Autor Wątek: Owen Kay Garriott (1930-2019)  (Przeczytany 455 razy)

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Owen Kay Garriott (1930-2019)
« dnia: Kwiecień 15, 2019, 21:53 »
Właśnie ukazało się doniesienie o śmierci byłego amerykańskiego astronauty Owena Garriotta, w wieku 88 lat.

https://twitter.com/ASE_Astronauts/status/1117866891878420481

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We've just received word from the family who asked us to pass along the sad news that Skylab and Shuttle astronaut Owen Garriott has passed away at his home in Huntsville. Our deepest condolences to Eve, @RichardGarriott and the whole family on his loss. He will be sorely missed.



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Odp: Owen Kay Garriott (1930-2019)
« Odpowiedź #1 dnia: Kwiecień 16, 2019, 07:29 »
Z 9. uczestników lotów na stację Skylab po 45 latach od powrotu ostatniej załogi nie żyje już ponad połowa :

Charles Conrad, Jr.
Paul Weitz

Alan Bean
Owen Garriott

William Pogue

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« Odpowiedź #2 dnia: Kwiecień 16, 2019, 07:30 »
Owen Garriott, Skylab and space shuttle astronaut, dies at 88


Skylab 3 science pilot Owen Garriott is seen stationed at the Apollo Telescope Mount console aboard the Skylab space station. (NASA)

April 15, 2019 — Owen Garriott, a Skylab and space shuttle astronaut who was the first to use amateur radio from orbit, has died at the age of 88.

Garriott's death on Monday (April 15) was reported by the Association of Space Explorers (ASE), an organization of international astronauts and cosmonauts that included Garriott as a distinguished member.

"We've just received word from the family who asked us to pass along the sad news that Skylab and shuttle astronaut Owen Garriott has passed away at his home in Huntsville [Alabama]," the ASE posted to Twitter on Monday. "He will be sorely missed."

NASA also recognized Garriott's death in a statement released Monday afternoon.

"The astronauts, scientists and engineers at Johnson Space Center are saddened by the loss of Owen Garriott," said chief astronaut Patrick Forrester. "We remember the history he made during the Skylab and space shuttle programs that helped shape the space program we have today. Not only was he a bright scientist and astronaut, he and his crewmates set the stage for international cooperation in human spaceflight."

A member of NASA's first group of scientist-astronauts selected in 1965, Garriott flew twice into space, logging a total of 69 days, 18 hours and 56 minutes off the planet.

Garriott launched on his first spaceflight as the science pilot on the second crewed mission to Skylab, the United States' first space station. Lifting off on July 28, 1973, atop a Saturn IB rocket with Alan Bean and Jack Lousma, Garriott and his two crewmates spent a then-record setting 59 days on board the orbital workshop conducting science experiments.


Scientist-astronaut Owen Garriott reconstitutes a container of food at the Skylab crew quarters ward room table in 1973. (NASA)

"We could see the Sun in ways that simply were not possible before, for long periods, [at] ultraviolet and X-ray wavelengths, and look at the corona, look at the mass ejections throwing material far out into the corona," said Garriott, referring to his and his crewmates' solar observations, in a 2000 NASA oral history. "Some of that [data] is actually still being used for research purposes today for comparisons with some of the more modern satellites, which can do things even better than we did."

Garriott and his Skylab 3 (or Skylab II, depending on the chosen nomenclature) crewmates were also the subjects of physiological studies and biomedical monitoring to learn how the human body reacts to long durations in microgravity.


Owen Garriott performs the first of three spacewalks outside of the Skylab orbital workshop on Aug. 6, 1973. (NASA)

"We learned the importance of exercise," explained Garriott. "If you have the appropriate amount of exercise, namely one to two hours a day, then you're going to come back in essentially as good a condition as when you left."

Garriott also performed three spacewalks — two with Lousma and one with Bean — spending nearly 14 hours outside of Skylab to swap out film cartridges, retrieve experiments and, on his first extravehicular activity (EVA), to deploy a large solar shield to help compensate for damage that the space station had sustained during its launch.


Skylab 3 astronaut Owen Garriott retrieves an imagery experiment from the Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount in August 1973. (NASA)

"The twin poles sunshade was important to bring the temperatures down to a more permanent 70, 75, 80-degree [Fahrenheit, or 21 to 26 degree Celsius] level," he described.

