Autor Wątek: Apollo 12 - rendez-vous na Księżycu  (Przeczytany 9399 razy)

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Offline BRANCEK1

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Odp: Apollo 12 - rendez-vous na Księżycu
« Odpowiedź #15 dnia: Styczeń 15, 2012, 16:36 »
USS Joseph Strauss
« Ostatnia zmiana: Styczeń 19, 2012, 16:40 wysłana przez Radek68 »

Offline BRANCEK1

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Odp: Apollo 12 - rendez-vous na Księżycu
« Odpowiedź #16 dnia: Styczeń 15, 2012, 16:44 »
AP-12 (Randy Stone)

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Odp: Apollo 12 - rendez-vous na Księżycu
« Odpowiedź #17 dnia: Styczeń 15, 2012, 16:45 »
AP-12 (Randy Stone)

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Odp: Apollo 12 - rendez-vous na Księżycu
« Odpowiedź #18 dnia: Styczeń 15, 2012, 16:47 »
AP-12 (Randy Stone)

Offline BRANCEK1

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Odp: Apollo 12 - rendez-vous na Księżycu
« Odpowiedź #19 dnia: Styczeń 15, 2012, 16:50 »
AP-12 (Max Hellmueller)

Zdjęcia podpisane przez Maxa i R.Stone, to są fotki z prywatnych aparatów ludzi, którzy brali udział i znajdowali się na pokładzie USS Hornet - to nie są zdjęcia NASA!

Offline BRANCEK1

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Odp: Apollo 12 - rendez-vous na Księżycu
« Odpowiedź #20 dnia: Styczeń 15, 2012, 16:54 »
AP-12 USS  Joseph Strauss  -- podpisana koperta przez kapitana jednostki ( John E. Arnold) podczas akcji ratunkowej AP-12

Offline Orionid

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Odp: Apollo 12 - rendez-vous na Księżycu
« Odpowiedź #21 dnia: Listopad 08, 2017, 06:27 »
Po odejściu Richarda  Gordona, Jr. z załogi Apollo 12 żyje już tylko Alan Bean


“The Fantasy,” a painting by Alan Bean. From left, Mr. Conrad, Mr. Gordon and Mr. Bean. Credit Alan Bean

Offline Orionid

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Odp: Apollo 12 - rendez-vous na Księżycu
« Odpowiedź #22 dnia: Listopad 09, 2017, 08:24 »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I3fXvFSdpnA" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I3fXvFSdpnA</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I3fXvFSdpnA

Offline Orionid

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Odp: Apollo 12 - rendez-vous na Księżycu
« Odpowiedź #23 dnia: Maj 26, 2018, 21:57 »
26 maja 2018  odszedł ostatni astronauta Apollo 12 Alan Bean

Alan Bean, astronaut and artist
May 24, 2018



NASA Apollo 12 Astronaut and artist Alan Bean gives remarks at the opening of the exhibit "Alan Bean: Painting Apollo, First Artist on Another World" at the National Air and Space Museum, on July 20, 2009 in Washington. The show opening coincided with the 40th anniversary celebration of Apollo. After retiring from NASA, Bean devoted his time to painting.

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/alan-bean-astronaut-and-artist

Offline mss

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Odp: Apollo 12 - rendez-vous na Księżycu
« Odpowiedź #24 dnia: Maj 26, 2018, 22:19 »
Jeszcze jeden interesujący film o misji Apollo-12:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FBhIDjWaByg" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FBhIDjWaByg</a>

Link do materiału: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FBhIDjWaByg
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Offline mss

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Odp: Apollo 12 - rendez-vous na Księżycu
« Odpowiedź #25 dnia: Maj 26, 2018, 22:21 »
Galeria 121 fotografii z tej misji:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasa2explore/albums/72157634762356711

Miłego wspominania ;-)
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Offline Orionid

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Odp: Apollo 12 - rendez-vous na Księżycu
« Odpowiedź #26 dnia: Listopad 03, 2019, 21:59 »
50 Years Ago: NASA Names Apollo 12 Crew
April 10, 2019

On April 10, 1969, NASA formally announced the crew for Apollo 12, the sixth crewed Apollo mission. If all went well on the flights preceding it, Apollo 12 would make the second human lunar landing about four months after the initial landing. The astronauts would explore a different site than the one selected for Apollo 11, and plans called for two lunar surface excursions totaling more than five hours. The crew planned to deploy the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP), a suite of science investigations, in addition to conducting the geology field work of documenting and collecting rock and soil samples for return to scientists on Earth for analysis.


