienced space traveler in history.

Following Skylab, Bean trained as the backup commander for the U.S. side of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) in July 1975 and went on to serve as deputy chief of the astronaut office, until shortly before his retirement from NASA in February 1981. From an early age, he had been fascinated by painting and had taken night classes in oils whilst at NAS Jacksonville. After NASA, Bean famously devoted himself to conveying the story of his lunar adventures on canvas, adding unique finishing touches to his paintings: a smear of real Moon dust, perhaps, or a print made by a real lunar shoe. In his own words, he described himself as “an artist, creating paintings that record for future generations mankind’s first exploration of another world.”

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Odp: Alan LaVern Bean (1932-2018)
« Odpowiedź #7 dnia: Maj 26, 2018, 21:04 »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZkTyEe7DfY" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZkTyEe7DfY</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZkTyEe7DfY

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Odp: Alan LaVern Bean (1932-2018)
« Odpowiedź #8 dnia: Maj 26, 2018, 21:38 »
Już tylko czterech z dwunastu księżycowych spacerowiczów żyje:

z Apollo 11: Buzz Aldrin (2) lat 88:



z Apollo 15: David Scott (7) lat 85:



z Apollo 16: Charles Duke (10) lat 82:



z Apollo 17: Harrison Schmitt (12) lat 82:

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Odp: Alan LaVern Bean (1932-2018)
« Odpowiedź #9 dnia: Maj 26, 2018, 23:17 »
Alan Bean 2010 Hall of Fame Induction

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZChMeYtTl_Y" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZChMeYtTl_Y</a>
Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZChMeYtTl_Y

Interview with NASA Artist/Astronaut Alan Bean with Johnny Alonso on NASA 360

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhJDJYtkv48" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhJDJYtkv48</a>
Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhJDJYtkv48

Captain Al Bean Interview Part 1

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1E5nQMK-TUg" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1E5nQMK-TUg</a>
Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1E5nQMK-TUg

Captain Al Bean Interview Part 2

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbVqAvx9KXA" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbVqAvx9KXA</a>
Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbVqAvx9KXA

Alan Bean - Moonwalker and Space Artist

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6ATrJPNSvQ" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6ATrJPNSvQ</a>
Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6ATrJPNSvQ

Alan Bean Talks Skylab 3

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfxAoP5o7kg" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfxAoP5o7kg</a>
Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfxAoP5o7kg

Apollo 12 astronaut Alan Bean interview

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1bbPzX-dfV4" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1bbPzX-dfV4</a>
Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1bbPzX-dfV4

Offline Orionid

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Odp: Alan LaVern Bean (1932-2018)
« Odpowiedź #10 dnia: Maj 26, 2018, 23:18 »
Jeszcze niedawno 4. spacerowiczów nie żyło, a teraz tylko 4. żyje.
4-ty człowiek na Księżycu o imieniu i nazwisku na 4. litery.
4. oddziaływania podstawowe we Wszechświecie.
Sztuka i Kosmos -  Jego malarstwo uwzniośliło księżycowe dokonania ludzkości.
Miejmy nadzieję , że dzięki jego artystycznym utworom trudniej będzie porzucić  ludzkości księżycowe  marzenia.
A w  przyszłym księżycowym muzeum nie powinno zabraknąć reprodukcji  obrazów Zmarłego , a może też i oryginałów.


Offline kanarkusmaximus

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Odp: Alan LaVern Bean (1932-2018)
« Odpowiedź #11 dnia: Maj 26, 2018, 23:31 »
Bardzo smutna wiadomość!

Offline Orionid

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Odp: Alan LaVern Bean (1932-2018)
« Odpowiedź #12 dnia: Maj 26, 2018, 23:43 »
Piosenka o Alanie

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWOIhq3jnac" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWOIhq3jnac</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWOIhq3jnac


Offline Orionid

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Odp: Alan LaVern Bean (1932-2018)
« Odpowiedź #13 dnia: Maj 28, 2018, 09:39 »
Z 24 uczestników lotów księżycowych programu Apollo żyje jeszcze połowa.
Połowa astronautów tej kategorii spacerowała po Księżycu.

Apollo 8                 Frank Frederick Borman II 1928
Apollo 8 , Apollo 13 James Arthur 'Shaky' Lovell, Jr. 1928
Apollo 8                  William Alison Anders  1933
Apollo 10                Thomas Patten Stafford 1930
Apollo 11                Michael Collins 1930
Apollo 11                Buzz Aldrin 2. człowiek  na Księżycu 1930
Apollo 13                Fred Wallace Haise, Jr. 1933
Apollo 15                David Randolph Scott 7. człowiek  na Księżycu 1932
Apollo 15                Alfred Merrill Worden 1932
Apollo 16                Charles Moss Duke, Jr. 10. człowiek na Księżycu 1935
Apollo 16                Thomas Kenneth 'Ken' Mattingly II 1936
Apollo 17                Harrison Hagan 'Jack' Schmitt  12. człowiek na Księżycu 1935

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Odp: Alan LaVern Bean (1932-2018)
« Odpowiedź #14 dnia: Maj 28, 2018, 17:56 »
https://twitter.com/AstroKarenN/status/1000463883683840002

Cytuj
Karen L. Nyberg @AstroKarenN 12:49 - 26 maj 2018
As a girl who grew up with passions for spaceflight and art, Alan Bean was my hero. A kind, gracious and humble man, he was a true role model and inspiration.  I am heartbroken to hear of his passing.  RIP Alan Bean.