In addition, Garriott had the unexpected opportunity to test fly a prototype jetpack inside of Skylab. Only Bean and Lousma were trained for the Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU), a predecessor to the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) later used on the space shuttle, but following the planned tests being completed, Garriott was given the chance to try it as a novice.

"I remember Alan saying, 'Okay, Owen, you're on your way,' [and he] just turned it loose," recalled Garriott. "It [was] surprisingly intuitive. With just a modest amount of training in how to fly a spacecraft with a translation and attitude control thruster, you could fly around ... making turns all the way around."

Garriott, Bean and Lousma splashed down aboard their Apollo command module on Sept. 25, 1973.

Garriott returned to space a decade later, launching on Nov. 28, 1983, on board the space shuttle Columbia as a mission specialist on the STS-9 crew. The 10-day flight marked the first use of the European Spacelab laboratory module.


STS-9 mission specialist Owen Garriott uses a ham radio on space shuttle Columbia to contact radio operators on Earth. (NASA)

"The whole mission was oriented towards making clear that the Spacelab, the laboratory that fit in the payload bay of the shuttle, was useful for the whole range of scientific disciplines," Garriott told NASA. "So not only a lot of biomedical work, but also astronomy, fluid physics, materials processing, atmospheric sciences, all were represented with differing experiments."

Between his mission tasks, Garriott also had time to set another first, drawing on a license he obtained when he was a teenager.


STS-9 mission specialist Owen Garriott works aboard Spacelab-1 in the payload bay of space shuttle Columbia. (NASA)

"It was my good fortune to take the first amateur radio into space," said Garriott. "In my spare time only, I managed to hold up an antenna to the window and to talk to amateurs on Earth."

About 250 ham radio operators were able to connect with "W5LFL" — Garriott's call sign — becoming the first people to talk with an astronaut in orbit without the conversation being routed through NASA's flight control loops.

"When in orbit over land, I could make a CQ, which is a general call, and see who responded," Garriott said. "Among others, I was able to speak with the amateur radio club in my hometown of Enid, Oklahoma, with my mom, with Senator [Barry] Goldwater, and with King Hussein [of Jordan], who was an avid ham."

Owen Kay Garriott was born in Enid on Nov. 22, 1930. He received his Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering from the University of Oklahoma in 1953 and a Master of Science and Doctorate in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1957 and 1960.

From 1953 to 1956, Garriott served as an electronics officer while on active duty with the U.S. Navy. He then taught electronics, electromagnetic theory and ionospheric physics as an associate professor at Stanford until he was selected by NASA for its fourth group of astronauts.

Prior to flying on Skylab 3, Garriott served as a capsule communicator, or capcom, in Mission Control for the Apollo 11 first moon landing mission in July 1969.

"I was on the capcom's position while they [Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin] were all sleeping for the first night on the moon. So, not a lot of work on that one, but you have to be ready, of course," said Garriott. "You have to be prepared to handle almost any emergency that might come along. So you learned a lot in that role."

"I hope I was of value to the Apollo 11 team in the conduct of the flight. I'm sure it was of value to me in preparation for the Skylab program," he said.

After his space shuttle mission, Garriott served as a program scientist in NASA's space station project office, working with the scientific communities and advising the program's management on the early design of a new space station.

Garriott left NASA in 1986 in the wake of the space shuttle Challenger tragedy, when it became clear to him that he would not have another opportunity to fly into space.

"If I'd have had a chance to fly in late '86 or '87, then I wanted to stay for another opportunity. But when that was clearly going to be delayed five years, I just decided that from a personal perspective it'd be better to leave that to somebody else," he said.

From 1988 to 1993, Garriott served as the vice president of space programs at Teledyne Brown Engineering, which supported payload integration for the Spacelab missions and had a role in developing the U.S. lab for the International Space Station. In 1995, Garriott and his first wife founded Leonardo's Discovery Warehouse, a children's edutainment center in Enid.

Later, Garriott joined the Laboratory for Structural Biology at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, where he participated in research involving microbes that he returned from extreme environments such as deep sea hydrothermal vents.

Twenty-five years after his second and last spaceflight, Garriott supported another history-making mission — this time by his son, Richard. The elder Garriott helped design and organize the commercial science experiments that accompanied his son on an October 2008 self-funded flight to the International Space Station. The two were also able to connect via ham radio.