Astronauts (left to right) Conrad, Gordon, and Bean pose in front of a boilerplate Apollo capsule during water egress
training when they served as the backup crew for Apollo 9.


https://www.nasa.gov/feature/50-years-ago-nasa-names-apollo-12-crew

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Odp: Apollo 12 - rendez-vous na Księżycu
« Odpowiedź #27 dnia: Listopad 03, 2019, 21:59 »
50 Years Ago: NASA Prepares for Apollo 12’s Encore Moon Landing
Aug. 16, 2019


Conrad (left) and Bean during geology training in Hawaii in August 1969.

Still basking in the afterglow from the first lunar landing, in August 1969 NASA was busy preparing for its second mission to land astronauts on the Moon, Apollo 12. If Apollo 11 had not been successful in accomplishing the first lunar landing, Apollo 12 was prepared to attempt the first landing in September 1969. There were even backup plans that if Apollo 12 wasn’t successful, Apollo 13 would try again in November. To enable these contingencies, NASA continued preparations of the Saturn V rockets and Apollo spacecraft for those missions to meet that rather challenging schedule. Once Apollo 11 accomplished the feat, Apollo 12 was pushed to November (and Apollo 13 to March 1970) and training switched to support a more expanded lunar surface program. Apollo 12 was planning to stay on the lunar surface for about 35 hours, compared to Apollo 11’s 21 hours, and conduct two surface Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) or spacewalks totaling more than 5 hours.


Left: Apollo 11 and 12 landing sites.
Right: Panorama taken by Surveyor 3 of its landing site in 1967.


On July 29, Apollo Program Director at NASA Headquarters Sam C. Phillips announced that Apollo 12 would aim for a pinpoint landing in Oceanus Procellarum (Ocean of Storms) near where the robotic spacecraft Surveyor 3 had landed in April 1967. Geologists favored this site since they were eager to have astronauts land inside a crater and Surveyor 3 had done just that, and since it was crossed by rays emanating from the bright crater Copernicus more than 200 miles away it would allow sampling of that material that might include lunar bedrock blasted out by the impact. Mapping specialists also favored it since the orbital path would allow good imaging of the Fra Mauro site that was being considered for Apollo 13. Spacecraft designers and engineers welcomed it because if the astronauts retrieved pieces of Surveyor they could analyze them for the effects of two and a half years in the harsh lunar environment. During the first of their two excursions, the astronauts would deploy the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) and collect some lunar samples, and during the second they would visit Surveyor 3 and remove some equipment for return to Earth as well as collect additional lunar samples. (...)

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/50-years-ago-nasa-prepares-for-apollo-12-s-encore-moon-landing

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Odp: Apollo 12 - rendez-vous na Księżycu
« Odpowiedź #28 dnia: Listopad 03, 2019, 22:00 »
50 Years Ago: Apollo 12 Rolls Out to Launch Pad
Sept. 13, 2019


Left: The Apollo 12 Saturn V rolling up the incline as it approaches Launch Pad 39A.
Right: Apollo 12 astronauts (left to right) Bean, Gordon, and Conrad pose in front of their Saturn V during the rollout to the pad.


(...) On Sep. 8, the Saturn V rocket with the Apollo 12 spacecraft on top rolled out from Kennedy Space Center’s (KSC) Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to Launch Pad 39A. Riding atop the Mobile Launch Platform and the Crawler Transporter, the rocket made the 3.5-mile trip to the pad in about 6 hours. Conrad, Gordon, and Bean were on hand to observe the rollout. Workers at the pad spent the next two months thoroughly checking out the rocket and spacecraft to prepare it for its mission to the Moon. The two-day Flight Readiness Test at the end of September ensured that the launch vehicle and spacecraft systems were in a state of flight readiness. Ground systems provided power to the launch vehicle during the test, but all electrical connections on the rocket itself were as if during flight.