Owen Garriott (left) with his son, Richard, talks to the media prior to Richard's launch to the International Space Station in 2008. (NASA)

For his service to the space program, Owen Garriott was awarded the NASA Distinguished Service Medal, the Robert J. Collier Trophy and Robert H. Goddard Memorial Trophy (the latter two shared with his fellow Skylab crew members), among numerous other honors. He was inducted into the Oklahoma Aviation and Space Hall of Fame in 1980 and the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame in 1997.

Garriott wrote about the first U.S. space station with co-authors Joe Kerwin and David Hitt in "Homesteading Space: The Skylab Story," published in 2008 by the University of Nebraska Press.

Garriott was preceded in death by his first wife, Helen Mary Walker, with whom he had four children, Randall, Robert, Richard and Linda. He is survived by his wife, Eve Long Garriott.

http://www.collectspace.com//news/news-041519a-astronaut-owen-garriott-obituary.html

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Odp: Owen Kay Garriott (1930-2019)
« Odpowiedź #3 dnia: Kwiecień 16, 2019, 07:41 »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQwkpNPDMEg" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQwkpNPDMEg</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQwkpNPDMEg

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UlBzUcuFUjY" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UlBzUcuFUjY</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UlBzUcuFUjY

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ckAftDM5ecg" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ckAftDM5ecg</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ckAftDM5ecg

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Odp: Owen Kay Garriott (1930-2019)
« Odpowiedź #4 dnia: Kwiecień 16, 2019, 07:50 »
Skylab and Space Shuttle Astronaut Owen Garriott Dies at 88
April 16, 2019


Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, science pilot of the Skylab 3 mission, is stationed at the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) console in the Multiple Docking Adapter of the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. From this console the astronauts actively control the ATM solar physics telescope. (sl3-108-1288) Credits: NASA

Former astronaut and long-duration spaceflight pioneer Owen Garriott, 88, died today, April 15, at his home in Huntsville, Alabama. Garriott flew aboard the Skylab space station during the Skylab 3 mission and on the Space Shuttle Columbia for the STS-9/Spacelab-1 mission. He spent a total of 70 days in space.

“The astronauts, scientists and engineers at Johnson Space Center are saddened by the loss of Owen Garriott,” said Chief Astronaut Pat Forrester. “We remember the history he made during the Skylab and space shuttle programs that helped shape the space program we have today. Not only was he a bright scientist and astronaut, he and his crewmates set the stage for international cooperation in human spaceflight. He also was the first to participate in amateur radio from space, a hobby many of our astronauts still enjoy today.”


Hall of Fame astronaut Owen Garriott thanks the audience for their applause at the 2011 U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame induction ceremony at NASA's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Credits: NASA/Jim Grossmann

Garriott was born in Enid, Oklahoma. He earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the University of Oklahoma, and master’s and doctoral degrees in electrical engineering from Stanford University, Palo Alto, California. Garriott served as an electronics officer while on active duty with the U.S. Navy from 1953 to 1956, and was stationed aboard several U.S. destroyers at sea. He then taught electronics, electromagnetic theory and ionospheric physics as an associate professor at Stanford. He performed research in ionospheric physics and has authored or co-authored more than 40 scientific papers and one book on this subject.

He was selected as a scientist-astronaut by NASA in June 1965, and then completed a 53-week course in flight training at Williams Air Force Base, Arizona. He logged more than 5,000 hours flying time -- including more than 2,900 hours in jet and light aircraft, spacecraft and helicopters. In addition to NASA ratings, he held FAA commercial pilot and flight instructor certification for instrument and multi-engine aircraft.

Garriott was the science-pilot for Skylab 3, the second crewed Skylab mission, and was in orbit from July 28 to Sept. 25, 1973. His crewmates were Commander Alan Bean and Pilot Jack Lousma. The crew accomplished 150% of mission goals while completing 858 revolutions of the Earth and traveling some 24.5 million miles. The crew installed replacement rate gyros used for attitude control of the spacecraft and a twin pole sunshade used for thermal control, and repaired nine major experiment or operational equipment items. They devoted 305 hours to extensive solar observations and completed 333 medical experiment performances to obtain valuable data on the effects of extended weightlessness on humans. The crew of Skylab 3 logged 1,427 hours and 9 minutes each in space, setting a world record for a single mission, and Garriott spent 13 hours and 43 minutes in three separate spacewalks outside the orbital workshop.


Scientist-astronaut Owen K. Garriott, Skylab 3 science pilot, participates in the Aug. 6, 1973 extravehicular activity during which he and astronaut Jack Lousma, Skylab 3 pilot, deployed the twin pole solar shield to help shade the Orbital Workshop. Credits: NASA

On his second and final flight, Garriott flew as a mission specialist on the ninth space shuttle mission and the first six-person flight. He launched aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia for STS-9/Spacelab-1 from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on Nov. 28, 1983. His crewmates were Commander John Young, Pilot Brewster Shaw, Jr., fellow mission specialist Robert Parker, and Payload Specialists Byron Lichtenberg and Ulf Merbold of (ESA) European Space Agency. This six-person crew was the largest yet to fly aboard a single spacecraft, the first international shuttle crew and the first to carry payload specialists. During STS-9, the first human amateur radio operations in space were conducted using Garriott's station call, W5LFL. After 10 days of Spacelab hardware verification and around-the-clock scientific operations, Columbia and its laboratory cargo landed on the dry lakebed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on Dec. 8, 1983.

Garriott held other positions at Johnson Space Center such as deputy and later director of Science and Applications, and as the assistant director for Space and Life Science.

For Garriott’s official NASA biography, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/garriott_owen.pdf

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/skylab-and-space-shuttle-astronaut-owen-garriott-dies-at-88

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Odp: Owen Kay Garriott (1930-2019)
« Odpowiedź #5 dnia: Kwiecień 20, 2019, 21:50 »
Owen Garriott (1930 – 2019)
BY KRZYSZTOF KANAWKA ON 20 KWIETNIA 2019


Owen Garriott podczas spaceru kosmicznego w trakcie misji Skylab-3 / Credits - NASA

Piętnastego kwietnia zmarł amerykański astronauta Owen Garriott, uczestnik dwóch misji kosmicznych.

Owen Garriott urodził się 22 listopada 1930 roku. W 1965 roku został wybrany przez NASA jako jeden z sześciu astronautów-naukowców (grupa 4).

Do swojej pierwszej misji – o oznaczeniu Skylab 3 – Owen Garriott wystartował 28 lipca 1973 roku. Przez następne 59 dni Owen Garriott oraz Alan Bean i Jack Lousma przebywali na pokładzie stacji Skylab, realizując dużą ilość badań naukowych, w tym związanych z adaptacją człowieka do warunków mikrograwitacji. W trakcie tej misji Owen Garriott wykonał trzy spacery kosmiczne. Także w trakcie tej misji Garriott wykonał pewien żart: wykorzystał nagrany wcześniej głos swojej żony podczas sesji komunikacyjnej z kontrolą misji.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QRZ0kNEnAfA" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QRZ0kNEnAfA</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QRZ0kNEnAfA

Podsumowanie misji Skylab-3 / Credits – NASA, PeriscopeFilm

Dziesięć lat później, 28 listopada 1983 roku, Owen Garriott wystartował na pokładzie promu Columbia do misji STS-9. Był to pierwszy lot modułu Spacelab. Misja trwała 10 dni i 6 godzin.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BaATwXGiX_0" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BaATwXGiX_0</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BaATwXGiX_0

Podsumowanie misji STS-9 / Credits – NASA

Owen Garriott opuścił NASA w 1986 roku. Przez lata zajmował różne stanowiska oraz uczestniczył w kilku ekspedycjach o charakterze naukowym – m.in. poszukiwanie meteorytów na Antarktydzie oraz badania organizmów na dnach oceanów. Owen Garriott zmarł 15 kwietnia 2019 roku.

Jego syn, Richard Garriott odbył lot na orbitę (jako “turysta kosmiczny”) w październiku 2008 roku na pokładzie Sojuza TMA-13. Do dziś Richard Garriott, Rosjanin Sergiej Wołkow (syn Aleksandra Wołkowa) oraz Rosjanin Roman Romanienko (syn Jurija Romanienki) to jedyni astronauci/kosmonauci “drugiej generacji” – czyli osoby, których rodzice także przebywali w kosmosie.

(PFA, NASA)
https://kosmonauta.net/2019/04/owen-garriot-1930-2019/#prettyPhoto

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Odp: Owen Kay Garriott (1930-2019)
« Odpowiedź #6 dnia: Kwiecień 20, 2019, 22:07 »
Remembering Astronaut Owen Garriott
Apr 18, 2019 10:00 AM
U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame

(...) A special ceremony will be held at 10 AM on Thursday, April 18 to honor his life and legacy in the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame® located inside the Heroes & Legends attraction.