In preparation for their mission, the Apollo 12 astronauts spent many hours in the Command Module (CM) and Lunar Module (LM) simulators at both KSC and the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), now the Johnson Space Center in Houston. In addition, Conrad and Bean as well as their backups Scott and Irwin rehearsed their lunar surface EVAs including the visit to Surveyor 3. Workers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, shipped an engineering model of the robotic spacecraft to KSC. For added realism, engineers there mounted the model on a slope to match its relative position on the interior of the crater in which it stood on the Moon.



Left: Apollo 12 astronauts Bean (left) and Conrad rehearse their EVAs at KSC.
Right: Apollo 12 Commander Conrad trains in the use of the Hasselblad camera they will use on the Moon.


With regard to lunar geology training, one advantage the Apollo 12 astronauts had over their predecessors was the ability to actually inspect Moon rocks and soil returned by the Apollo 11 crew. On Sep. 19, Conrad and Bean arrived at the Lunar Receiving Laboratory at MSC, where Lunar Sample Curator Daniel H. Anderson met them. Anderson brought a few lunar rocks and some lunar soil that scientists had already tested and didn’t require to be stored under vacuum or other special conditions, allowing Conrad and Bean to examine them closely and compare them with terrestrial rocks and soil they had seen during geology training field trips. This first hand exposure to actual lunar samples significantly augmented Conrad and Bean’s geology training. To highlight the greater emphasis being given to lunar surface science, the Apollo 12 crews (prime and backup) went on six geology field trips compared to just one for the Apollo 11 crews. (...)

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/50-years-ago-apollo-12-rolls-out-to-launch-pad

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Odp: Apollo 12 - rendez-vous na Księżycu
« Odpowiedź #29 dnia: Listopad 03, 2019, 22:03 »
50 Years Ago: Apollo 12 One Month from Launch
Oct. 16, 2019

(...) On Sept. 25, 1969, NASA appointed veteran astronaut James A. McDivitt as the Manager of the Apollo Spacecraft Program Office at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), now the Johnson Space Center in Houston. McDivitt, selected as an astronaut in 1962, commanded two spaceflights, Gemini 4 in June 1965 that included the first American spacewalk and Apollo 9 in March 1969, the first test of the Lunar Module (LM) in Earth orbit. He succeeded George M. Low who, in that position since April 1967, led the agency’s efforts to recover from the Apollo 1 fire and originated the idea to send Apollo 8 on a lunar orbital mission. Under his tenure, NASA successfully completed five crewed Apollo missions including the first human Moon landing to meet President John F. Kennedy’s goal. MSC Director Robert L. Gilruth assigned Low to plan future programs.


Left: James McDivitt. Right: George Low.

(...) The Apollo 12 prime crew of Commander Charles “Pete” Conrad, Command Module Pilot (CMP) Richard F. Gordon, and Lunar Module Pilot (LMP) Alan L. Bean and their backups David R. Scott, Alfred M. Worden, and James B. Irwin were heavily engaged in training for all aspects of their mission, scheduled for launch on Nov. 14. In addition to the primary objectives of achieving a pinpoint landing in Oceanus Procellarum (Ocean of Storms), deploying several scientific experiments as part of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), and collecting lunar samples, a secondary objective involved inspecting the robotic Surveyor 3 spacecraft that had touched down at that site in April 1967. The astronauts planned to retrieve the spacecraft’s camera and other equipment for return to Earth for scientists to analyze the effects of more than two years in the harsh lunar environment. Compared to Apollo 11’s 21-hour stay on the lunar surface and a single surface Extravehicular Activity (EVA) or spacewalk, Apollo 12 planned to conduct two EVAs during a 32-hour stay.


Left: Apollo 12 astronauts Conrad (left) and Bean practice EVA procedures with a mockup of Surveyor 3.
Right: Apollo 12 astronaut Bean demonstrates some of the ALSEP hardware, (left to right) the RTG, the magnetometer, the solar wind spectrometer, and the central station during a press conference at KSC.


(...)
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/50-years-ago-apollo-12-one-month-from-launch