He was born on November 22, 1930 in Enid, Oklahoma. NASA selected Garriott in 1965 as one of the first six scientist-astronauts. A veteran of two spaceflights, he logged a total of 70 days in space.

Garriott’s first mission was Skylab 3 as a science-pilot. He and his crewmates spent 60 days aboard America’s first space station, setting a new record at that time. During the mission, Garriott performed three separate spacewalks totaling more than 13 hours.

His second and final mission was STS-9 Columbia, Spacelab-1. During the flight, Garriott operated the first Amateur Radio Station (ham radio) from space. This led to more frequent use, including schools communicating with astronauts in low-Earth orbit.

Garriott was an accomplished scholar earning his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Oklahoma in 1953. He then attended Stanford University, where he earned an M.S. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in the late 1950s. Later, he completed a flight training course to become a pilot, and logged more than 5,000 hours of flying time. Before NASA, he taught at Stanford University and performed research in ionospheric physics, authoring more than 40 scientific papers on the topic. Garriott held many more positions, including director of Science and Applications at the Johnson Space Center.

In his free time, Garriott supported charitable activities, co-founding the Enid Arts and Sciences Foundation. He has received several honors, including being inducted into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame® in 1997. (...)
https://kennedyspacecenter.com/launches-and-events/events-calendar/2019/april/remembering-owen-garriott

REMEMBERING ASTRONAUT OWEN GARRIOTT
PUBLISHED ON APRIL 17, 2019  by Alaina

(...) The visitor complex previously had the opportunity to sit down with Garriott for “Tell Me a Story,” our ongoing interview series with astronauts. During this particular story, Garriott recalls a fun “gotcha” moment he had with some of the ground control team during his Skylab 3 mission.

Enjoy hearing of this prank he pulled, but didn’t explain how he did it until 20 years later!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6XRuEvxWjEk" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6XRuEvxWjEk</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6XRuEvxWjEk

(...)
https://www.kennedyspacecenter.com/blog/remembering-astronaut-owen-garriott
« Ostatnia zmiana: Kwiecień 20, 2019, 22:10 wysłana przez Orionid »

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Odp: Owen Kay Garriott (1930-2019)
« Odpowiedź #7 dnia: Kwiecień 20, 2019, 22:27 »
Owen Garriott, astronaut on Skylab, Columbia, dies at 88
By Staff Reports and News Services April 16

Owen Garriott, an astronaut who flew on the first U.S. space station, Skylab, and whose son followed him into orbit, died April 15 at his home in Huntsville, Ala. He was 88.

His death was announced by NASA. The cause was not disclosed.

Dr. Garriott served on the second Skylab crew in 1973, spending close to 60 days in space, a record at the time. He also was part of the ninth space shuttle mission, flying aboard Columbia in 1983 and operating a ham radio from orbit for the first time.

In 2008, Dr. Garriott traveled to Kazakhstan for his son’s launch into space aboard a Russian Soyuz rocket. Richard Garriott is a computer-game developer who paid the Russians $30 million for a ride to the International Space Station.

They were the first U.S. father-and-son space travelers. Two generations of Russians had previously flown in space.

“Our adult bonding around the experience of space was a rare treasure we shared,” Richard Garriott said Tuesday via Twitter.

“In 50 years, from my father’s Apollo era to our new commercial era, much has been accomplished,” he tweeted. “Yet, none without the risks undertaken by those early pioneers!”

Owen Garriott was born Nov. 22, 1930, in Enid, Okla. He graduated from the University of Oklahoma in 1953, and then served in the Navy. He received master’s and doctoral degrees in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1957 and 1960 and taught at Stanford before being selected as an astronaut in 1965. He was among the first six scientist-astronauts picked by NASA.

Dr. Garriott later held other positions within NASA, including director of science and applications at Johnson Space Center in Houston. He left NASA in 1986 and later contributed to books about Skylab and physics.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/owen-garriott-astronaut-on-skylab-space-shuttle-dies-at-88/2019/04/16/a32a4f4a-6066-11e9-9ff2-abc984dc9eec_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.39aabcf121f8

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« Odpowiedź #8 dnia: Kwiecień 20, 2019, 22:42 »
Scott Kelly@StationCDRKelly 15 kwi 2019
Saddened to learn the passing of former Astronaut Owen Garriott who pioneered long-duration spaceflight aboard #Skylab. My thoughts are with @RichardGarriott and family. #RIP
https://twitter.com/StationCDRKelly/status/1117905374718201856

Buzz Aldrin@TheRealBuzz 15 kwi 2019
Astronaut Owen Garriott was a good friend and an incredible astronaut. I have a great sadness as I learn of his passing today. Godspeed Owen.
https://twitter.com/TheRealBuzz/status/1117875297334910977

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« Odpowiedź #9 dnia: Kwiecień 23, 2019, 18:06 »
Amateur Radio in Space Pioneer Astronaut Owen Garriott, W5LFL, SK
04/15/2019

The US astronaut who pioneered the use of Amateur Radio to make contacts from space — Owen K. Garriott, W5LFL — died April 15 at his home in Huntsville, Alabama. He was 88. Garriott’s ham radio activity ushered in the formal establishment of Amateur Radio in space, first as SAREX — the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment, and later as ARISS — Amateur Radio on the International Space Station.

“Owen Garriott was a good friend and an incredible astronaut,” fellow astronaut Buzz Aldrin tweeted. “I have a great sadness as I learn of his passing today. Godspeed Owen.”

An Oklahoma native, Garriott — an electrical engineer — spent 2 months aboard the Skylab space station in 1973 and 10 days aboard Spacelab-1 during a 1983 Space Shuttle Columbia mission. It was during the latter mission that Garriott thrilled radio amateurs around the world by making the first contacts from space. Thousands of hams listened on 2-meter FM, hoping to hear him or to make a contact. Garriott ended up working stations around the globe, among them such notables as the late King Hussein, JY1, of Jordan, and the late US Senator Barry Goldwater, K7UGA. He also made the first CW contact from space. Garriott called hamming from space “a pleasant pastime.”

“I managed to do it in my off-duty hours, and it was a pleasure to get involved in it and to talk with people who are as interested in space as the 100,000 hams on the ground seemed to be,” he said in an interview published in the February 1984 edition of QST. “So, it was just a pleasant experience, the hamming in particular, all the way around.”

Although Garriott had planned to operate on ham radio during his 10 days in space, no special provisions were made on board the spacecraft in terms of equipment — unlike the situation today on the International Space Station. Garriott simply used a hand-held transceiver with its antenna in the window of Spacelab-1. His first pass was down the US West Coast.

“[A]s I approached the US, I began to hear stations that were trying to reach me,” he told QST. “On my very first CQ, there were plenty of stations responding.” His first contact was with Lance Collister, WA1JXN, in Montana.

ARISS ARRL Representative Rosalie White, K1STO, met Garriott when he attended Hamvention, “both times, sitting next to him at Hamvention dinner banquets,” she recounted. “Once when he was a Special Achievement Award winner, and once with him and [his son] Richard when Richard won the 2009 Special Achievement Award. Owen was unassuming, very smart, kind, and up to date on the latest technology.” Garriott shared a Hamvention Special Achievement Award in 2002 with fellow Amateur Radio astronaut Tony England, W0ORE.

Richard Garriott, W5KWQ, was a private space traveler to the ISS, flown there by the Russian Federal Space Agency, and he also carried ham radio into space.

http://www.arrl.org/news/amateur-radio-in-space-pioneer-astronaut-owen-garriott-w5lfl-sk

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« Odpowiedź #10 dnia: Kwiecień 26, 2019, 20:52 »
Kennedy Honors Astronaut Owen Garriott
Danielle Sempsrott Posted on April 22, 2019


In the Heroes and Legends exhibit at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida, a memorial wreath was placed following a ceremony honoring the memory of former astronaut Owen Garriott. The ceremony was held April 18, 2019. Garriott flew aboard the Skylab space station during the Skylab 3 mission and also on space shuttle Columbia for the STS-9/Spacelab-1 mission. He passed away April 15 at the age of 88. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

NASA astronaut Owen Garriott, a veteran of two spaceflights, was remembered by Kennedy Space Center officials and employees during a ceremony at the Florida spaceport’s visitor complex on April 18, 2019. Following the ceremony, a memorial wreath was placed in the Heroes and Legends exhibit within the Astronaut Hall of Fame. Garriott passed away on April 15, 2019, at the age of 88.

Speakers at the ceremony included Center Director Bob Cabana and Therrin Protze, chief operating officer at the Kennedy visitor complex. Also sharing a few words was former NASA astronaut Jon McBride. (...)

https://blogs.nasa.gov/kennedy/2019/04/22/kennedy-honors-astronaut-owen-garriott/